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EN3007_(SEPT_2011)X

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WRITERS FOR THE NATION: AMERICAN LITERARY MODERNISM. TUSCALOOSA: U OF ... AMERICAN CULTURE BETWEEN THE WARS: REVISIONARY MODERNISM AND POSTMODERN CRITIQUE.

    MODULE DESCRIPTOR

    MODULE American Literature TITLE

    MODULE CREDIT EN3007 (L6) 20 CODE VALUE

    MODULE Semester 1 and/or Semester 2 DELIVERY

    PATTERN OF Weekly DELIVERY

    MODULE Will Kaufman TUTOR

    DATE VERSION 5 May 2011 1 APPROVED NUMBER

    PARTNER Journalism, Media and SCHOOL INSTITUTION Communication

    RELATIONSHIP WITH OTHER MODULES

    Co-Pre-Excluded EN2016 None None requisites requisites combinations EN2017

    MODULE AIMS

    This module aims to:

    1. Encourage the exploration, evaluation and analysis of significant examples of American fiction,

    narrative, poetry and drama.

    2. Develop and facilitate the understanding of the importance of cultural, historical, political, critical and thematic contexts in the interpretation of literary texts.

    3. Explore the development of particular genres in American literary history.

    4. Interrogate the reception of American texts, both in their time and subsequently.

    MODULE CONTENT

    Typically, the syllabus will include writings American city and small town, rural writing, fictional

    interrogations of race and national identity, introspective writings and critiques of the modern and postmodern. Issues of narrative, fictional, poetic and dramatic form are considered, as are questions of the American canon and critical response.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES

    On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

    Acquire a basic familiarity with significant examples of American fiction, narrative, poetry and 1. drama.

    Recognise the importance of the relationship between American literature and its various 2. cultural, historical, political, critical and thematic contexts.

    3. Demonstrate critical ability utilising an appropriate scholarly discourse.

    Balance his or her individual analysis with a discussion and utilisation of relevant critical 4. material

    Demonstrate an appropriate level and degree of research skills commensurate with Level 4 5. work.

    MODULE LEARNING PLAN

    LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY

    This module is delivered on a weekly lecture and seminar basis, buttressed with regular tutorials. The lectures aim to present the broader critical, historical and cultural issues surrounding the texts, while the seminars enable you to explore text and context in closer detail through analytical discussion;

    tutorials engage with students’ individual scholarly development and concerns. Assessment takes the form of one research preparation assignment, a research paper and a final examination. The research preparation assignment focuses on the enhancement of research skills and the gathering of critical material; the research paper enables the production of a sustained, scholarly critical analysis; the final

exam enables the consolidation and demonstration of analytical skills and critical practice in a

    summative fashion. In common with all other English modules, this module is designed to foster an active, participatory, independent approach to learning, to develop critical faculties and to consolidate and develop written and oral communication skills.

    You should endeavour to attend all timetabled learning activities for each module. Notification of illness or exceptional requests for leave of absence must be made to the individual module tutor and to your course leader. We keep very clear records of attendance and are keen to encourage you to attend your session: attendance at taught sessions will enable you to develop the key skills you need

    to progress on to the next stage of your career. You should remember that employers expect you to

    keep to agreed hours in work, and we consider ourselves to be offering you a professional approach to develop good employability skills. Managing your time effectively now will be of significant benefit to you in your future.

    No of DIRECT CONTACT HOURS hours

    Lectures 12

    Seminars 24

    Tutorials 3

    Resource and Contextual Reviews (for example film and documentary showing) 12

    Assignment Preparation and feedback 9

    TOTAL CONTACT HOURS (At Level 4, normally a minimum of 60 hours per 20 credits, unless offset elsewhere in the course)

    INDEPENDENT LEARNING HOURS 60

    Reading (12 weeks reading per week average 6 hours per week) 75

    Research and Seminar Preparation (online and library sessions: average 2 hours per week 24 additional to reading time )

    Assessment Preparation 3 hours per week average 36

    Review and Evaluation (reading assessment feedback commentaries 5

    TOTAL INDEPENDENT LEARNING HOURS 140

    TOTAL STUDENT LEARNING HOURS (These must add up to 200 hours per 20 credits) 200

    INDICATIVE ASSESSMENT

    The methods of assessment for this module have been designed to test all the learning outcomes. Students must demonstrate successful achievement of these learning outcomes to pass the module.

    Size of Assessment, Number of % Learning Form of Duration, and/or AssessmentweightinOutcomes being Assessment Wordcount (indicative s g assessed only)

    1,000 words including

    synopsis of one scholarly Research 1 20% article, a literature search 2, 3, 4, 5 preparation exercise and an annotated

    bibliography

    1 Research paper 40% 2000 words 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

    1 Examination 40% 2 hours 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

    MODULE PASS REQUIREMENTS

    Students are required to pass all pieces of assessment at a minimum of 40%.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LEARNING SUPPORT MATERIAL

    Adell, Sandra. Double-Consciousness/Double Bind: Theoretical Issues in Twentieth-Century Black

    Literature. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1994.

    Balshaw, Maria, and Liam Kennedy, eds. Urban Space and Representation. London: Pluto, 2000.

    Barlowe, Jamie. The Scarlet Mob of Scribblers: Rereading Hester Prynne. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2000.

    Berkowitz, Gerald. American Drama of the Twentieth Century. London: Longman, 1992.

    Bigsby, C. W. E. A Critical Introduction to Twentieth-Century American Drama. Cambridge:

    Cambridge UP, 1982.

Bigsby, C. W. E. Modern American Drama 1945-2000. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.

    Bloom, Clive. American Drama. London: Palgrave, 1995.

    Bradbury, Malcolm. The Modern American Novel. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1992.

    Bradbury, Malcolm, and Richard Ruland. From Puritanism to Postmodernism. London: Routledge, 1991.

    Brooker, Peter. Modernism/Postmodernism. London: Longman, 1992.

    Chabot, C. Barry. Writers for the Nation: American Literary Modernism. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P,

    1997.

    Clayton, Jay. The Pleasures of Babel: Contemporary American Literature and Theory. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1993.

    Cologne-Brooks, Gavin, et al, eds. Writing and America. London: Longman, 1996.

    Corkin, Stanley. Realism and the Birth of the Modern United States: Cinema, Literature and Culture.

    Athens: U of Georgia P, 1995.

    A Critical Bibliography of American Literature Studies. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998.

    Fabre, Genevieve, and Robert O’Meally. History and Memory in African-American Culture. Oxford:

    Oxford UP, 1994.

    Fisher, Philip. Still the New World: American Literature in a Culture of Creative Destruction. Cambridge, MA; Harvard UP, 1999.

    Hart, James D. Oxford Companion to American Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1996.

    Hutner, Gordon, ed. American Literature, American Culture. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1999.

    Jarvis, Brian. Postmodern Cartographies: The Geographical Imagination in Contemporary American Culture. London: Pluto, 1998.

    Kalaidjian, Walter. American Culture Between the Wars: Revisionary Modernism and Postmodern Critique. New York: Columbia UP, 1993.

    Kostelanetz, Richard. Politics in the African American Novel. New York: Greenwood Press, 1991.

    Macdowell, Deborah E. Slavery and the Literary Imagination. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1990.

    Mitchell, Jeremy, and Richard Maidment. The United States in the Twentieth Century: Culture. London: Hodder, 1994.

    Nettles, Elsa. Language and Gender in American Fiction. London: Macmillan, 1997.

    Orr, Elaine Neil. Subject to Negotiation: Reading Feminist Criticism and American Women’s Fictions.

    Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1997.

    Ruoff, A., and Jerry Ward, eds. Redefining American Literary History. New York: MLA, 1990.

    Sollors, Werner. The Invention of Ethnicity. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1989.

    Sundquist, Eric. To Wake the Nations: Race in the Making of American Literature. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1994.

    Tallack, Douglas. Twentieth-Century America: The Intellectual and Cultural Context London: Longman, 1993.

    Web Resources

    JSTOR

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