DOC

Windows 7 and HomeGroup Downlevel Sharing

By Sandra Stevens,2015-03-22 15:31
66 views 0
WINDOWS 7 & HOMEGROUP SHARING WITH WINDOWS XP, WINDOWS VISTA & OTHER OPERATING SYSTEMS Abstract The purpose of this white paper is to explain how your computers that are running previous versions of Windows can access the files and printers shared with your homegroup on your computer(s) running Windows 7. HomeGroup takes the headache out of sharing fi..

    WINDOWS 7 & HOMEGROUP

    SHARING WITH WINDOWS XP, WINDOWS VISTA & OTHER OPERATING SYSTEMSAbstract

    The purpose of this white paper is to explain how your computers that are running previous versions of Windows can access the files

    and printers shared with your homegroup on your computer(s) running Windows 7.

    HomeGroup takes the headache out of sharing files and printers on a home network. It is a collection of two or more computers in the

    home that are automatically set up for easy sharing of music, pictures, video, and document libraries, as well as any connected printers

    with others in your home. It also allows you to stream media to devices.

    Version 1.0.0 – October 1, 2009

    The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date

    of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on

    the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.

    This White Paper is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT.

    Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of

    this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means

    (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of

    Microsoft Corporation.

    Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in

    this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does

    not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property.

    ; 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    Microsoft?, Windows?, Windows Vista?, Windows XP? are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

    Apple?, Mac?, and Mac OS? are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.Ubuntu? is a registered trademark of Canonical Ltd.

    Linux? is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the U.S. and other countries.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

?2009 Microsoft Corporation

    HomeGroup is a new feature in Windows? 7 that allows you to connect two or more computers running Windows 7 and easily share your Music, Pictures, Video, and Document libraries as well as printers with others in your home. HomeGroup also automatically sets up sharing so that all media shared with the homegroup is accessible from Windows Media Player, Windows Media Center, and other

    compatible media devices in the home. In addition to HomeGroup, Windows 7 continues to support all existing sharing functionality

    available since the Windows Vista? operating system, and it can also share with the Windows XP? operating system. Even though previous versions of Windows do not support HomeGroup, it is still possible to access all of your shared homegroup content with

    computers running previous versions of Windows and other operating systems. A general white paper on HomeGroup is available here.

    The purpose of this white paper is to explain how your computers that are running previous versions of Windows can access the files

    and printers shared with your homegroup on your computer(s) running Windows 7. Note that if you own multiple computers running Windows 7, this document is not required for you to share files and printers. All you need is to use the HomeGroup feature that is

    automatically enabled on your Windows 7 PCs. See this online help topic.

    This white paper covers the following tasks:

    ?Setting up your computer(s) running Windows 7 to enable access from other computers including:

    oComputers running previous versions of Windows

    ;Windows Vista

    ;Windows XP

    oAn Apple? computer running Mac OS? X operating system software

    oComputers running Ubuntu? Linux?

    ?Enabling previous versions of Windows to install printers shared with the homegroup on a computer running Windows 7. ?A brief overview of sharing from previous versions of Windows to Windows 7, and associated help links.Readers who encounter problems should also read the Troubleshooting section of this white paper, which covers some additional security and encryption requirements for sharing.

    WINDOWS LIBRARIES

    Libraries, a new feature in Windows 7, gather files from different locations into one place. Windows 7 allows users to share their

    libraries with others in their home using a homegroup. Every Windows 7 computer that is part of the homegroup is then able to view

    and access shared libraries in a seamless manner.

    It is important to note that Windows Vista and Windows XP do not provide support for sharing in the home using HomeGroup or libraries. As a result, when sharing between a computer running Windows 7 and a computer running a previous version of Windows,

    only folders will be visible. When sharing between computers running Windows 7, libraries and folders will be visible.For example, the Music library includes two folders by default: My Music and Public Music. If you share your Music library with a

    computer running Windows Vista or Windows XP, the library itself won’t be visible, but the folders included in it will. Note that

    individual folders can be shared between Windows 7 computers independently of libraries by sharing the folder with the homegroup.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

    This section discusses different ways to access homegroup data shared on a computer running Windows 7 from a computer not running Windows 7.

    To begin, make sure that your computer running Windows 7 is already part of a homegroup. If you set up your computer while on your home network, it is likely that your computer is already part of a homegroup. Open HomeGroup in Control Panel and make sure

    that you are sharing some libraries with the homegroup. If your computer isn’t part of a homegroup, go ahead and create one or join

    one, depending on what is displayed in the HomeGroup Control Panel. As an example, this is what the HomeGroup Control Panel looks like when you are part of a homegroup.

    Share more content with the Share With menu in Windows Explorer. You can control how others may access your shared content and what permissions they have when accessing the content as defined below:

    ?Homegroup (Read) – Your files cannot be changed; they can only be viewed and copied.

    ?Homegroup (Read/Write) – Your files can be changed, deleted, viewed, and copied, and new files can be created in the shared

    folder by others.

    ?Option 1: Using a password protected sharing account (Recommended option)

    oThis is the preferred way to enable sharing between Windows 7 computers and previous versions of Windows or

    other operating systems. Only users that know a specific user name and password can access the shared files,

    ensuring that you control who sees the shared data.

    oWhy make a special account just for sharing? If you make a special account, you can give the user name and password to

    anyone you want to share with the homegroup. If you don’t make a separate account, you’ll have to give out your

    personal user name and password in order to enable sharing. Additionally, all the data in your user account will also be

    accessible. Making a separate sharing account prevents this and ensures that only data that is shared with the homegroup

    is accessible.

    oWhen creating a user account solely for the purpose of sharing, it is recommended that you create it as a Standard user

    account and not an Administrative user. This provides even greater security when giving out the user name and password

    for the sharing user account to others because the account will not have any administrative rights on your computer.?Option 2: Synchronizing user accounts and passwords across all of your computers (Advanced users)

    oIf you are an advanced user, you might have set up all of your computers with the same user accounts and passwords.

    HomeGroup supports this, as everything you share with the homegroup is also shared with your user account. You can

    change the per-user setting “HomeGroup connections” in Advanced sharing settings in Control Panel to use your user

    account and password. When you connect to other computers (in your homegroup or just on your network), you will

    automatically authenticate with your user credentials instead of HomeGroup credentials and get access to all content

    shared with you as opposed to just the homegroup. This setting is only recommended for advanced users. ?Option 3: Disable password protected sharing and sharing data with “Everyone” (Not recommended)

    oThis will cause content shared with “Everyone” to be accessible by any anonymous user on your network.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

    oThis is not the preferred way of sharing as it can compromise the security of your data by providing access to

    anyone on your network.

    oIf required, you can disable the password protected sharing setting in Advanced sharing settings in Control Panel.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

SETTING UP A PASSWORD PROTECTED SHARING ACCOUNT

    This section will guide you through the process of setting up your computer running Windows 7 to allow access to shared data from

    other computers. After you complete this section, you will have created a new user account that you can use on your other computers

    to access content shared with the homegroup on this computer running Windows 7.

    On your computer running Windows 7:

    1.Click the Start button, type “user accounts” in the search box, and then click User Accounts and Family Safety.

    2.Click Add or remove user accounts, and then click Create a new account.

    3.Type a name for the new account, such as “share.”

    Note: For the rest of this document, the steps and screenshots refer to share as the account created specifically to allow

    access to homegroup shares.

    4.Click Standard user, and then click Create Account.

    5.Click the tile for the user account you just created, and then click Create a password.

    6.Enter a memorable password. Don’t use the same password you use for your computer account or for important

    websites such as banking websites. Unless you control all of the computers you want to share with, make it a password that

    you are comfortable giving out to people you trust.

    7.Type a password hint, and then click Create password.

    8.Log on as the user you created (for example, share), and then log off. (This is required so that the user account is created with

    the correct credentials.)

    9.Repeat these steps on every Windows 7 computer that you need to access from another operating system.

    Note: If desired, see the “Hiding the Sharing User Account from the Login Screen” section at the end of this white paper for

    instructions on removing this user name (for example, share) from the logon screen.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

    ACCESSING CONTENT SHARED WITH THE HOMEGROUP FROM COMPUTERS NOT RUNNING

    WINDOWS 7

    Make sure you know the user name and password of the sharing account you created in the section above (Setting up a password protected sharing account).

    If you are using a computer running Windows Vista or Windows XP, continue directly to that section below. If your computer is

    running Mac OS X or Ubuntu Linux, first write down the following information:The following steps explain how to gather some critical information for connecting to the computer running Windows 7.

    On the computer running Windows 7, find the computer name:

    1.Click the Start button, right-click Computer, and then click Properties.

    2.Write down the computer name.

    Get the computer’s IP address:

    1.Click the Start button, type “network” in the search box, and then click Network and Sharing Center.

    2.Next to “Connections,” click the link for your home network, and then click Details.

    3.Note the number next to “IPv4 Address” (usually 192.168.*.* or 10.*.*.*).You will need these three pieces of information below.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

USING WINDOWS VISTA TO ACCESS HOMEGROUP CONTENT

    If you have a computer running Windows Vista, follow these steps to access homegroup content shared by your computer running Windows 7.

    1.Click Start, click Network, and then double-click the computer you want to access.

    2. When prompted for credentials, use the user account and password you created earlier (for example, share).

    3.If you don’t want to be asked for a password every time you access the shared folder, click Remember my password.

    4.Click the Users share to access the files and folders that are shared with the homegroup.

    5.If desired, you can set up quick access to folders you want to access frequently by dragging the folder to the left pane, under

    Favorite Links. The folder will be saved as a favorite, and you can always access it from the Favorite Links area.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

USING WINDOWS XP TO ACCESS HOMEGROUP CONTENT

    If you have a computer running Windows XP, follow these steps to access homegroup content shared by your computer running

    Windows 7.

    1.Click Start, click My Computer, click My Network Places, and then click View workgroup computers.

    2.Double-click the computer you want to access.

    3.When prompted for credentials, use the user account and password you created earlier (for example, share).

    4.If desired, you can set up quick access to folders you want to access frequently by right-clicking the Users folder (or a

    subfolder) and then clicking Map Network Drive. Follow the instructions that appear.

    5.You can then access the mapped drive by clicking Start and then clicking My Computer. The folder will be listed under

    Network Drives.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

USING MAC OS X TO ACCESS HOMEGROUP CONTENT

    If you have an Apple computer and are using Mac OS X, follow these steps to access homegroup content shared by your computer

    running Windows 7.

    If the computer running Windows 7 appears under the Shared section in Finder, use the user name and password that you

    created earlier to connect to it.

    If the computer running Windows 7 doesn’t appear automatically in Finder:

    First review the following support article from Apple: http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Mac/10.5/en/8208.htmlIf that information doesn’t help you solve the problem, follow these steps:

    1.Open Finder.

    2.In the toolbar, click Go, and then click Connect to Server (or use keyboard shortcut Command +K).

    3.In OS X 10.3.x and later, click Browse, select the computer running Windows 7, and then click Connect. (Or follow the

    common instructions below.)

    4.In OS X 10.2.x, click the pull-down menu, select the computer running Windows 7, and then click Connect. (Or follow the

    common instructions below.)

    Common Instructions: In any OS X version, you can do the following:

    Note: Recall the computer name and IP address you collected from section Accessing content shared with the homegroup

    from computers not running Windows 7.

    1.Type smb://username@computername/users

    2.Connect as username and enter your password.

    Note: If the connection is unsuccessful, try using the IP address instead. For example, type the following:

    smb://username@ipaddress/users

    The computer running Windows 7 should now be available in Finder when you click Go and then click Network. The computer will

    also appear under Shared in Finder.

    ?2009 Microsoft Corporation

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com