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DRAFT APPROACH PAPER OF SPORTS BUREAU

By Douglas Patterson,2015-03-08 10:50
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DRAFT APPROACH PAPER OF SPORTS BUREAU

    Report of the

    Working Group on

    SPORTS AND

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    For

    th11 Five Year Plan (2007-2012)

    Government of India

    Planning Commission

    New Delhi

    DRAFT APPROACH PAPER OF SPORTS BUREAU

    FOR XITH FIVE YEAR PLAN

    INDEX

I. INTRODUCTION:

    1.1 Background

    1.2 Evolution of Sports Policy

    1.3 Studies/Reports

    1.4 Programme Initiatives under Five Year Plans

II. XTH PLAN PERFORMANCE REVIEW:

    III. PERSPECTIVE & APPROACH FOR XITH PLAN

    3.1 Current Sports Scenario

    3.2 Approach & Strategy of the XIth Plan

    IV. RECOMMENDED MEASURES FOR XITH PLAN:

V. PROPOSED FINANCIAL OUTLAY:

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    DRAFT APPROACH PAPER OF SPORTS BUREAU

    FOR XITH FIVE YEAR PLAN

    “India is a young nation. India is a nation of young people. Our youth are ready to work hard for a bright future…They want to build a new India. We must build a new

    India of their dreams. I want every one of our youth to walk shoulder to shoulder, and walk forward with us in building a new India. Every young person must have faith in our future. To know that this country will create opportunities for all for the full expression of their talent and skill.” PM’s Independence Day Speech, 2006.

    “Be strong my young friends, that is my advice to you. You will be nearer to heaven through football than through the study of the Gita.” - Swami Vivekananda. th (The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda, Vol. III, p.242 9Edition, 1964)

    “Every human being has a fundamental right of access to physical education and sport, which are essential for the full development of his personality. The freedom to develop physical, intellectual and moral powers through physical education and sport must be guaranteed both within the educational system and in other aspects of social life.” International Charter of Physical Education and Sport, UNESCO 1978.

    I. INTRODUCTION

    1.1 Background: Sports and Games as a vital component of social and cultural life are embedded in the Indian heritage, and can be found in the archaeological excavations of Mohenjodaro and Harappa, the Vedic literature, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, the Puranas, the literary works of Kautilya, Kalidasa, Panini and Dandin, as well as in Buddhist and Jain literature. They had been seen as an intrinsic component of education and development of the human personality in the philosophical texts of ancient Greece, the progenitor of the Olympic movement. Every civilization has evolved and developed its own indigenous modes of physical endeavour and healthy social interaction through a variety of games and sports forms and events. Apart from being a means of physical exercise and fitness, sports and games have been a medium of entertainment, the generation of a spirit of healthy competition, bonding and pride in the community, and an avenue of constructive preoccupation for active young people.

    1.1.1 In the modern times, there has been an increasing recognition, at the global level, of the role of sports in development per se. The United Nations brought the theme of „Sport for Development and Peace‟ into its agenda in 2001, and issued an

    inter-agency report in 2003 showing how sports can assist in the achievement of the

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    Millennium Development Goals. Following this report, the General Assembly adopted Resolution 58/5 proclaiming 2005 as International Year of Sport & Physical Education (IYSPE 2005), thus giving a strong impetus to efforts to more fully integrate sports into the development agenda. A series of deliberations/programmes/activities involving governments, the private sector, civil society and UN agencies during the year identified sports as: i) being integral to quality education with mandatory physical education recognized in a number of countries as a universal pillar to foster education, health and personal development; ii) improving the health standards of the population; iii) achieving sustainable development; and iv) building lasting peace.

    1.1.2 The above developments, inter alia, serve to highlight the particular importance of sports as a vital ingredient of the development of youth and children in terms of their education, health and fitness and fostering positive values among them, and the special significance of this when seen in the context of India‟s demographic profile wherein persons below the age of 35 years constitute nearly 75 per cent of the population the

    “Young India” referred to by the Hon‟ble Prime Minister in his Independence Day Address. In terms of the imperatives of policy, and priorities for planning and action, this finds expression in the restructured Twenty Point Programme 2006, in which one of the monitorable items under Point No. XIII (entitled „Yuva Vikas‟), Item No. 48 is “Sports for All in Rural and Urban areas”.

    1.1.3 In terms of the competitive aspects of sports also, there has, over the years, been a sea change, in terms of the manner in which they are played, practiced and perceived at the national and international levels. The standards and levels of endurance, fitness and performance displayed by sportspersons have improved exponentially, the number of competitive sports disciplines has increased with the inclusion of many games indigenous to various regions of the world and, with the massive growth and sophistication in the spheres of media and communications, the visibility of competitive sports has grown enormously. In tandem with these trends, there has been increasing emphasis on the creation of high quality infrastructure and employment of sophisticated technology in the conduct of sports events, with a great deal of attention being given to the development of advanced scientific and technical support systems for sportspersons. With all this, sports as an area of activity, has acquired vast new dimensions, with multi-

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