DOC

CAP DDRP Lesson Plan

By Tony Coleman,2014-03-15 23:01
20 views 0
CAP DDRP Lesson Plan

    Civil Air Patrol Drug Demand Reduction

    Program

    Lesson 11

    Club Drugs

This Lesson Plan Produced By Your Drug Demand Reduction Program

    Club Drugs

    PART I

    GENERAL INFORMATION

    LESSON OBJECTIVES: The objective of this lesson is for each member to: 1. Better understand the difference between some of the different types of club drugs. 2. Be able to spot some of the signs that young people may be using a club drug.

    DESIRED LEARNING OUTCOMES: Upon completion of this lesson, each member will: 1. Have information on three specific club drugs and their effects. 2. Recognize some of the indications of the effects of the three club drugs.

LENGTH OF LESSON: 30 35 minutes

METHOD: Lecture and Discussion

REFERENCES:

    1. GHB, Rohypnol and Ketamine (National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA))

    2. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration

VISUAL AIDS/HANDOUTS/ACTIVITY MATERIALS: 29 Animated Slides

READINGS:

    1. GHB, Rohypnol and Ketamine (National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA))

    2. U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration

WEBSITES: www.drugfree.org

    www.dea.gov

KEYS TO IMPLEMENTING LESSON OBJECTIVES: Familiarize oneself with the

    differences of club drugs and how they are related. Become familiar with the dangers and what using any of the club drugs will do to your body. Also, review applicable websites for additional

    information.

    1

    Club Drugs

    PART II

    LESSON PLAN

    INTRODUCTION

SLIDE 1 CLUB DRUGS

Club drugs are being used by young adults at all-night dance parties such as “raves” or “trances,

    and dance clubs and bars. MDMA (ecstasy), GHB, rohypnol, ketamine, methamphetamine and LSD are some of the club or party drugs gaining popularity. The use of club drugs can cause serious health problems. For this lesson, we will cover only GHB, rohypnol, and ketamine. MDMA (ecstasy), LSD and methamphetamine are covered in other lessons.

    BODY

SLIDE 2 WHAT IS GHB?

    GBH (gamma-butyrolactone with sodium hydroxide mix) is predominantly a central nervous system depressant.

SLIDE 3 WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?

    GHB can be produced in clear liquid, white powder, tablet, and capsule forms. It is colorless and odorless. GHB has a salty taste; however, it is often diluted in liquids and virtually undetectable. GHB is often manufactured in homes with recipes and kits found and purchased on the Internet.

SLIDE 4 HOW IT APPEARS

    2

    Club Drugs

    SLIDE 5 WHAT ARE SOME OF THE SIGNS THAT A PERSON IS USING GBH?

    Used in liquid form, GHB comes in a wide variety of concentrations with a single dose ranging from a few drops to a full glass. Used in powder form, measuring a dose is fairly straightforward.

SLIDE 6 SHORT-TERM EFFECTS

    At lower doses, GHB can relieve anxiety and produce relaxation. Combining its use with other drugs such as alcohol can result in nausea and difficulty in breathing. GHB may also produce withdrawal effects, including insomnia, anxiety, tremors, and sweating.

SLIDE 7 LONG-TERM EFFECTS

As the dose increases, the sedative effects may result in sleep and eventual coma or death. GHB

    has reportedly been used in cases of date rape. Because GHB is odorless and tasteless, it can be slipped into someone's drink without detection.

SLIDE 8 WHAT IS THE DEA FEDERAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEDULE FOR GBH?

    GBH is listed as a DEA Federal Classification Schedule I drug, meaning that it is in the group of the most highly addictive drugs.

SLIDE 9 WHAT IS ROHYPNOL?

    Rohypnol is the brand name for a drug called flunitrazepam, which is a powerful sedative that depresses the central nervous system. Rohypnol is not legally available for prescription in the United States, but is legal in 60 countries worldwide for treatment of insomnia.

SLIDE 10 WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?

Rohypnol is a small white tablet with no taste or odor when dissolved in a drink. It is frequently

    used in combination with alcohol and other drugs and when it is used with alcohol can produce disinhibition and amnesia. Sometimes taken to enhance a heroin high, or to mellow or ease the experience of coming down from a cocaine or crack high.

    3

    Club Drugs

    SLIDE 11 HOW IT APPEARS

SLIDE 12 SOME SHORT-TERM EFFECTS

    The drug creates a sleepy, relaxed, and drunk feeling that lasts two to eight hours. Other effects may include blackouts with a compete loss of memory, dizziness and disorientation, nausea, difficulty with motor movements and speaking.

SLIDE 13 SOME LONG-TERM EFFECTS

Rohypnol can produce physical and psychological dependence.

SLIDE 14 WHAT IS THE DEA FEDERAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEDULE FOR

    ROHYPNOL?

    Rohypnol is listed as a DEA Federal Classification Schedule IV drug, which is based on amount in possession and previous offenses.

SLIDE 15 WHAT IS KETAMINE?

    Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic developed in 1963 to replace PCP. Its chemical structure and mechanism of action are similar to those of PCP. It is currently used in human anesthesia and veterinary medicine. Much of the ketamine sold on the street has been diverted from veterinarian offices.

SLIDE 16 HOW IS IT USED?

    Ketamine can be snorted or swallowed and is odorless and tasteless. It can be added to beverages without being detected. It is sometimes given to unsuspecting victims and can induce amnesia. It is used in sexual assaults and referred to as “date rape” drug.

SLIDE 17 WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?

    Although it is manufactured as an injectable liquid, for illicit use, ketamine is generally evaporated to form a powder.

    4

    Club Drugs

    SLIDE 18 HOW IT APPEARS

SLIDE 19 WHAT ARE SOME OF THE SIGNS THAT A PERSON IS USING

    KETAMINE?

    Impaired attention, learning ability and memory are all indication of low-dose intoxication. Delirium, amnesia, impaired motor function, high blood pressure depression and potentially fatally respiratory problems all indicate high dosage intoxication.

SLIDE 20 SHORT-TERM EFFECTS

    Ketamine can cause dream-like states and hallucinations. Users report sensations ranging from a pleasant feeling of floating to being separated from their bodies. Some ketamine experiences involve a terrifying feeling of almost complete sensory detachment that is likened to a near-death experience. These experiences, similar to a "bad trip" on LSD, are called the "K-hole." Low-dose intoxication from ketamine results in impaired attention, learning ability, and memory.

SLIDE 21 LONG-TERM EFFECTS

DEA has not provided any long-term effects for ketamine.

SLIDE 22 WHAT IS THE DEA FEDERAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEDULE FOR

    KETAMINE?

    Ketamine is listed as a DEA Federal Classification Schedule III drug and has a stimulant effect on the central nervous system.

SLIDE 23 PENALTIES FOR POSSESSION

    The following penalties range from DEA Federal Classification Schedules I through IV:

Penalties for First Offense: 3 to 20 years.

    Penalties for Second Offense: 6 to 30 years.

    5

    Club Drugs

    SLIDE 24 AS A MEMBER OF CAP, WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO IS USING CLUB DRUGS?

Since not all CAP units are staffed with the same duty positions, you should notify one of the

    following: Deputy Commander for Cadets/Cadet Programs Officer, Chaplain/Moral Leadership

    Officer, or Unit Commander.

SLIDE 25 WHY DO PEOPLE USE CLUB DRUGS?

Don’t realize someone has slipped something in their drink. They don’t care what happens. To

    lose their inhibitions. To have a “good time. To do what the others are doing.

    SLIDE 26 WHAT ARE SOME OF THE WAYS YOU CAN SAY “NO” TO DRUGS WITHOUT ISOLATING YOURSELF?

    I don’t care for any. I’m not into that scene. Do what? You’ve got to be kidding! I have more respect for myself than that!

    6

    Club Drugs

    PART III

    CONCLUSION

SLIDE 27 SUMMARY

    Club drugs are serious business. They cause things to happen that you cannot remember. Some of the club drugs are called “date rape” drugs. You may experience anything from difficulty

    breathing, withdrawal effects, including insomnia, anxiety, tremors, sweating or blackouts, a compete loss of memory, dizziness and disorientation, nausea, difficulty with motor movements and speaking, and even death. Are a few hours of “fun” worth all this? Is losing your life worth it? You can have fun and not be part of the “drug crowd.” Stop and think about what you will be doing to yourself if you take drugs. It’s not worth it!

SLIDE 28 LESSON PLAN RESOURCES

U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is available at www.dea.gov, and GHB, Rohypnol and

    Ketamine (National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)) is available at www.drugfree.org. They

    are only two of the numerous websites available to all interested parties that are facing a decision about life altering use of club drugs or to learn about the various types of drugs.

SLIDE 29 DON’T MARCH WITH THESE GUYS, SAY NO TO DRUGS!

Dead Men Walking.

    7

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com