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ModelTestTen

By Dolores Hawkins,2014-04-16 16:35
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ModelTestTen

Model Test Ten

    [00:09.70]Part ? Listening Comprehension

    [00:13.48]Section A

    [00:15.08]Directions:

    [00:16.31]In this section,

    [00:17.69]you will hear 8 short conversations [00:20.76]and 2 long conversations.

    [00:23.33]At the end of each conversation, [00:25.81]one or more questions will be asked [00:28.21]about what was said.

    [00:30.01]Both the conversation and the questions [00:32.69]will be spoken only once.

    [00:35.66]After each question there will be a pause. [00:38.96]During the pause, you must read the four choices [00:42.42]marked A), B), C) and D),

    [00:45.35]and decide which is the best answer. [00:48.68]Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2

    [00:52.46]with a single line through the centre. [00:55.27]Now let’s begin with the 8 short conversations. [01:00.65]11. M: Mom, I’m not feeling well.

    [01:04.93]My stomach aches.

    [01:06.50]I can hardly stand the pain. Ouch! [01:10.57]W: Have you eaten anything bad, honey? [01:13.48]Oh, you look so pale. You must go and see the doctor.

    [01:17.34]Q: What are they going to do?

    [01:35.72]12. W: Who do you think should get the job? [01:39.18]How about Mr. Johnson?

    [01:41.03]M: Mr. Johnson?

    [01:42.52]I’m not sure.

    [01:43.86]He is a nice fellow, of course, [01:46.72]and easy to get along with.

    [01:48.60]But I doubt his professional expertise. [01:51.69]I think Ms. Brown is better.

    [01:53.97]I mean, she is cut out for it. [01:56.63]Q: What are the two speakers talking about? [02:15.19]13. M: Rich people don’t use violence to steal.

    [02:19.96]They use computers and lawyers. [02:22.23]W: At least a computer won’t shoot and kill people.

    [02:25.33]I think violent crime is more horrible [02:28.02]than white-collar crime.

    [02:29.65]Q: What do they talk about?

    [02:46.70]14. W: Edward, can you drive me home after work today?

    [02:51.91]My car broke down this morning, [02:53.76]and it’s still in the garage.

[02:55.60]M: I’m sorry.

    [02:56.72]I have a date with Kate at dinnertime. [02:59.30]Maybe you can ask Allen.

    [03:01.29]He is showing off his new Farrari lately. [03:03.81]He would be glad to send you home. [03:06.03]Q: How will the woman go home today probably? [03:24.87]15. M: I’m told that Alice is trying to find a job

    [03:29.87]in an electronics company

    [03:31.89]W: As far as I know,

    [03:33.29]she is good at anything but electronics. [03:36.73]Q: What does the woman imply?

    [03:54.69]16. M: Do I look good?

    [03:57.71]I mean, will the interviewers like my clothes? [04:00.56]I want to give them a good impression. [04:03.19]W: You look great, honey.

    [04:04.65]Remember, be yourself.

    [04:06.41]Anyway, they are looking for someone [04:08.75]who knows how to run an apartment, not a model. [04:12.03]Q: What can we know about the man? [04:30.75]17. W: You can’t just decide

    [04:33.97]to start hammering things into walls. [04:36.49]You need to get permission first. [04:38.68]Have you checked with the landlord? [04:40.92]M: Calm down. I got his number from Helen, [04:44.69]gave him a call and he gave me the thumb up. [04:47.64]Q: What does the man mean?

    [05:05.83]18. M: The movie is really exciting. [05:10.60]Authentic explosions, spectacular car chases, [05:14.67]excellent special effects,

    [05:16.64]and kung fu, you know,

    [05:18.44]that’s my favorite part.

    [05:20.08]How do you like it?

    [05:21.40]W: I am wondering

    [05:22.67]why I let you talk me into going. [05:25.41]I really should have chosen to stay at home [05:27.90]and watch TV.

    [05:29.61]Q: What does the woman think of the movie? [05:48.20]Now you will hear the 2 long conversations. [05:51.96]Conversation One

    [05:53.50]W: Well, I’m going to the National Museum of Art.

    [05:57.08]M: Sure. Hop in.

    [05:59.13]W: Uh, how long does it take to get there? [06:01.51]M: Well, that all depends on the traffic, [06:03.98]but it shouldn’t take more than twenty minutes

[06:06.27]for the average taxi driver.

    [06:08.14]And I’m not average.

    [06:09.83]I have been driving down to an art, so we should be able to cruise through traffic [06:14.70]and get there in less than twelve minutes. [06:17.25]W: Okay. Uh, sorry for asking,

    [06:20.26]but do you have any idea how much the fare will be? [06:23.00]M: Oh, it shouldn’t be more than 18 dollars . . .

    [06:26.36]not including a . . . uh-hum . . .

    [06:28.07]a tip of course.

    [06:29.99]W: Oh, and by the way,

    [06:32.37]do you know what time the museum closes? [06:35.08]M: Well, I would guess around 6:00 o’clock.

    [06:38.05]And it’s 4:30 now.

    [06:40.02]Uh, this is your first time to the city, right? [06:43.21]W: Yeah. How did you know?

    [06:45.55]M: Well, you can tell tourists from a mile away [06:48.18]in this city because they walk down the street [06:50.42]looking straight up at the skyscrapers. [06:52.99]W: Was it that obvious?

    [06:54.57]M: Well . . .

    [06:55.76]W: Oh, before I forget,

    [06:57.36]can you recommend any good restaurants downtown [07:00.14]that offer meals at a reasonable price? [07:02.47]M: Well, the Mexican restaurant, La Fajita, [07:06.35]is fantastic.

    [07:07.72]It’s not as inexpensive as other places I know,

    [07:11.06]but the environment is quite pleasing, [07:13.84]and the portions are larger than most places [07:15.96]I’ve been to.

    [07:17.02]W: Sounds great!

    [07:18.53]How do I get there from the museum? [07:20.70]M: Well, you can catch the subway right [07:23.04]outside the museum.

    [07:24.48]There are buses that run that way,

    [07:26.65]but you would have to transfer a couple of times. [07:29.41]And there are taxis too,

    [07:31.53]but they don’t run by the museum that often.

    [07:34.33]So I strongly recommend you to take the subway. [07:37.45]W: Thanks for your advice.

    [07:40.19]Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation [07:43.60]you have just heard.

    [07:45.64]19. How does the driver know

    [07:48.34]that the passenger is a first-time visitor to the city?

    [08:07.22]20. What can we know about La Fajita [08:11.37]according to the conversation?

    [08:27.82]21. How will the woman probably go to the restaurant [08:32.70]from the museum?

    [08:49.78]Conversation Two

    [08:51.32]W: Dad, are you going to miss me [08:53.44]when I leave for college next week? [08:55.82]M: Of course, I will.

    [08:57.69]I’m proud of you for that.

    [08:59.55]Did you pay your tuition and housing fees by the deadline?

    [09:03.34]Because, you know, if you don’t,

    [09:05.41]you’ll lose your class schedule,

    [09:07.30]and you have to register all over again. [09:09.38]W: Yeah, I paid for that a few days ago. [09:11.79]M: Okay, did you sign up for the meal plan at the university

    [09:14.53]so you don’t have to eat instant noodles everyday? [09:17.33]W: Yeah. But Mom said I could take some food from home [09:20.30]to get me started.

    [09:21.50]M: That’s brilliant.

    [09:22.73]And you must have selected your future classes, right? [09:25.37]You know,

    [09:26.13]business administration will be a great major for you. [09:29.07]W: Well, Dad, I changed my major. [09:31.40]M: What? You switched majors?

    [09:33.89]W: Yeah. After talking it over with Mom, [09:36.80]I’ve decided to major in wildlife science.

    [09:40.07]M: What? I mean, why?

    [09:42.59]W: Dad, I’ve always been interested in working with nature,

    [09:46.18]and you know that;

    [09:47.30]this field will give me the opportunity [09:49.69]to live out my dream.

    [09:51.22]And I actually qualify for a two-year, [09:53.85]full tuition scholarship.

    [09:56.63]M: Well, I didn’t expect that.

    [09:59.60]Since you’re interested in it, just do it.

    [10:02.25]W: Thank you, Dad.

    [10:03.91]There’s another thing where I need your support.

    [10:06.18]I was planning to buy a laptop to help with my study, [10:09.87]but I didn’t have enough money.

    [10:11.83]M: How much will it cost?

    [10:13.64]W: My ideal type is $800. I have saved $450 [10:18.78]through part-time jobs,

    [10:20.17]and I’m still working on it.

    [10:21.80]M: Well, I think I can make it up for you.

    [10:24.65]And that will be a gift for your enrollment. [10:27.63]W: Thank you, Dad.

    [10:28.66]I love you.,

    [10:29.70]Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation [10:33.59]you have just heard.

    [10:36.70]22. What will happen

    [10:39.40]if the woman doesn’t pay her tuition by the deadline?

    [10:57.75]23. Where will the woman have meals [11:01.11]at the beginning of her campus life? [11:18.47]24. What job will the woman probably do [11:22.47]after her graduation according to her major? [11:40.67]25. How will the woman pay for her laptop? [12:00.01]Section B

    [12:01.78]Directions:

    [12:02.78]In this section,

    [12:03.76]you will hear 3 short passages.

    [12:06.26]At the end of each passage,

    [12:08.16]you will hear some questions.

    [12:10.37]Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once.

    [12:14.88]After you hear a question,

    [12:17.19]you must choose the best answer from the four choices [12:20.46]marked A), B), C) and D).

    [12:23.32]Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 [12:27.44]with a single line through the centre. [12:30.13]Passage One

    [12:31.80]Britain’s Dean Durrant and his wife Alison Spooner

    [12:35.67]are the luckiest people in the world [12:38.20]because they produced two sets of [12:40.87]“black-and-white twins”

    [12:42.52]within seven years.

    [12:44.33]A mixed-race couple

    [12:46.00]who had one black

    [12:47.27]and one white twin daughter seven years ago [12:50.44]have described how they defied the odds [12:53.35]and did it again.

    [12:55.26]The newly-born twins were named Miya and Leah respectively.

    [13:00.55]Miya has her father’s black skin

    [13:02.91]and Leah is white like her mother. [13:05.88]When the first set of twins arrived in 2001, [13:09.68]the couple were astonished to see that blue-eyed, [13:12.46]red-haired Lauren takes after her mother [13:16.10]while the older sibling Hayleigh has black skin [13:19.49]and black hair like her father.

    [13:21.54]Alison Spooner told Sky News,

[13:24.62]“I honestly didn’t think it would happen again.

    [13:27.86]I thought we would have two the same, [13:30.17]either black or white,

    [13:31.73]and I didn’t think we would have twins again for a start.

    [13:35.68]That was a shock.”

    [13:37.41]Mr. Durrant said he began to suspect [13:40.31]they were different colors when second-born Miya arrived.

    [13:44.31]He explained,

    [13:44.96]“I was sure in my mind there was a difference

    [13:48.11]but I didn’t think it was

    [13:49.99]as much as with Hayleigh and Lauren, [13:52.29]but obviously it is.”

    [13:54.22]Miya and Leah were delivered at Frimley Park Hospital [13:57.97]at just 37 weeks of pregnancy.

    [14:01.56]The babies were taken to a special care unit [14:04.38]because they were not breathing properly [14:06.96]so it took five days for the parents [14:09.21]to see them side by side.

    [14:11.33]Carol Cooper, author of a book on twins, [14:14.64]said there was a two in a million chance [14:17.25]of a second set of twins

    [14:18.92]like the Durrant girls.

    [14:22.09]Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage [14:25.01]you have just heard.

    [14:26.91]26. What can we know about the couple from the passage? [14:46.78]27. What is the right order of the Durrant girls [14:50.95]from the oldest to the youngest?

    [15:08.31]28. What was wrong with the newly-born babies? [15:27.15]Passage Two

    [15:29.36]Of all the methods of discovering new ideas, [15:32.78]Disney during the Eisner years

    [15:35.21]had one of the most unconventional. [15:38.21]Modeled after a 1970s television program, [15:41.79]Disney’s “Gong Show” was a big hit

    [15:44.57]with managers and ordinary employees alike. [15:48.09]Three times a year,

    [15:49.83]Eisner and two of his top assistants [15:52.44]would devote a day to listening

    [15:54.96]to anybody and everybody

    [15:57.04]secretaries, set designers,

    [15:58.74]theme park employees

    [16:00.26]who wanted to propose an idea.

    [16:02.89]As many as 40 people were allowed to perform, [16:06.22]present or otherwise sell their idea

    [16:08.99]until a loud gong would signal that time was up. [16:12.97]Then, after all the ideas were expressed, [16:16.03]Eisner and his managers would discuss each one [16:18.97]and make a decision.

    [16:21.92]According to Peter Schneider,

    [16:23.64]president of Disney features at the time, [16:26.24]most of Disney’s cartoon movies originated

    [16:28.85]from these sessions,

    [16:30.53]as did the idea for Disney’s retail stores.

    [16:33.70]Most organizations don’t invite ideas with such insight.

    [16:37.51]Nor do they give instant feedback [16:39.72]or make quick “yes or no” decisions.

    [16:42.70]“In most companies

    [16:44.48]there is no obvious strategy for selecting [16:47.01]or even evaluating ideas,”

    [16:49.28]concludes the American Management Association’s survey

    [16:53.15]of 1,356 global managers.

    [16:56.65]Nearly half of respondents reported [16:59.04]that their firms “don’t have a standard policy

    [17:01.70]for evaluating ideas”.

    [17:03.93]And only 17% said

    [17:06.02]they use an independent review process [17:08.29]to evaluate ideas.

    [17:10.35]An effective,

    [17:11.99]transparent selection process is essential [17:14.76]to systematic innovation.

    [17:16.87]Without one,

    [17:17.94]ideas have no path toward gaining funding [17:20.53]and resources and implementation. [17:23.19]An established review process invites participation by those

    [17:27.21]whose job is not specifically innovation. [17:30.29]It connects your “idea funnel” to your “idea pipeline”

    [17:33.95]and accelerates the flow of ideas. [17:37.84]Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage [17:40.50]you have just heard.

    [17:42.49]29. Why did Disney have the “Gong Show”?

    [18:01.43]30. What do we learn about Eisner? [18:20.22]31. Compared with Disney, what do most organizations do?

    [18:39.99]Passage Three

    [18:41.98]People joke that no one in Los Angeles reads; [18:45.63]everyone watches TV, rents videos, [18:48.25]or goes to the movies.

    [18:50.21]The most popular reading material is comic books, [18:53.85]movie magazines, and TV guides.

    [18:56.40]City libraries have only 10 percent of the traffic [18:59.94]that car washes have.

    [19:02.04]But how do you explain this?

    [19:04.82]An annual book festival in west Los Angeles [19:08.09]is “sold out” year after year.

    [19:10.47]People wait half an hour for a parking space [19:13.64]to become available.

    [19:15.10]This outdoor festival,

    [19:17.36]sponsored by a newspaper,

    [19:19.16]occurs every April for one weekend.

    [19:23.59]This year’s attendance

    [19:24.66]was estimated at 70,000 on Saturday

    [19:27.77]and 75,000 on Sunday.

    [19:30.60]The festival featured 280 exhibitors.

    [19:34.02]There were about 90 talks given by authors, [19:37.58]with an audience question-and-answer period [19:39.90]following each talk.

    [19:41.99]Autograph seekers sought out more than 150 authors. [19:46.49]A food court sold all kinds of popular and ethnic foods, [19:51.04]from American hamburgers to Hawaiian shave ice drinks. [19:55.55]Except for a $7 parking fee,

    [19:58.22]the festival was free.

    [20:00.51]Even so, some people avoided the food court prices [20:04.18]by sneaking in their own sandwiches and drinks. [20:07.65]People came from all over California.

    [20:11.44]One couple drove down from San Francisco. [20:14.29]This is their sixth year here now. They just love it. [20:18.75]The husband said that

    [20:20.43]it is just fantastic to be in the great outdoors, [20:24.24]to be among so many books and authors, [20:26.56]and to get some very good deals, too.

    [20:29.82]The idea for the festival occurred years ago, [20:33.71]but nobody knew if it would succeed.

    [20:36.69]Although book festivals were already popular [20:39.67]in other US cities,

    [20:41.44]would Los Angeles residents embrace one? [20:45.18]One of the festival founders said

    [20:47.54]that it all depends as angelinos are very unpredictable. [20:53.37]Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage [20:57.23]you have just heard.

    [20:59.41]32. What is the most popular reading material in Los Angeles? [21:21.05]33. When and how long is the book festival? [21:40.29]34. What can we know about this year’s festival?

    [21:59.97]35. What will the festival’s future be in Los Angeles

[22:04.99]according to the festival founder?

    [22:21.92]Section C

    [22:23.80]Directions:

    [22:25.28]In this section,

    [22:26.32]you will hear a passage three times, [22:29.17]when the passage is read for the first time, [22:31.60]you should listen carefully for its general idea. [22:35.60]When the passage is read for the second time, [22:38.38]you are required to fill in the blanks [22:40.67]numbered from 36 to 43

    [22:43.94]with the exact words you have just heard. [22:47.03]For blanks numbered from 44 to 46

    [22:50.49]you are required to fill in the missing information. [22:54.01]For these blanks,

    [22:55.14]you can either use the exact words

    [22:57.51]you have just heard

    [22:58.88]or write down the main points in your own words. [23:02.30]Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, [23:05.96]you should check what you have written. [23:08.51]Now listen to the passage.

    [23:11.28]Drugs have been a part of the American story [23:13.97]since the very first day

    [23:15.43]Columbus landed in the New World.

    [23:17.86]The Taino Indians presented Columbus [23:20.75]with a gift of tobacco,

    [23:22.51]which would go on to become

    [23:24.11]one of the most important drugs

    [23:25.91]in our history.

    [23:27.51]And if drugs have existed since the beginning, [23:30.25]so have drug problems.

    [23:32.40]And so have attempts to solve those drug problems. [23:35.77]Since the 19th century

    [23:37.26]when Americans first discovered new wonder drugs [23:40.22]like heroin and cocaine,

    [23:42.48]the whole society has confronted the problem [23:44.80]of drug abuse and addiction.

    [23:47.28]When the 20th century began, the United States

    [23:50.60]struggling with its first drug epidemic

    [23:53.41]gradually set up effective restrictions: [23:56.88]at home through domestic law enforcement and overseas [23:59.42]by starting a world movement

    [24:02.15]to limit opium and coca crops.

    [24:04.98]By World War II,

    [24:06.51]American drug use had become so rare

    [24:08.63]that it was not seen as a social problem. [24:11.55]The first epidemic was forgotten.

    [24:13.93]During the 1960s, drugs like marijuana, [24:17.51]and psychedelics came on the scene, [24:19.81]and a new generation embraced drugs. [24:21.79]With the drug culture exploding,

    [24:24.60]the government developed new laws and agencies [24:27.21]to address the problem.

    [24:29.18]In 1973, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration [24:32.98]was created to enforce federal drug laws. [24:36.28]In the 1970s, cocaine reappeared. [24:39.61]Then, a decade later, crack appeared, [24:42.36]spreading addiction and violence

    [24:43.98]at epidemic levels.

    [24:45.69]Today, the DEA’s biggest challenge

    [24:48.38]is the dramatic change in organized crime. [24:51.35]While local criminals once controlled drug trafficking [24:54.43]on U.S. soil,

    [24:55.71]today foreign criminal groups

    [24:57.53]control the drug trade in America. [25:03.47]Now the passage will be read again. [25:06.83]Drugs have been a part of the American story [25:10.34]since the very first day

    [25:11.77]Columbus landed in the New World. [25:14.62]The Taino Indians presented Columbus [25:17.15]with a gift of tobacco,

    [25:19.00]which would go on to become

    [25:20.48]one of the most important drugs

    [25:22.39]in our history.

    [25:23.96]And if drugs have existed since the beginning, [25:26.69]so have drug problems.

    [25:28.82]And so have attempts to solve those drug problems. [25:32.19]Since the 19th century

    [25:33.55]when Americans first discovered new wonder drugs [25:36.58]like heroin and cocaine,

    [25:38.72]the whole society has confronted the problem [25:41.15]of drug abuse and addiction.

    [25:43.31]When the 20th century began, the United States

    [25:46.87]struggling with its first drug epidemic

    [25:49.81]gradually set up effective restrictions: [25:52.88]at home through domestic law enforcement and overseas [25:56.55]by starting a world movement

    [25:58.24]to limit opium and coca crops.

    [26:01.04]By World War II,

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