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Anna Karenina

By Erica Freeman,2014-12-06 19:43
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Anna Karenina

Book Anna Karenina

    Name 陈瑶

    Class 10

    Student number 1201011003

    Anna’s tragedy or the society’s tragedy

    At the beginning of the book, Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy said, happy families are all alike, every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. It is true, this book shows us a extreme contrast between happiness and unhappiness. Anna, a woman who concentrated on the pursuit of happiness moved thousands of people, but her ending is so pitiful. Her tragedy has been talked for a long time.

    Before Anna met Vronsky, she was a beautiful aristocratic pride young lady, her charming face attracted everyone. But she was unhappy with her machine-like husband who didn’t understand what is true love and just think it was god’s will that

    combined them together. At the first sight of Vronsky on a train, Anna was attracted by the handsome captain. And so did Vronsky. Vronsky was very warm and kind to Anna. He attended every party that could see Anna. All his actions made Anna felt uncomfortable at first, but trapped in a loveless marriage, Anna succumbs to temptation and embarks on a dangerous affair with the handsome Vronsky. On a horse race, Vronsky fell the horse heavily. Anna can’t help scream loudly. Karenin felt embarrass and forced Anna to go back home. Anna can’t ignore her husband’s hypocrisy and selfish, she shouted at him “I love him, I hate you…” The relationship between the couple was broken from then. Anna and Vronsky decided to go away.

    Having travelled for three months, Anna missed her child very much and went back to Petersburg. Dare not to go home, she lived in the hotel. After got a chill welcome, her old friends and relatives refused to contact her which made her feel painful and ashamed. Under the pressure of society and the public opinions, they daren’t to live together. Besides, they avoided to meet along.

    Thinking for his reputation, Vronsky became cold to Anna. He often went to the club along, leaving Anna at home. The situation kept for 3 months, Anna can’t ignore

    and asked him to de some explanation. “If you don’t love, please speak out honestly.” Anna shouted. Vronsky felt very annoyed. After the fight, Vronsky went away in anger. Anna felt everything come to an end. She thought she was a person abandoned, and affronted. She ran to the train station, waiting for his letter. Determined not to be tortured, she ended up her life lying in the rail wearing a black shirt. The rushing train ended her helpless love and life leaving the infinite sadness.

    There is no doubt that Anna’s life is miserable, in my point of view, there are two

    reasons which cause Anna’s tragedy.

    First, Anna’s contradictory inner world and her excessive dependence. On the

    one hand, she is very brave to pursuit her true love, on the other hand, she depends on Vronsky too much, she thinks that Vronsky is everything, she relies on him totally. She has said that she lived off his love. Once his love disappear, she absolutely will die. Anna gives up everything in order to love one person, but what she gets finally are disappointing and hate. This is the tragedy of Anna and all of the women. Women always depend on men, and this kind of relationship absolutely can’t go on forever. Second, the morbid society. Anna is abandoned because she makes her affair known to the public but not because of her affair. At that time, affair is not uncommon, people doing these stuff behind, but Anna is so brave that she can disclose her true love. Compared with other hypocritical people, she’s a true lover. She challenged the hypocritical sick society and this is why she was intolerant by all of the people. All she wants is that she can love Vronsky and her son, how simple her wish is! But this corrupt and dark Tsarist Russia can’t satisfy her simple wish. This is the tragedy of the whole society, and this is the root cause of Anna’s tragedy.

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