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Chapter Eleven

By Ruby Wood,2014-06-17 17:26
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Chapter ElevenChap

    商学院 双语课程

    Logistics & Supply Chain

    Management

    授课教案

    jzj@sdjzu.edu.cn

    授课教师?姜阵剑

    Contents CHAPTER ONE THE INTRODUCTION OF LOGISTICS ..................... 2 CHAPER TWO PROCUREMENT ......................................................... 12 CHAPTER THREE MARKETING ........................................................ 21 CHAPTER FOUR LOGISTICS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT ..... 32 CHAPTER FIVE TRANSPORTATION.................................................. 44

    . 60 CHAPTER SIX WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT ................................

    CHAPTER SEVEN STOCK CONTROL ............................................... 69 CHAPTER EIGHT LOGISTIC DECISION-MAKING .......................... 76 CHAPTER NINE LOGISTICS/SUPPLY-CHAIN MANAGEMENT ..... 86 CHAPTER TEN MARKET ECONOMY SOLUTIONS ....................... 102 CHAPTER ELEVEN NETWORK ECONOMY SOLUTIONS OF SCM109 CHAPTER TWELVE SELECTING SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTION ... 121 CHAPTER THIRTEEN INTERNATIONAL TRADE ........................ 131 CHAPTER FOURTEEN LOGISTICS BEST PRACTICES .................. 138 CHAPTER FIFTEEN Best Practices Companies in SCM Action

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Chapter Eleven

    Network Economy Solutions Of SCM

    Basic Requirements:

    掌握供应链拉动模式及其纵向与横向范围!了解拉动模式的经济性分析和收益。

    Major Points:

    供应链拉动模式。

    Difficult Points:

    拉动模式的经济性分析。

    When we showed the supply chain relationships and technologies for the market economy in the previous chapter, we illustrated one extreme of the trade-off between production efficiency and customer responsiveness. Supply chain solutions for the market economy focus on production efficiency, based on demand forecasting. In contrast, the network economy solution has the customer at its center, pulling products and services as needed from the supply chain.

    For ease of exposition, we will refer to the network economy model as the pull model. In the pull model, the entire supply chain is engaged in satisfying the customer's product, service, and support needs on an ongoing basis. In traditional supply chains supporting the push model, usually only the down-stream partners and the channel master interact directly with the customer in contrast, for the pull model, most trading partners of the supply chain will be required to interact directly with the customer Unlike the hierarchical relationships illustrated in the previous chapter, in the pull model there is a no linear flow of goods, services, and information to and from the customer Rather, the trading partners collaborate among themselves and communicate with the customer to provide customized products and services at the customer's point of need (refer to Figure 12.1). To highlight this difference, we will refer to the supply chain supporting the pull model as a supply web. The supply web is organized for communication and collaboration across all its trading partners with the goal of full responsiveness to customer needs. 11.1 Pull Model

    Figure 11.1 shows the customer centered pull model and the supporting supply web. The customer can configure and order products and services through a variety of options for example,

physical outlets, and phone, fax, email, or Web forms.