DOC

Foreign Language SOL 2007

By Joyce Wells,2014-04-28 04:15
8 views 0
Foreign Language Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools Board of Education Commonwealth of Virginia February 2007 Foreign Language Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools Adopted in February 2007 by the Board of Education Mark E. Emblidge, President Ella P. Ward, Vice President Tho..

Foreign

    Language

    Standards of Learning

    for

    Virginia

    Public Schools

Board of Education

    Commonwealth of Virginia

February 2007

Foreign

    Language

    Standards of Learning

    for

    Virginia

    Public Schools

    Adopted in February 2007 by the Board of Education

    Mark E. Emblidge, President

    Ella P. Ward, Vice President

    Thomas M. Brewster

    Isis M. Castro

    David L. Johnson

    Gary L. Jones

    Kelvin L. Moore

    Andrew J. Rotherham

    Eleanor B. Saslaw

    Superintendent of Public Instruction Billy K. Cannaday

Commonwealth of Virginia

Board of Education

    Post Office Box 2120 Richmond, VA 23218-2120

? February 2007

Foreword

    The Standards of Learning in this publication represent a major development in public education in Virginia. Adopted in February 2007 by the Virginia Board of Education, these standards emphasize the importance of foreign language instruction in the Commonwealth and, therefore, are an important part of Virginia’s efforts to provide challenging educational programs in the public schools and to enhance the preparation of Virginia’s students to compete in a rapidly expanding global society. Knowledge and skills

    that students acquire in their foreign language classes will reinforce and expand their learning in other subject areas, enable them to interact effectively with others, and give them increased access to information across the world.

    Reflecting a review of the previous standards adopted in June 2000, the Foreign Language Standards of Learning were developed through a series of public hearings and the efforts of many classroom teachers, curriculum specialists, administrators, and college faculty. These persons assisted the Department of Education in developing and reviewing the draft documents.

    Copies of the Foreign Language Standards of Learning have been distributed to public schools throughout Virginia for school divisions and teachers to use in developing curricula and lesson plans to support the standards. These standards state the end-of-course requirements in levels I through IV of French, German, Spanish, and Latin. The standards for level IV focus on refinement of language skills and may be applied to levels V, VI, and above by adjusting specific course content. There are also generic Modern Foreign Language Standards of Learning, levels I through IV, that may be adapted to other modern languages, including non-Roman-alphabet languages, such as Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Russian.

    The Standards of Learning set reasonable targets and expectations for what students should know and be able to do by the end of each language course offered for a standard unit of credit. Schools are encouraged to go beyond the prescribed standards to enrich the curriculum to meet the needs of all students. However, in order for students to become proficient in other languages, they must have opportunities for longer sequences of language study; therefore, school divisions are encouraged to offer foreign language instruction beginning in the elementary grades. The standards set clear, concise, and measurable academic expectations for young people. Parents are encouraged to work with their children to help them achieve the standards.

A major objective of Virginia’s educational agenda is to give its citizens a program of public education

    that is among the best in the nation and that meets the needs of all young people in the Commonwealth. These Standards of Learning continue the process for achieving that objective.

     Foreign Language Standards of Learning

    Introduction

    The Foreign Language Standards of Learning identify essential content, processes, and skills for each level of language learning in Virginia’s secondary schools. Included are specific standards for levels I

    through IV of French, German, Spanish, and Latin, as well as generic standards adaptable for levels I through IV of other modern languages, including non-Roman-alphabet languages, such as Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Russian. The standards for level IV focus on refinement of language skills and may be applied to levels V, VI, and above by adjusting specific course content. In addition, a curriculum framework for American Sign Language has been developed for levels I through III and is published in a separate document.

    Each level of the modern language standards is organized into seven content strands and contains a total of 10 to 12 standards that outline the knowledge, skills, and processes essential for language learning. Each level of the Latin standards is organized into six content strands and contains a total of seven or eight standards that focus on interpretation of text. Each standard is followed by two or more essential components of the standard. Examples following the phrase such as in some of the components are

    suggestions offered to clarify the intent of the standard and are not requirements.

    The emphasis on communication and interpretation ensures that students completing long-term, sequential foreign language programs in Virginia’s secondary schools will be able to interact, within

    reasonable limits, with users of the language and understand their culture. The level of proficiency reached depends largely on the amount of contact with the target language; therefore, school divisions are encouraged to offer foreign language instruction beginning in the elementary schools. However, the ability to communicate comfortably with native speakers of the language about most topics is not obtained solely through classroom study. Students should be encouraged to pursue opportunities beyond the normal classroom setting, including long-term contact with, or immersion in, the target language and culture(s), such as participation in the Virginia Governor’s Foreign Language Academies.

    The standards are intended to provide a framework from which school divisions may develop local curricula based on the needs of their students and community. The standards do not comprise the curriculum for a given course or prescribe how the content should be taught. The concepts and structures for each level should be presented in a spiraling fashion that allows them to be reintroduced with increasing complexity at various stages of language development. In addition, local assessments designed to measure students’ ability to use the target language should be aligned to local curricula and state

    standards.

    Several terms that have particular significance within foreign language education are used throughout the document. Reference is frequently made to culturally authentic materials, which are materials that have

    been created for and by native speakers of the language and that have been derived from the culture itself. In addition, because language courses are sequential, reference is made to level-appropriate linguistic

    elements, skills, or instructional materials. Level-appropriate means that the content, process, skill, or

    material described requires students to function at the level they have attained. For example, the same instructional resource, such as a culturally authentic text or video, may be used at various levels of instruction by simply matching the linguistic task assigned to the students with their level of language proficiency. Cultural competence refers to the appropriateness of a response within a social context.

    Virginia Department of Education 2007

    vii

Foreign Language Standards of Learning

    Goals

    Achieving linguistic fluency and cultural understanding is a long-term endeavor, requiring experiences beyond the classroom setting. Within the scope of the level of study, students will be able to perform with reasonable success in each of the following areas:

    Effective Communication

    ; Students will learn to communicate with others in a language other than English. ; Students will improve their understanding of and ability to communicate in the English language by

    comparing and contrasting another language with their own.

    Enhanced Cultural Understanding

    ; Students will develop an awareness of and an appreciation for another people’s unique way of life,

    the patterns of behavior that order their world, and the ideas and perspectives that guide their

    behaviors.

    ; Students will learn about other cultures’ contributions to the world and how these contributions have

    shaped international perspectives.

    Expanded Access to Information

    ; Students will connect with other disciplines through foreign language study, enabling them to

    reinforce and expand their understanding of the interrelationships among content areas. ; Students will access information in more than one language, giving them a greater range of resources

    and a richer base of knowledge.

    Increased Global Perspective

    ; Students will respond to and contribute to their communities and the world in a more informed and

    effective manner as a result of the global perspective gained in a foreign language class. ; Students will gain additional prospects for further education and career opportunities as a result of

    foreign language study.

Strands

    The content of the Modern Foreign Language Standards of Learning is organized around the following seven essential strands (defined on the following pages) of language development and application: ; Person-to-Person Communication

    ; Listening and Reading for Understanding

    ; Oral and Written Presentation

    ; Cultural Perspectives, Practices, and Products

    ; Making Connections through Language

    ; Cultural and Linguistic Comparisons

    ; Communication across Communities

    Virginia Department of Education 2007

    viii

     Foreign Language Standards of Learning

    Person-to-Person Communication

    The first strand focuses on the communicative skills needed to exchange information in the target language with another person. When demonstrating skills in the person-to-person strand, students demonstrate their ability to initiate, sustain, and close a conversation or an interactive written communication, such as an e-mail exchange.

    Listening and Reading for Understanding

    The second strand consists of the communicative skills necessary to comprehend speaking and writing in the target language. The student’s level of communicative competence is indicated by the degree of

    comprehension of spoken or written language, together with interpretation of other visual and auditory cues given by the speaker or writer. This strand differs from the person-to-person strand in that the skills involve understanding one-way communication with no opportunity for clarification through interaction. Oral and Written Presentation

    The third strand centers around the communicative skills needed to present information in the target language orally or in writing to an audience. This set of skills calls for the student to be able to organize thoughts and deliver presentations to a variety of audiences. These skills involve both spontaneous and prepared presentations and, again, differ from the person-to-person strand in that students do not interact with the audience.

    Cultural Perspectives, Practices, and Products

    Understanding the culture of native speakers of the target language is an integral part of learning any language. Students demonstrate their understanding of the inextricable link between language and culture by developing an understanding of the perspectives or viewpoints, practices or patterns of behavior, and products of the culture(s). In-depth understanding of these elements of culture improves the students’

    ability to interact appropriately with native speakers of the language and to function successfully within that cultural setting.

    Making Connections through Language

    Topics addressed in the foreign language classroom provide an opportunity for students to connect information about the language and culture(s) they are learning with concepts being studied in other subject areas. In addition, students are able to enhance their knowledge of other subject areas by accessing additional information in the target language. This reciprocal reinforcement and enhancement of curricular concepts increases students’ in-depth understanding of the total curriculum.

    Cultural and Linguistic Comparisons

    The process of language learning causes students to reflect on their own culture and language in a way that increases their understanding of the nature of language in general and of elements of their own language and culture. As students become more knowledgeable about the target language, they increase their skills in their native language by making frequent comparisons between the target language and their own. The insight students develop into their own culture helps them increase their understanding of and openness to people who speak other languages and who may view the world from a different perspective.

    Virginia Department of Education 2007

    ix

Foreign Language Standards of Learning

    Communication across Communities

    Knowledge of the target language and culture is enhanced when students have the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge beyond the classroom setting. This application can take many forms, from corresponding with a native speaker of the language to visiting nearby sites where the language and culture are prominent. Without traveling far, Virginia students can find myriad opportunities to make these connections, for example, by interacting with ethnic populations within the local community, establishing contacts with foreign-owned businesses that have offices and factories in many parts of the state, and using numerous resources available through the Internet and other media. Practical application of their language skills motivates students to continue their language study and develop a lifelong interest in participating in the global community.

    For Latin language learning, six strands have been identified. The first two focus on the particular skills needed by students to read and interpret Latin texts, while the remaining four are common with the modern foreign language strands:

    ; Reading for Understanding

    ; Using Oral and Written Language for Understanding

    ; Cultural Perspectives, Practices, and Products

    ; Making Connections through Language

    ; Cultural and Linguistic Comparisons

    ; Communication across Communities

    Reading for Understanding

    The focus of a Latin program is the ability of students to derive cultural as well as linguistic information from a Latin text. Students must be able to interpret a Latin text in order to understand the ancient world through the thoughts and information expressed by the author. Beginning students learn to comprehend basic Latin sentences and stories and are introduced as early as possible to authentic texts, such as graffiti from the Roman world or short philosophical statements of the ancient Romans.

    Using Oral and Written Language for Understanding

    The ability of students to read a Latin text is facilitated through their active use of oral and written Latin. For many students, hearing the language and learning to use it orally enables them to read and understand Latin text more easily. As part of the language-learning process, students learn to ask and answer questions, comprehend spoken texts, and compose simple phrases and sentences in Latin. As students progress in their language study, attention shifts from writing the language to developing the ability to read Latin texts aloud with attention to meter and phrasing.

    Virginia Department of Education 2007

    x

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com