DOC

Quality Assurance Directorate (Mechanical) - rdso

By Derrick Andrews,2014-11-11 07:18
10 views 0
Quality Assurance Directorate (Mechanical) - rdso

    Notes on Perceptual and Motor Measures in the

    Templin Longitudinal Archive

    Prepared by Ann Bosma Smit

    Updated Februrary 21, 2005

    The Templin Longitudinal Study included a large number of measures devoted to auditory perception, visual perception, and motor measures (rhythm, handwriting, and the oral mechanism). Most of the perceptual measures were administered in Kindergarten or first grade.

    Measures Based on an Auditory Stimulus

Spencer Synthesis of Words, Rhyming Words, and

     Identification of Initial Sounds (SRISpencer, 1958)

    Administered at Sessions 3 (Spring 1961, Kindergarten) and 5 (Spring 1962, Grade 1) Raw data are in data box #7 for Session 3 and boxes #11 and #13 for Session 5

    Note: These tests are related to the Spencer Nonsense Word Test (also called the Spencer Nonsense Repetition Test, or the Spencer Nonsense Word Articulation Test) , which is described under Articulation Measures, but with additional items.

    In the Spencer Synthesis task, the child was asked to synthesize words from two or three syllables, e.g. from ba by or um - brel - la. First 8 words broken into syllables were

    presented, then 8 words broken into phonemes. The maximum score for each part was 8, for a synthesis total of 16.

In the Spencer Rhyming Words test, the child’s task was to determine which word from

    among several choices rhymed with a test word. There were five items in which the rhyming word was identified from among 8 pictures, i.e. cup, cat, bus, bed, horn, tent,

    coat, and bread, to rhyme with sat, boat, corn, us, and sent. One demonstration item was

    provided. Then the child was asked to think up rhyming words for another five items without picture support. The words were hear, tree, fair, nose, and fun. There was one

    demonstration item. The maximum total score with picture support was 5, without picture support was 5, for a rhyming words total, with a maximum value of 10.

    In the Spencer Identification of Initial Sounds task, the child was asked to identify pictures whose name began with selected single sounds presented aurally. The child first named 15 pictures, then was asked to locate a picture that began with the single sound uttered by the examiner. The 15 pictures were as follows, with the ten test items asterisked:

     meat *sock *table iron *feather

     baby *wagon bike mittens *chicken

     *hammer *lamp *candy *apple *doll

     1

    In Session 3 the test was discontinued if the child failed to pass the first three items after several preliminary demonstrations. In Session 5 the whole test was always given. The maximum possible score was 10.

    For each task, Session 3 subscores (if any) and then a total score are entered into columns 40-51 on Card 1, Session 3, and for Session 5, into the same columns on Card 1, Session 5.

     2

Monroe Sound Discrimination (also called Monroe Auditory I)

    Administered in Session 4 (Fall 1961, Grade 1)

    Raw data are in data box #16

This is the Auditory I Test in the Monroe Reading Aptitude Tests (Monroe, 1935). It

    consists of nine line drawings of a boat, cup, hen, hand, basket, rat, flower, hammer, and

    streetcar. For each, the child is asked to identify the correct pronunciation of the pictured object from among three “words” differing in only one phoneme that are said allowed by the examiner. The child’s response was to point to the number corresponding to the correct version. The maximum score was 9, including two practice items.

The score is entered into column 21 on Card 1, Session 4.

     3

Monroe Synthesis of Words Test (also called Monroe Auditory II)

    Administered in Session 4 (Fall 1961, Grade 1)

    Raw data are in data box #16

This is Auditory II Test in the Monroe Reading Aptitude Tests (Monroe, 1935). The

    child is to identify each of the following 12 pictures by synthesizing the separate sounds

    of the word uttered by the examiner: shoe, cat, mother, house, track, pan, lap, peas,

    engine, puddle, gate, and bud. There are three picture foils for each word. For example, for house, the three foils are horse, house, and mouse. The maximum score is 12.

    The score is entered into columns 22-23 on Card 1, Session 4.

     4

Templin Sound Discrimination Test (Templin, 1957)

    Administered in Session 3 (Spring 1961, Kindergarten) and Session 5 (Spring, 1962, Grade 1)

    Raw data are in data box #7 for Session 3 and in #13 for Session 5.

    In Session 5, this test was administered by speech clinicians with the Minneapolis Public Schools. The test consists of 50 pairs of syllables that have been found most discriminating and that were used in earlier work by Templin. Each pair, either an identical pair (e.g. le___le) or a minimal pair (e.g. et___eʧ), was spoken by the examiner.

    The child was expected to respond with “Same” or “Different.” The score is the number

    of correct responses, with a maximum of 50.

The child’s Session 3 score is entered into columns 52-53 on Card 1, Session 3. For

    session 5, the score is entered into columns 52-53 on Card 1, Session 5.

     5

Harrison-Stroud Matching Sounds I (also called Harrison-Stroud 4)

    Administered in Session 4 (Fall 1961, Grade 1)

    Raw data are in data box #16

This is Test 4 from the Harrison-Stroud Reading Readiness Profiles (Harrison and Stroud,

    1956). The child sees three line drawings in each item box, one on the left and two on the right. The child’s job is to listen to the examiner as she says the first item and then the other two. Then the child draws a line from the item on the left to the item on the other side that begins with the same sound as the first item. One point is given for each correct response, with a maximum score of 16.

The score is entered into columns 24-25 on Card 1, Session 4.

     6

Harrison-Stroud Matching Sounds II (also called Harrison-Stroud 5)

    Administered in Session 4 (Fall 1961, Grade 1)

    Raw data are in data box #16

This is Test 5 from the Harrison-Stroud Reading Readiness Profiles (Harrison and Stroud,

    1956). The child’s task is to identify an initial sound from within a category for 18 items. For example, pictures of ring, rabbit, and calf are presented and the child is told the following story and then asked to identify the pet that ran away: “Roy had two pets on his grandfather’s farm. One pet ran away. The pet that ran away begins like Roy’s name.” The maximum score is 18.

The score is entered into columns 26-27 on Card 1, Session 4.

     7

Auditory Memory Test

    Constructed by N. Cowan and M.C. Templin

    Administered in Session 7 (Spring 1963, Grade 2)

    Raw data are in data boxes #4 and 5

This test has four parts, as follows:

    Part I. Digit Repetition (Recall). It contains seven items in which two to nine digits are to be repeated back after the examiner says them. There are two samples for each length, and only one needs to be correct for the child to be credited with that digit span. The child’s score is the highest number of digits that he or she repeats correctly,

    for a maximum of 9.

    Part 2. Word Repetition (Recall). This part consists of six items in which three to six unrelated single-syllable words are to be repeated in the appropriate order. There is only one set of words for each length. The child’s score is the highest number of words that she or he repeats correctly, for a maximum score of 6.

    Part 3. Story Comprehension. A one-paragraph passage called The School

    Concert from the Revised Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (Terman & Merrill, 1937) is

    read to the child. The examiner then asks the child 6 questions about the passage. The maximum score is 6.

    Part 4. Sentence Repetition (Recall). In this task the examiner produces nine sentences that range in length from 5 to 21 words. The child is to repeat the sentence. The score is the number of words in the longest sentence that is repeated correctly, for a maximum score of 21. The scores from the four parts are added together for a total score with a maximum value of 42.

    The score for each subtest as well as the total score are entered into columns 27, 28, 29, 30-31, and 32-33, respectively, on Card 1, Session 7.

     8

The Spencer Nonsense Recall Test (Spencer, 1958)

    Administered in Session 3 (Spring 1961, Kindergarten) and in Session 5 (Spring, 1962, grade 1)

    Raw data are located in data boxes #6 and 17, respectively

    Note: This measure is different from the Spencer Nonsense Articulation or the Spencer Nonsense Repetition Test, which is described under Measures of Articulation.

    In Session 3, this test was administered by the project examiners. In Session 5, the test was administered by speech clinicians with the Minneapolis Public Schools. In this test, the child was asked to repeat nonsense syllable strings varying from 2 to 5 syllables in length, with 3 tokens for each length. The examiner presented the syllables at the rate of “slow distinct speech.” Two scores were obtained. The first score was the number of items in which both the number of syllables and the articulation of the sounds in the entire phrase were correct. The second score was the number of items to which the child responded with the correct number of syllables, regardless of articulation. For each score, the maximum value was 12. However, only the first score is entered into the database.

    The Session 3 scores are entered into columns 29-30 on Card 1. The Session 5 scores are entered into columns 29-30 on Card 1.

     9

    Measures Based on a Visual Stimulus

Metropolitan Readiness Test

    Administered at Session 4 (Fall 1961, Grade 1)

    Raw data are in data boxes #15 and 16

The Metropolitan Readiness Test, Form R (Hildreth and Griffiths, 1949) was designed

    for use at the end of kindergarten or at the beginning of the first grade. Six separate subtests make up the test. They are:

    ; Word Meaning. The child selects the picture named by the examiner from

    among four foils. The maximum score is 19.

    ; Sentences. The child selects the picture about which the examiner has read a

    sentence. There are four foils. The maximum score is 14.

    ; Information. The child selects from among 4 pictures the one that best

    corresponds to the examiner’s description. The descriptions generally concern

    the item’s function. The maximum score is 14.

    ; Matching. This subtest involves the recognition of visual similarities. Each

    item contains four pictures, and in the center is a fifth picture with a frame

    around it. The fifth picture matches one of the other four pictures. The

    child’s task is to identify the matching pictures. The categories of pictures

    include simple and complex shapes, objects, numbers, and letters. The

    maximum score is 19.

    ; Numbers. This subtest presents the child with material related to numbers and

    quantity. The examiner provides a verbal instruction. For example, one

    picture shows a farmer with a line of seven chickens in front of him. The

    examiner says, “Look at the farmer and his chickens. Mark the seventh

    chicken from the farmer.” The maximum score is 24.

    ; Copying. The child copies capital letters, shapes, figures, and numbers. The

    maximum score is 10.

    The total score for the test is the sum of the scores of the subtests, and the maximum total score is 100.

    The subtest scores are entered into columns 28-29, 30-31, 32-33, 34-35, 36-37, and 38-39 on card 1, Session 4. The total score is entered into columns 40-41 on the same card. Presumably, no child had a total score of 100.

     10

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com