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Positive Behavior Support Made Simple - Ventura County SELPA

By Johnny Ramos,2014-11-12 10:17
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Positive Behavior Support Made Simple - Ventura County SELPA

    Ventura County SELPA

     Mary E. Samples, Assistant Superintendent

    “It’s easy as 1-2-3-4-5-6”

    Positive Behavior

    Support Made Simple

    -2010-

    Contact:

    Fran Arner-Costello, Director, Programs &

    Services 5100 Adolfo Rd, Camarillo

    CA 93012

    805-437-1560

    7-2353

    email: farnerco@vcoe.org

    Revised 3/1/05

    Table of Contents

    A. Slides ………………………………………………………………….page 1

    B. Introduction ........................................................... page 6

    C. The Method: “It’s Easy as 1-2-3-4-5-6” .................... page 7

    1. Defining Problem Behavior............................. page 8

    2. Communicative Function ............................. page 10

    3. Environmental Modifications ........................ page 15

    4. Replacement Behavior ................................. page 32

    5. Interventions .............................................. page 34

    6. Data Collection ........................................... page 46

    D. The Most Common Misbehaviors ............................ page 65

    1. Non-Compliance to Teacher Requests .......... page 66

    2. Striking Others ............................................ page 68

    3. Talking Out/Back ........................................ page 70

    4. Minor Fine Motor Annoyances. ..................... page 72

    5. Spitting ...................................................... page 73

    6. Masturbation .............................................. page 75

    7. Resists Transitioning Between Tasks ............ page 77

    8. Resists Transitioning Between

    Environments ............................................. page 78

    9. Throwing Objects ........................................ page 80

    10. Difficulty Focusing on/Completing Tasks ....... page 82

    11. Biting ......................................................... page 84

    12. Out of Seat ................................................. page 86

    13. Inappropriate Social Interactions.................. page 88

    Table of Contents (cont.)

    14. Running Away/Elopement ............................ page 90

    15. Drops to Ground ......................................... page 92

    16. Lying .......................................................... page 94

    17. Verbal Aggression ....................................... page 95 E. Sample Positive Behavior Support Plans: ................ page 97 F. Writing Team ....................................................... page 110

Introduction…..

     In the past decades, educators tended to think of “behavior management” and “education” as two separate tasks. We believed our job was to educate students in academics, and before we could do that, we needed to get behaviors “under control”.

     Punitive measures were often used, such as the delivery of negative consequences after a problem behavior occurred. Many educators thought that if a student’s behavior was not responding to punishment, they needed to be served in another environment where behaviors would be addressed, and the student would be returned to the academic setting when he was “ready to learn”.

     We are now very aware that teaching students to use socially appropriate behaviors is an extremely important educational task! We know that the best

    predictor of successful life outcomes is good social skills. We realize that this

    instruction needs to take place in the same places where all other learning

    . occurs

     Students, especially those with disabilities, may have developed problem behaviors over a long period of time. We know that giving them new, more appropriate behaviors may also take a long time. It will require instruction,

    modeling, shaping, repetition and patience to put in place positive behaviors that will last.

     We also know that most problem behaviors fill some need for the student, however irrational and illogical it may appear to us. It is imperative that we figure out that need in order to make changes in the school environment and teach other ways to get that need met. If we only intervene after a problem

    behavior occurs, we will miss the opportunity for teaching them a new way to behave.

    The process is simple enough,”1-2-3-4-5-6”, but the implementation may

    not feel so easy. However, with good planning, and staff and families working together, we will give students skills to last a lifetime!

     6

    Positive Behavior Support

    The Method

    “It’s Easy as 1-2-3-4-5-6”

     Defining Problem Behavior

     (The behavior you want to change)

     ;

    Communicative Function

    (What the student “gets” or “says” with the behavior)

     ;

     Environmental Modifications

     (Things to consider changing in the school environment)

     ;

    Replacement Behaviors

    (What you want the student to do instead-This is the part that’s like regular teaching!)

     ;

    Interventions

    (Getting the problem behavior to reduce or go away

    while putting a new replacement behavior in its place)

     ;

    Data

    (How do you know interventions are working? Are you

    sure the replacement behavior is increasing?)

     7

STEP ONE

Defining Problem Behavior

    Why….. It is important to define the problem behavior so that we can all agree exactly on which behavior we want to change. By clearly defining the problem behavior, we can get clues as to why it occurs. It also will give us a baseline for measuring change.

What….. Problem behaviors should be stated clearly in specific, measurable and

    observable terms. Examples….”Bangs back of head on floor 3-4 times repeatedly,

    often leaving bumps or bruises”……”Swears at teacher and peers in a loud voice, heard by all in room”…..”Refuses to do school work when requested, even after

    a 5 minute delay period is allowed.” Avoid vague or judgmental terms such as “tantrums”, “defiance”, and “non-compliance” unless you will define further.

    How….. Problem behaviors are defined by observing the student and recording how the behavior occurs. Staff and family should agree on which problem behavior will be worked on (if more than one) and it should be defined clearly enough so that if two different people were collecting data, they would agree each time that the behavior had occurred.

Attachments:

     Target Behaviors Questionnaire