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DISCOURSE ANALYSIS 12. LANGUAGE ACQUISITION 10. LANGUAGE: VARIATION AND CHANGE 6. MODERNISM 9. PAGE & STAGE: RENAISSANCE WRITINGS 1500-1640 8 ...

    School of Language & Literature

    Catalogue of

    Level 3 English Courses

    available for

    JUNIOR HONOURS STUDENTS

    Session 2010-11

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    The courses available in Level 3 English in Session 2010/11 are listed in this booklet.

    Groups: All courses in level 3 English will be in one of four

    groups. The figures that follow indicate which of the

    curricular requirements (explained in paragraphs 19

    to 24 of the twenty-second edition of the 'Guide to

    Honours' (2009)) are met by the course.

     Group 1 = literature and language before 1700

     Group 2 = literature and language 17001890

     Group 3 = literature and language after 1890

     Group 4 = language and linguistics courses

Course Codes: Codes beginning with EL30 are first semester

    courses (Slot A): codes beginning EL35 are

    second semester courses (Slot C).

    Teaching Slot A courses begin Monday 27th September 2010 Dates: Slot C courses begin Monday 31st January 2011

    Credit Points: Since Academic Year 2002/03 all University courses

    have been credit-rated using SCOTCAT credit

    points with, in most cases, 1 credit awarded in

    previous academic sessions now being equal to 5

    credit points. SCOTCAT = Scottish Credit

    Accumulation Transfer

    Note: Because there may be staff changes, illness, etc.,

    the School cannot guarantee that all the courses

    listed here will run, or will run at the time specified.

    TBA: To be advised

    Important: Some level 4 course have pre-requisites. When

    choosing level 3 courses please bear in mind that

    your choices may affect your options at level 4.

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    INDEX OF COURSES Page

Level 3 English Courses:

American Literature to 1900 4

    Chaucer 6

    Discourse Analysis 12

    Language Acquisition 10

    Language: Variation and Change 6

    Modernism 9

    Page & Stage: Renaissance Writings 1500-1640 8 Phonetics 5

    Romanticism 7

    Scottish Literature Into the Modern World: 1750-1900 11 States of Mind: Contemporary Irish and Scottish Writing 4 Victorianism: Literature, Art and Society 10 Writing Gender 8

Junior Honours

    Courses Listed By Group & Summary of Curricular 13 Requirements

    You are reminded that Single Honours students are permitted to take courses worth up to 30 credit points outwith their honours group,

    with the permission of the Programme Co-ordinator. Courses which

    might be considered include:

    LW3001 Literature and Art In Intellectual History

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    NOTE: ADMISSION TO ALL LEVEL 3 COURSES IS BY

    PERMISSION OF THE PROGRAMME CO-ORDINATOR

     ______________________________________________________

    SLOT A LEVEL 3 ENGLISH COURSES

     ______________________________________________________ EL30HH AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1900

    30 credit points: 12 weeks

    Group 2

    Course co-ordinator: Dr H Hutchison

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    This course covers American literature from colonial times to 1900, viewing the work of important writers against the backdrop of history. thThe focus of the course is the 19 century, a period of immense

    social and cultural upheaval in the United States which transformed a rural colony into a political and industrial giant. The course considers issues of gender, race and religion, and the search for and emergence of a distinctively American voice. Authors studied include Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and James.

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Mon/Thu at 1 1 two-hour examination (50%), In-course assessment: 1 essay (30%), group project (10%), and seminar work (10%).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

    ______________________________________________________

    EL30IG STATES OF MIND: CONTEMPORARY IRISH AND

    SCOTTISH WRITING

    30 credit points: 12 weeks

    Group 3

    Course co-ordinator: Dr S Alcobia-Murphy

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    The past two decades in Scotland and Ireland have witnessed a remarkable literary renaissance, not only resistant to metropolitan

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    literary and linguistic norms, but also to inherited notions of Scottish and Irish identity. New modes of urban writing, working-class writing and women's writing have altered the landscapes of Scottish and Irish literature. The course will examine a range of Scottish and Irish texts, adopting a comparative framework where appropriate, and focusing on such issues as: the role of writing in the construction of national identity; the relationship between nationality and gender; the literary use of non-standard language (demotic and synthetic Scots, Hiberno-English); regional identity and the urban/rural division; narrative voice; literature and politics. Writers to be studied will include Tom Leonard, James Kelman, Seamus Heaney, John Banville and Ciaran Carson.

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Tue/Fri at 9 1 two-hour examination (50%), In-course assessment: essay (30%), individual presentation (10%), and seminar work (10%). Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

     ______________________________________________________ EL30Jx PHONETICS

    30 credit points: 12 weeks

    Group 4

    Course Co-ordinators: Dr H Jiang

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above who have fulfilled the entry requirements to the Language and Linguistics Honours programme, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    This course focuses upon two areas of speech communication: speech acoustics the study of the sound signals passing between speaker and hearer, and auditory phonetics the processes by

    which these signals are perceived and understood by the hearer. Topics to be covered include speech production, basic acoustics, computerised methods for speech analysis, auditory system, and speech perception. Students will learn to use speech analysis software to analyze speech data, and will become familiar with theories of speech production and perception.

    1 two-hour lecture per fortnight; 1 two-hour seminar per fortnight (alternating with lectures); 1 two-hour laboratory practical per fortnight.

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    Assessment: 1 two-hour written examination (45%), In-course assessment: 1 homework exercise (22.5%), 1 homework test (22.5%), and seminar assessment mark essay (10%). Mon/Thu at 9 Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%)

     ______________________________________________________ EL30LQ LANGUAGE: VARIATION AND CHANGE

     30 credit points: 12 weeks

     Group 4

    Course co-ordinator: Dr R McColl Millar

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above who have fulfilled the entry requirements to the Language and Linguistics Honours programme, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    Note: The field work aspects of this course may pose difficulties to students with disabilities. For such students, alternative arrangements will be made available. Any student wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Officer. One of the universals of human life is that language is subject to change. Underlying much of this change is the fact that the form of all living languages varies from speaker to speaker. Sociolinguistics studies the way class, ethnic background and gender affect the way you speak and the way others perceive your speech. Historical Linguistics attempts to find significant patterns in the same variation and change found in the past. This course introduces the basic principles of both Sociolinguistics and Historical Linguistics. In order to illustrate these principles, reference will be made to case studies, both historical and contemporary. You will also be encouraged to participate in small-scale research and fieldwork projects.

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Mon/Thu at 9 1 two-hour written examination (50%), In-course assessment: 2,000-2500 word essay (30%), group presentation (10%), and seminar work (10%).

    Re-sit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

    ______________________________________________________

    EL30WB CHAUCER

     30 credit points: 12 weeks

     Group 1

    Course co-ordinator: Professor D Hughes

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    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    The fourteenth century is the greatest period in the early history of literature in English, and Chaucer is the greatest English author prior to Shakespeare, exercising an enormous influence on subsequent literature, right up to the present day. His most important works are the long narrative poem Troilus and Criseyde, which will be studied

    in its entirety, and The Canterbury Tales, of which by far the greater

    part will be read. The course will introduce students to the first major flowering of English culture, in a period marked by decisive social, political, and economic change, caused (for example) by the Black Death, the Hundred Years’ War, and changes in the patterns of manufacture and trade.

    1 one-hour lecture followed by 1 one-hour language class, and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Tue/Fri at 1

    (NB: An additional seminar group will run on Thursdays at 1) 1 two-hour examination (50%), In-course assessment: essay (30%), project and presentation (10%), and seminar work (10%). Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

    ______________________________________________________

    EL30XR ROMANTICISM

     30 credit points: 12 weeks

     Group 2

    Course co-ordinator: Dr D Duff

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    The Romantic period (1789-1830) was a turning point in literary history which transformed received modes of writing, redefined the role of literature, and gave new prominence to ideas of originality, imagination, creativity and self-expression. This course explores these fascinating developments, particularly in poetry. The first half concentrates on the work of Blake, Coleridge and Wordsworth, and examines the emergence of the revolutionary aesthetic of Romanticism in the context of the social and political upheavals of the ‘Age of Revolution’. The second half focuses on the ‘second-

    generation’ Romantic poets Shelley, Byron and Keats, but also pays

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    attention to outstanding prose writers of the period including the essayists De Quincey, Hazlitt and Lamb and the novelists Jane Austen and Mary Shelley.

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Mon/Thu at 3 1 two-hour examination (50%), In-course assessment: essay (30%), group project (10%), and seminar work (10%).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

    SLOT C LEVEL 3 ENGLISH COURSES

EL35CT PAGE & STAGE: RENAISSANCE WRITINGS 1500-1640

    30 credit points: 12 weeks

    Group 1

    Course co-ordinator: Dr A Gordon

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    The Renaissance has been widely considered the golden age of English literature, producing such towering literary figures as Shakespeare, Jonson and Marlowe, and presenting mingled views of the erotic, the political, the religious and the lyrical while even laying claim to England's first 'novels'. Taking in poetry, drama and prose, this course presents a wide and contrasting range of writings which illustrate its authors' diverse interests: the court, the country, the city and - above all - love; or should that be 'sex'?

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Mon/Thu at 11 1 two-hour examination (40%), In-course assessment: 2 essays (25% each), and seminar work (10%).

    Re-sit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

EL35DN WRITING GENDER

    30 credit points: 12 weeks

    Group 4

    Course co-ordinator: Professor J King

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    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    Since the rise of the women’s movement in the 1960s, and the subsequent growth of feminist criticism, it has become almost impossible to talk about literature without paying some regard to gender issues. Looking at a range of twentieth-century texts by both male and female writers from different national cultures, this course will consider the role of literary texts in both constructing and deconstructing gender roles. It will also consider the concept of gendered writing. Since definitions of sexual identity are central to the course, texts which question the stability of that identity, such as lesbian and gay writing, will be used in addition to canonical texts. A variety of critical approaches will be used, including Elaine Showalter’s concept of the ‘wild zone’, Judith Butler’s view of gender as ‘performative’ and the French feminist concept of écriture

    feminine. Texts studied will include: poetry of the first world war, Jackie Kay, Trumpet, and Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body.

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Mon/Thu at 1 1 two-hour examination (40%), In-course assessment: 1 essay (40%), group project (10%), and seminar work (10%).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

EL35MG MODERNISM

     30 credit points: 12 weeks

     Group 3

    Course co-ordinator: Dr T Baker

    Pre-requisite(s) Available only to students in programme year 3 or above who have passed 60 credit points in level 2 English courses, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    This course in Modernist literature examines a selection of the best literature from the early years of the twentieth century. Seven major authors are represented by works which illustrate the characteristics of Modernism, and a further aim of the course is to convey a sense of the period and of the social and intellectual context in which the texts were written. Authors studied will include: Joseph Conrad, Thomas Mann, D H Lawrence, T S Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and W B Yeats.

    1 two-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week: Mon/Thu at 3

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    st1 two-hour written examination (30%), In-course assessment: 1 ndessay (20%), 2 essay (30%), group presentation (10%), and

    seminar work (10%).

    Re-sit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

    ______________________________________________________

    stndEL35NG 1 and 2 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

    30 credit points: 12 weeks

    Course Co-ordinators: TBA

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above who have fulfilled the entry requirements to the Language and Linguistics programme, or by permission of the Programme Co-ordinator.

    How children and adults learn language has been the topic of much debate within linguistics. This course will focus on some of the main theories of language learning and introduce students to research in first and second language acquisition. It will answer questions such as: when do children first start learning language? How do they go from babbling to one word sentences to the full complexity of adult grammar in a span of merely a few years? How do the brains of people who learn two languages simultaneously differ from those who learn a second language later on in life? What are some of the causes of the speech errors we find in second language learners? How can using a second language influence the way we use our native language?

    1 two-hour seminar and 1 one-hour lecture per week. Mon/Thu at 9 In-course assessment: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), essay (30%), group presentation (10%), and seminar assessment mark (10%).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

EL35PN VICTORIANISM: LITERATURE, ART AND SOCIETY

     30 credit points: 12 weeks

     Group 2

Course co-ordinator(s): TBA

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