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Frequently Asked Questions

By Rodney Baker,2015-02-28 02:01
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Frequently Asked QuestionsFreq

Frequently Asked Questions

    Q What does "in his or her possession" mean with respect to the requirement that a driver

    not have any ignition source in his or her possession in the vehicle? This is detailed in

    Regulation 13.6(2) of the Commonwealth Road Transport Reform (Dangerous Goods)

    Regulations.

    A "in his or her possession" means in the cabin of the vehicle. This includes in the glove-

    box, in lockers within the cabin, in any sleeper cab accessible directly from the cabin and

    in the driver's personal equipment located in the cabin. However, ignition sources located

    elsewhere on the vehicle in a secure location outside the cabin are not "in his or her

    possession".

    Q: Are fire extinguishers required to be fitted to each trailer of a combination vehicle

    transporting a placard load of dangerous goods?

    A: Fire extinguisher requirements are set out in Chapter 12 of the ADG Code and these

    apply to the vehicle as a whole, not to individual vehicle units, except for tank vehicles.

    These requirements only apply to placard loads. Australian Standard AS2809 Road Tank

    Vehicles for Dangerous Goods has more stringent controls for tank vehicles and these

    apply only to tank vehicles.

    Examples (not tank vehicles)

     - a rigid, semi-trailer or B-Double flat top, pantechnicon or curtain-sided vehicle carrying a

    placard load of packages must be fitted with one 30B extinguisher.

    - a rigid, semi-trailer or B-Double flat top, pantechnicon or curtain-sided vehicle carrying

    IBCs or bulk tanks must be fitted with one 10B extinguisher in the cabin plus one set of

    other extinguishers required by table 12.2 of the ADG Code.

    Vehicles which are tank vehicles must also comply with fire extinguisher stowage requirements of AS2809, which means that each individual unit must be fitted with the extinguishers set out in table 12.2 of the ADG Code.

    Examples (tank vehicles)

    - a rigid tanker, a trailer tanker or a semi-trailer tanker must be fitted with one 10B dry

    powder extinguisher in the cabin of the vehicle or towing vehicle plus one set of other

    extinguishers required by table 12.2 of the ADG Code, for example, for greater than

    10,000 litres of flammable liquids two 60B dry powder fire extinguishers or one 80B dry

    powder fire extinguisher and one 20B foam type fire extinguisher.

    - a B-Double tanker must be fitted with one 10B dry powder extinguisher in the cabin plus

    one set of other extinguishers required by table 12.2 of the ADG Code on each trailer, for

    example for non-flammable goods one 60B or two 30B dry powder fire extinguishers on

    each trailer.

    Q: Are copies of the relevant pages of Australian Standard HB76 - Dangerous Goods Initial

    Emergency Response Guide acceptable for use as the emergency information required

    for placard loads of dangerous goods?

    A: You may use a Standard or parts of a Standard only in accordance with the conditions of

    use of Australian Standards. SAI Global, the publisher of Australian Standards, holds

    the copyright for these Standards. You will need a copyright agreement with SAI Global

    if you wish to copy any part of an Australian Standard unless your proposed use is in

    accordance with the copyright conditions. The agreement application is available from

    SAI Global at http://www.standards.com.au/standards/directory/copyright/copyright.htm

    or by telephone on 1300 654 646.

     The Competent Authorities recognise any of the following as acceptable emergency information required by the ADG Code for consignments of dangerous goods: 1. a copy of the relevant pages of HB76; or

    2. a copy of the relevant AS1678 Emergency Procedure Guides; or

    3. other equivalent emergency information such as that provided by:

    a. CANUTEC - Emergency Response Guidebook 2004; or

    b. Other third party information suppliers.

    Q: What are the safety issues for the use of composite intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) for the transport of dangerous goods?

    A: Composite IBCs consist of an outer (normally metal) frame enclosing a plastics inner receptacle suitable for liquids. Transporters of composite IBCs need to ensure that: - Wherever possible, composite IBCs are transported in freight containers; - IBCs are correctly stowed and adequately restrained on a vehicle. Straps and chains

    are not to be used to restrain these IBCs unless:

    - any stresses are spread over all of the IBC’s metal frame rather than concentrated at 1

    or 2 points and

    - no stresses are imposed on the inner plastics receptacle; and

    - Freight stowed on the IBCs only rests on the IBC’s metal frame and does not place

    stresses on the inner plastics receptacle.

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