DOCX

IN THE WAKE OF THE WHALERS

By Lois Ellis,2014-09-19 04:24
5 views 0
In the Wake of the Whalers 0 Table of Contents I. Nature of the Request ..................................................................................................................... 1 II. Project Introduction .............................................

     In the Wake of the Whalers

     Table of Contents

    I. Nature of the Request ..................................................................................................................... 1 II. Project Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 2 Brief History of the Project .................................................................................................................. 3 Relationship of the Project to Others on the Topic ............................................................................... 4

    III. Project Description ...................................................................................................................... 5 Onsite .................................................................................................................................................. 6 Online.................................................................................................................................................. 7 Onboard .............................................................................................................................................. 8 IV. Audience...................................................................................................................................... 9 Marketing and Publicity Capacity ....................................................................................................... 10 Audience Evaluation .......................................................................................................................... 11 V. Organizational Profile .................................................................................................................... 11 Project Partner Organizations ............................................................................................................ 12 VI. Public Accessibility and Admission ............................................................................................. 14

    VII. Project Team.............................................................................................................................. 14 Mystic Seaport Staff Project Team ..................................................................................................... 14

    Consulting Scholars, Historians, and Advisors .................................................................................... 16

    VIII. Work Plan .................................................................................................................................. 17 NEH Work Plan October 2011-August 2012 ....................................................................................... 17

    Planning Deliverables ........................................................................................................................ 19 IX. Fundraising Plans ....................................................................................................................... 20 X. Appendices .................................................................................................................................... 20

     0

     In the Wake of the Whalers

I. Nature of the Request

    Mystic Seaport requests a one-year (October 2011 September 2012) “Bridging Cultures” planning

    grant of $74,853 from NEH to plan “In the Wake of the Whalers: American Identity and Worldview as

    Shaped by our Whaling Heritage.” This major national public programming initiative will revolve around the Museum’s most important artifact, the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan, and the iconic vessel’s thgroundbreaking “38 Voyage” to strategic ports of call along the northeastern seaboard.

    The Morgan is the oldest American merchant vessel afloat. Her active whaling career spanned eight decades and included 37 voyages; the vessel and her multicultural crews sailed to all corners of the world. This authentic and well-documented artifact provides a portal into the nation’s vibrant maritime heritage. The sweep of her compelling storyline vividly illustrates the nation’s emergence as an thinternational power in the 19 century. Long after the decline and eventual outlawing of commercial whaling, the Morgan remains an important symbol of a once-flourishing industry that had a profound impact on our national identity, economy, and culture.

    The project’s proposed intellectual framework is organized around four humanities themes, all firmly grounded in the broader context of America’s maritime history and bound by the common thread of the

    story of whaling: 1) The Cultural Crossroads of Globalization (cultural cross- pollination); 2) Profit from

    the Deep (economic endeavors); 3) The American Sailor: Making of an Icon (American identity); and 4)

    Thar She Blows: From Whale Hunt to Whale Watch (changing perceptions of the natural world).

    This initiative will employ three overarching programming formats that will be implemented over a three year period beginning in fall of 2013. These formats include: onsite (a 4,000 square foot exhibit at thMystic Seaport and traveling exhibits and programs: spring 2014), onboard (on the vessel’s historic 38

    Voyage: summer 2014), and online (through a dedicated website providing access to project exhibits

    and programs and exclusive digital elements, activities, and analysis: fall 2013). Refined and further defined during the planning phase, these formats will serve as the platform for delivering innovative programming that is interdisciplinary in scope, national in impact, and model in nature.

In alignment with the Museum’s new strategic plan and grounded in multiple delivery systems this

    reinterpretation will set a new standard for museum innovation in the dissemination of public history, create a bold vision for the physical and ideological “boundaries” of museums, and explore with the eyes of a new generation the meaning and purpose of the objects we preserve. This ambitious project will set the standard for engaging national audiences (with an emphasis on new and under-served audiences) through relevant and meaningful program content and delivery methods.

The planning phase will involve the following NEH funded activities: a two-day scholar charrette will

    clarify and amplify the intellectual foundations of the project, illuminate the themes in light of greatest potential audience impact, and identify the most creative, effective, and inclusive program delivery methods. Front-end and formative audience surveys will help us shape and refine programming,

    outcomes, methodology, and benchmarks for our success. A panel of advisors from stakeholder

    organizations representing each of the proposed ports of call will participate in two planning charrettes thto shape the activities of the 38 Voyage from special port activities to the project’s overarching

    storyline. Design planning (not funded by NEH) will result in development of a preliminary exhibit script and treatment and a web strategy outline.

     1

     In the Wake of the Whalers

    Mystic Seaport, a leading national center for maritime research and education, is uniquely suited to implement a project of this programmatic scope. The Museum will harness interdisciplinary partnerships, substantial in-house collections resources, humanities staff, and current humanities scholarship to build the foundation for a dynamic public program initiative. Compelling content and innovative formats will engage national audiences in a conversation on how American identity and worldview has been, and continues to be, profoundly influenced and shaped by maritime endeavors.

II. Project Introduction

    Mystic Seaport’s mission is to promote understanding of historic and contemporary issues through

    relevant, compelling, and immersive programs that inspire an enduring connection to the American maritime experience. In the Wake of the Whalers will develop the intellectual content and creative

    delivery systems to engage a national audience in learning how American identity and worldview have thbeen shaped by maritime endeavors. With the Charles W. Morgan’s anticipated 38 Voyage, Mystic

    Seaport has a singular opportunity to set the standard for new, innovative museum work, exploring the history, significance, and relevance of America’s commercial and cultural maritime heritage. This project

    will leverage the connective power of the web and the transformative nature of creative interactive exhibits and programs through the broad scope of stories embodied in the Charles W. Morgan and thilluminated by her 38 Voyage. This authentic and well-documented artifact provides a portal into the vibrant maritime heritage that stretches back to the trade patterns of Native Americans living along rivers, lakes, and shorelines to the New England farm boys and enslaved African Americans who ran away to sea in search of adventure and personal freedom. Today, we continue to be shaped by maritime influences, from the diplomatic and trade decisions of U.S. policy makers over deep sea oil drilling and the importation of goods to consumers deciding whether or not to buy sustainable fish at the local market.

As the sole surviving example of a once-common 19th-century American working vessel, the Charles W.

    Morgan provides the perfect platform from which to explore maritime commercial and cultural developments and their impact. For more than 200 years, the whaling industry played an essential role in American economic and technological development - lighting homes and lubricating machinery of the industrial revolution - helping to transform America into a great nation and greatly impacting Americans for generations to follow. An active participant in this important historical era, the Charles W. Morgan

    helped extend America’s cultural and commercial sphere of influence abroad. In 80 years she called at more than 100 ports, from Alaska to Australia, Cape Cod to Cape Verde. Her American and foreign-born crews were culturally and racially diverse; the more than 1,600 sailors who sailed on the Morgan hailed

    from more than 50 countries.

By actively engaging the public in ways that are enhanced by their own beliefs and experiences, In the

    Wake of the Whalers will attract participation from a national audience to explore how maritime endeavors in general - and whaling in particular - have reflected and shaped our commercial and cultural worldview. The Museum will use a multidisciplinary approach to explore the following key humanities themes of 1) cultural cross-pollination; 2) economic endeavors; 3) American identity; and 4) changing perceptions of the natural world:

-- The Cultural Crossroads of Globalization: Through transnational contacts and exchanges, American

    mariners established and sustained international commercial relations and cross-pollinated distinctive cultures: specifically art, music, literature, and foodways. Whalemen and other deepwater sailors were often the first Americans to visit distant ports, bringing American goods and ideas to these unknown lands and returning home with stories and objects that formed the foundation of an emerging world

     2

     In the Wake of the Whalers

    view. Over time, as the racial and ethnic makeup of whaling crews shifted from predominantly white, native-born New Englanders to native-born blacks and foreign-born nationals, the Morgan and other

    ships also served as de facto immigration vessels and as sites of intense cultural exchange among crew members during the lengthy voyages.

    -- Profit from the Deep: The volatile high-risk, high-profit maritime industry served as an important economic engine throughout the 19th century. For example, many of the personal fortunes resulting from the whaling trade were invested in building mills and railroads in the mid 1800s. The pursuit of profit also triggered innovations in whaling. However, the technology that successfully increased catches also dangerously depleted the populations of several whale species, thereby lengthening voyages and taking Americans to distant waters and ports.

-- The American Sailor: Making of an Icon: Through maritime literature, art, and music, the iconic figure

    of the American sailor has reflected and shaped a common American identity. During the age of sail, maritime imagery of the adventurous mariner and the storm-tossed ship held symbolic meaning for a young nation that prized personal independence, mobility, and a romantic sense of adventure. From Moby-Dick to scrimshaw, the figure of the roving sailor stands alongside the American cowboy as a legendary American figure expressing our collective sense of the world and our role in it. Exploration of the evocative artwork surrounding whalemen and whaling and the real stories of men who lived (and died) aboard the Morgan will reveal the alignment and the gaps between these myths and reality.

-- Thar She Blows: From Whale Hunt to Whale Watch: Through changing perceptions of our acceptable

    stance towards whales and whaling, Americans have shown a dramatic shift in their understanding of humans' place in the natural world. While the whale hunters' knowledge of the sea and its creatures influenced scientific exploration and study, our 21st-century perspectives on the harvest of the world's largest mammals would baffle the 19th-century whaling crews, who saw the ocean’s seemingly

    boundless resources as sources of profit. Exploring the causes and consequences of these shifts will show that preserving a historic whaleship and saving the whales are compatible endeavors.

     thThrough these themes, the restoration, and 38 Voyage, Mystic Seaport will move forward on a number

    of priority initiatives identified in the Strategic Plan adopted by the Board of Trustees in 2010. Key initiatives from the Plan include: 1) use the Watercraft Collection to connect and inspire our audiences with our rich maritime heritage; 2) sail the Morgan, post restoration, on a multi-port ceremonial voyage;

    3) onsite, online, onboard: develop a panoply of vibrant public history exhibits with interdisciplinary and contemporary approaches; 4) connect the Museum more directly to the sea; 5) reach diverse audiences through a full range of exhibits that use multiple techniques to inform, engage, and inspire.

Brief History of the Project

    When the Morgan was launched in 1841, she joined a fleet of American ships that were pursuing whales to all the earth’s oceans, driven by an international demand and market for whale oil and bone. Over the next 80 years the Morgan completed 37 voyages, taking her around the globe and to the effective end of American whaling under sail. Certainly no one imagined that this ship alone would survive to tell the story of over 2,700 ships that sailed on 14,864 voyages during the 200 plus years of the American whale fishery.

Since arriving at Mystic Seaport in 1941, the Morgan has been a pivotal artifact informing institutional

    priorities in preservation, collections, education, research, and visitor experience. During this time, the Museum amassed a significant collection of artifacts and primary documents related to whaling, making

     3

     In the Wake of the Whalers

her one of the nation’s most well-documented ships and providing entre into the personal stories that thbring life to the ship and illuminate the times. Currently undergoing her 4 major restoration, the

    Morgan will emerge as strong as when first launched and will be preserved for future generations to the highest standards of accuracy and integrity. Key milestones in the current restoration and program are:

    ; 2000The Morgan received the Maritime Heritage Award by the World Ship Trust;

    ; 2004—The Museum is awarded funding from Save America’s Treasures to begin the materials

    acquisition phase of the Morgan restoration;

    ; 2006Over 200 descendants of those who owned or sailed on the Morgan gathered at the

    Museum to commemorate her storied past and the diversity of her crew members;

    ; 2008NOAA and Mystic Seaport cohost a 3-day Whaling Heritage Symposium, including papers

    from archaeologists, historians, curators, marine resource managers, and the public;

    ; 2008The Morgan is hauled out for restoration;

    ; 2009Opening of the IMLS-funded exhibit “Restoring an Icon: The Charles W. Morgan,

    providing historical context and hands on activities related to the work in the Museum’s

    Preservation Shipyard;

    1th; 2009 The Museum decides to pursue a ceremonial 38 Voyage at the conclusion of the

    restoration, thus setting in motion an ambitious vision for reinterpreting and reinvigorating

    the institution’s signature artifact;

    ; 2010The National Maritime Historical Society honored the Preservation Shipyard staff and

    volunteers with the prestigious “Distinguished Service Award” for their work maintaining and

    restoring historic wooden vessels and building historic reproductions;

    ; 2010Work begins on the Online Learning Community, an educational, interdisciplinary

    website for teachers, students, and families funded by the Institute of Museum and Library

    Services (IMLS). Content will focus on the Morgan.

Relationship of the Project to Others on the Topic

    This project builds on the success of other recent public-history projects on Americas maritime past and

    whaling in particular. Like the best of them, In the Wake of the Whalers will be grounded in scholarship

    and humanities-based content and reach a broad national audience. But it will be unique in revolving around a large iconic artifact that will employ a wide range of robust programs onsite, online, and onboard to explore the central themes. The cross-platform approach maximizes scholarly input, audience assessment, and partnership work to be completed in the planning phase funded by this grant.

FILM: The PBS documentary film Into the Deep: America, Whaling & the World aired in May 2010 and

    profiled American whalings history from its 17th-century origins through its decline in the late 19th century. Director Ric Burns drew heavily on the research material, staff expertise, and assistance of Mystic Seaport. The Museum is now working with filmmaker Bailey Pryor to write, produce, and direct a historical documentary on the Charles W. Morgan from her launch through the restoration and sail.

WEB: Produced by the Martha’s Vineyard Museum, Laura Jernegan: Girl on a Whaleship, uses the

    journal of a six-year-old girl from Edgartown, Massachusetts to tell the story of whaling and 19th-

     1 The decision to sail the Morgan on a six-week “expedition” was based on a number of criteria, including the stipulation that the

    requirements of the sail would not compromise the integrity of the restoration, and that the safety of the vessel would dictate the

    choice of ports and sailing dates. The Museum’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously to move forward with the voyage and the

    vision for reinterpretation through new content and innovative programming.

     4

     In the Wake of the Whalers

century port life. For older audiences, Mystic Seaport’s CORIOLIS: An Interdisciplinary Journal of

    Maritime Studies provides a new, refereed forum on works of human interaction with the sea. In The

    Wake of the Whalers will use the web to provide broad public access to original documents and images, scholarly analysis, and key stories on whaling’s cultural, economic, artistic, and ethical aspects.

    EXHIBIT: Recent museum exhibits explore the local, national, and global phenomena of whaling. The New Bedford Whaling Museum currently features From Pursuit to Preservation: The History of Human

    Interaction with Whalers. The newly re-installed maritime gallery in the Smithsonian’s National Museum

    of American History, titled On the Water: Stories from Maritime America, includes a whaleboat and

    other whaling material on long-term loan from Mystic Seaport. In the Wake of the Whalers will also

    explore the history of whaling and its relevance to our lives today, mostly by venturing outside the physical limits of a single museum with port visits around New England, an interactive website, and exhibits that can travel across the country and be adapted for each host city.

SAIL: Many historic and replica “Tall Ships” sail and can be visited in ports around the country. However, ththe Charles W. Morgan is one of only a few 19-century tall ships capable of actually sailing. This

    demonstrates the longevity and precision of the shipwrights craft. It returns an important artifact to her

    original environment and enables thousands of people to interact with her and learn from her. And it speaks to the power of artifacts to transport people to another time and mindset through immersive experiences and encounters with the authentic.

III. Project Description

    In the Wake of the Whalers will include onsite and traveling exhibit components (onsite), broad web thpresence (online), and 38 Voyage programming (onboard). Designed to have the greatest possible

    temporal and geographic reach, these components will be grounded in the identified significant humanities themes of: cultural cross-pollination, economic endeavors, American identity, and changing perceptions of the natural world. The various delivery modes will provide targeted audiences with powerful, complementary learning experiences.

    As the custodian of an extraordinary maritime collection and as a major center of maritime research, Mystic Seaport is well positioned to lead a project of this programmatic scope and intellectual breadth. The Museum boasts one of the world’s most extensive sources of whaling-related materials, including nearly 6,000

    images and objects and thousands of pages of manuscripts. The Charles W. Morgan is the most

    thoroughly researched “object” in the Museum’s collections. Of paramount importance for the success of this project is the Museum’s extensive collection of Morgan primary documents log books, business

    records, journals, letters, diaries, oral histories, and official records, as well as images and artifacts

    preserved and made publicly accessible at Mystic Seaport. All Morgan-related manuscripts in the

    collections have been digitized and are available via the Charles W. Morgan Digital Library on the

    Museum’s website. Considered as a whole, this incredible repository illuminates a broad range of

    interdisciplinary topics, including technology, economics, social history, and the arts, and provides a thstriking visual, aural, and textual representation of 19-century maritime industries, with whaling

    standing out as one of its most dramatic.

    This planning grant will help Mystic Seaport build the foundation for an integrated national educational opportunity and series of events. Our planning deliverables, which will propel us forward to our final implementation activities, include: a two-day scholar charrette that will both illuminate the themes in light of the greatest potential audience impact and explore the relationship of the project to current humanities scholarship; two partner organization charrettes to plan port visits and programming; front-

     5

     In the Wake of the Whalers

    end and formative audience evaluation; and in-house program and marketing plans based on audience survey, scholar feedback, and partner charrettes. Non NEH-funded activities include planning for exhibit design elements and web presence. The scope of planning activities will lead us to eventual onsite, online, and onboard program implementation.

Onsite

    Reinterpreting the Charles W. Morgan opens new possibilities for exhibition topics and venuesboth at

    Mystic Seaport and at museums, libraries, and other public institutions across the nation. A long-term installation at the Museum will be augmented by traveling exhibit and related programs to bring the story to new audiences.

    Exhibitions at Mystic Seaport

    NEH funding to support scholars and advisors charrettes as well as visitor surveys will be vital in identifying the most compelling and important stories that can best be expressed in exhibition format. Incorporating a wide range of visual and media elements, including sound and other audio-visual components, the onsite exhibit will be installed in the Museum’s largest (4,000 square feet) and most impressive exhibition gallery. The hub from which the spokes of programming (traveling exhibits, ports of call exhibits, and web presence) radiate, the exhibit will use an interdisciplinary approach with a range of contemporary and historic elements. We envision the exhibit beginning with a dramatic shift in perspective/perception perhaps underwater from the whale’s view looking aloft to the hoops. The exhibit will continue in a non-chronological thematic approach, employing “first voice” sources (logs, letters) to illustrate the themes and perspectives. An additional, 1,700 square foot gallery will be devoted to changing exhibits relating to the Morgan. In this “experimental gallery,” we will provide

    opportunities for outside voices to be heard. The first exhibit will feature art inspired by the Charles W.

    Morgan and created by numerous artists from a Pratt affiliated group.

    While we have not asked for NEH funding to engage an outside exhibit design firm, alternate funding sources will support soliciting requests for proposals to several firms based on a proven track record of excellent, innovative exhibit design, demonstrated ability to design within a budget in a timely manner, and an ability to work in a collaborative environment.

Traveling Exhibits and Programs

    The traveling component is central to reaching a national audience. Information gleaned from NEH-supported workshops with scholars, partner organizations, and Museum visitors will dictate the formats and humanities-based core content of traveling exhibits and programs. Staff will contact potential sites throughout the country for their level of interest, budgetary considerations, and schedules. This thtraveling component holds high potential for national impact, both during and after the 38 Voyage.

    Our association with the Council of American Maritime Museums (CAMM) will enable the Museum to quickly disseminate program information and ascertain which organizations are interested. While maritime museums and organizations in coastal locations are obvious choices, we will also actively solicit input from inland community organizations.

    The following concepts are examples of approaches currently under consideration. Variations and new ideas will emerge during the planning discussions.

    - Moby-Dick traveling exhibit and lecture program for libraries: Scaled for a limited display space and

    budget, this exhibit would use images and video from the sail and reproductions of artifacts to help

    elucidate passages in the book. This inexpensive but effective exhibit will help readers make real life

     6

     In the Wake of the Whalers

    connections with the book through scrimshaw, whale craft (harpoons, lances, etc.), log books, thnautical instruments, models, photographs, and ship carvings, in addition to 38 Voyage video.

    - An innovative modular approach to an exhibit based on the changing perceptions of whales and the

    natural world: This option would feature multiple exhibit components with varying degrees of

    content depth, thereby allowing each venue to customize and produce a show to meet individual

    space and taste. Parts of the show might travel to a children’s museum or a community center,

    while other parts could be produced at a maritime museum.

    - Free digital files of an exhibit on the transnational influence of the whaling industry: This option

    would allow organizations of all sizes to customize and produce their own shows, giving venues the

    opportunity to add local flavor. This could also become an online exhibition created to include

    content uploads from participating institutions.

    - A traveling panel exhibit or speakers' circuit to San Francisco, Alaska, and/or Hawaii: This alternative

    would allow faraway communities to explore and celebrate their strong links to the Morgan and

    New England whaling.

    - A partnership with local schools and museums in distance Morgan ports: This concept enlists the

    input of others with varying perspectives, perhaps by asking them to send materials from their cities

    to be transported on the ship during her voyage as a sort of time capsule.

Online

    In the Wake of the Whalers will be Mystic Seaport’s most visible and comprehensive digital outreach

    effort to date. With funding from NEH, the Museum will work with leading experts in the field to develop the most appropriate elements for the program, content, and audiences. These programs will provide access for users across the country and around the world to search, sort, and aggregate information about whaling and maritime history in ways that bring meaning to the subject for each user. The online experience will include a selection of current existing label copy, quotes, and images of photographs and artifacts from the formal exhibition; video programs and still photography that are thproduced during the 38 Voyage; new podcasts for posting on YouTube; a photo gallery of photographs and artifacts from Mystic Seaport’s collections that are relevant to the story but were not included in

    the formal exhibit; a visitor submission page for online visitors to formally submit their photographs and stories; a create-your-own exhibit section where visitors can select objects and images from the collection to create/curate their own exhibit on the topic. The online exhibit could also include themed games for families and young adults.

    Currently Mystic Seaport is involved in a series of online projects that would support and enhance this component of In the Wake of the Whalers. While Mystic Seaport is not requesting funding from the NEH

    for these four projects, they provide a complete picture of the Museum’s increasing scope of digital delivery modes and broad reach beyond its physical gate. These projects include:

    ; Online Learning Community Funded through IMLS, this program will be a dynamic, interactive

    website where children, teachers, parents, and Museum staff participate in the co-creation of

    authentic learning experiences. The Charles W. Morgan will be the main content around which

    the online learning community will gather.

    ; Whaling Journals and Google Earth Externally produced, this program prototype will use thGoogle Earth to map the voyages of 19-century whaling ships. Launched using the logbook

    from the first voyage of the Charles W. Morgan, users will eventually be able to cross reference

    information from the historic record with current climate conditions, species populations, and

    modern imagery. Google Earth technology has the potential for broad impact and accessibility.

     7

     In the Wake of the Whalers

    ; Searchable Sea Literature Developed by faculty and students of the Williams-Mystic program,

    this online database is a searchable collection of American works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry,

    and plays in which oceans, large rivers, or expansive lakes are critical to the story.

    ; Online Charles W. Morgan materials In addition to the Mystic Seaport’s digitized collections,

    the Museum has worked closely with the New Bedford Whaling Museum, New Bedford Free

    Public Library, and the Providence Public Library to increase the number of digitized materials

    supporting the Morgan.

Onboard

    thThe 38 Voyage

    Short in duration but long in impact, this historic voyage will be the centerpiece of the In the Wake of

    the Whalers initiative. The NEH-funded visitor studies, charrettes, port visits, and partner workshops will inform key decisions in leveraging this once-in-a-lifetime voyage. Over the course of 6-8 weeks in the summer of 2014, the Morgan will visit select New England ports, chosen for their connection to whaling and commerce stories and their deep water facilities. From the historic port of New London, CT to the Morgan’s famed home port of New Bedford, MA to the NOAA national heritage sanctuary of Stellwagen Bank, this voyage traces the story of our interactions with the planet’s largest mammals. Whales have

    inspired generations to reach beyond their known world: fueling dreams of great wealth from harvesting oil, inspiring unparalleled literary and artistic symbolism, and driving science to better understand our world. In the Wake of the Whalers will refine the voyage storyline and develop related

    programs that illuminate the unique contributions of each port in this epic story.

    Each celebratory port visit will include a combination of core content and unique activities that highlight elements of the thematic content. Visitors will be welcomed aboard the ship to view and hear about life below the deck as well as above it. Graphic panels illuminating the storyline will be installed near the ship. These will describe the voyage, provide background on the Morgan’s history and recent restoration,

    and invite public input. Programmatic elements will include costumed role players, artisans (ship carving, coopering, blacksmithing), a dramatic performance, live sea music, and sail-handling and whaleboat demonstrations. Participatory activities will simulate going aloft, knot tying boards, and other seamanship skills activities will provide hands-on opportunities.

    Although the route is still subject to change, the following ports are integral to the voyage:

     thNew London, CT: The third largest whaling port in the 19 century, New London will be the official start thof the 38 Voyage. While in New London, the Morgan will undergo final preparations for the full voyage

    including ballasting, rigging, crew training, and shakedown sails. Programs will raise awareness of New London’s whaling heritage and public access to the voyage preparations will provide unique insight into the work required for a long voyage.

    Newport, RI: From seafaring trade to recreational sailing, Newport is steeped in maritime traditions. Newport offers the opportunity for significant exposure to a large seasonal population in one of the country’s pre-eminent maritime communities. Programs will focus on the age of sail, vessel design, and wooden ship preservation.

New Bedford, MA: The homeport of the Charles W. Morgan during her 80 year whaling career, New

    Bedford will be the most important call on the voyage. The potential impact of this visit on the city and its residents is immense. Once home to Frederick Douglass (who worked as a caulker on whaling ships),

     8

     In the Wake of the Whalers

New Bedford is a multicultural community with deep roots in the whaling and fishing industries of the th19 century. The Morgan’s story will unfold against a city with architectural, cultural, and aesthetic ties

    to this historic industry. Unique programs will unpack the well documented interplay of ship and town. The port visit will be an unprecedented public history opportunity as the New Bedford community welcomes the Morgan and brings untold stories and reminiscences of her past to light. Herman Melville captured the essence of the city in Chapter 6 of the legendary Moby-Dick:

    “…[NB] is perhaps the dearest place to live in, in all New England. It is a land of

    oilGo and gaze upon the iron emblematical harpoons round yonder lofty mansion,

    and your question will be answered. Yes; all these brave houses and flowery gardens

    came from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. One and all, they were harpooned

    and dragged up hither from the bottom of the sea…”

     Chapter vi, The Street, Moby- Dick

Provincetown, MA and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary: The voyage storyline progresses

    to the present with these destinations, refocusing the narrative to contemporary perspective on whales and the natural world. Established in 1992, Stellwagen Bank is an 842-square-mile (638-square-nautical-mile) marine protected area at the mouth of Massachusetts Bay. A rich and productive fishing ground, Stellwagen Bank is also a popular whale watching destination, where 17 species have been sited. Programs will include day trips to Stellwagen Bank.

Other ports: An additional voyage leg to the port of Boston is currently under consideration. Two thimportant whaling centers—Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyardwill not be included in the 38 Voyage

    itinerary due to timing and navigational hazards in the surrounding waters. However, representatives from these communities will participate in the planning phase and their stories will be included in the final program plan.

IV. Audience

    With this project Mystic Seaport aims to create and deepen an enduring connection to the sea with a broad national audience that includes, but is not limited to, its existing visitors.

    The most recent exit survey tracking Mystic Seaport audience demographics (August 2007) provided the following snapshot of Museum on-site visitors: Education: 39% held a college degree and 18% held a

    graduate degree. Ethnicity: Caucasian, 89%; African American, 4%; Hispanic, 3%; Asian, 1%; other ethnicity, 2%. Age: The average age of visiting adults is 49, and the average age of children is 8.9. Forty-nine percent of visiting groups had children in the party. This audience is comprised of tourists and general visitors including multi-generational families and those with an interest in public or maritime history; Museum members (currently 17,000 membership households, representing an estimated 39,100 members from every state and 31 countries); school/youth groups; and group travel visitors.

The Museum’s website hosts 654,863 (period 1/1/10 1/1/11) unique visitors annually. The Museum

    relies on electronic communications to keep constituents informed between print publications of its membership magazine, Mystic Seaport. More than 30,500 people have signed up to receive regular

    email updates regarding Museum activities.

Onsite exhibition and traveling exhibit/program components: will appeal to the full range of Museum

    visitor constituencies including general visitors (including multi-generational families), Museum members, school/youth groups, and group travel visitors.

     9

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com