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American Society of Criminology Introduction to Criminology

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American Society of Criminology Introduction to Criminologyof,to

American Society of Criminology

    Introduction to Criminology Syllabi Collection

    Co-editors: Denise Paquette Boots (University of Texas

    at Dallas) &William Reese (Augusta State University)

     Sample Syllabi from Various Contributors

    Table of Contents

    Alan Bruce (Crime & Society)…………………………………………………..page 3 Steven Barkan (Crime & Criminal Justice)……………………………………...page 9 Denise Paquette Boots (Introduction to Crime & Criminology)………………...page 13 Christine Gardiner (Introduction to Criminology, Law & Society)……………..page 21 Christine Gardiner (Crime & Delinquency)…......................................................page 27 Heath Hoffman (Criminology)…………………………………………………..page 38 Jon Shane (Criminology)………………………………………………………...page 43 Josh Klein (Criminology)………………………………………………………..page 49 Marian Mosser (Criminology)……………………………………………… …..page 57 Mark Warr (Criminology)…....................................................................... .........page 69 Travis Pratt (Nature of Crime)……………………………………… … …….page 72 Susan Smith-Cunnien (Criminology)……………………………… … … …..page 79 Tim Berard………………………………………………………………………page 87ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 2

    Course Instructor

    Dr. Alan S. Bruce

    CJ/SO 283 A - Crime and Society

    Office: 336 CLA-1

    Fall Semester, 2006

    Office hours: See Blackboard

    MWF 9-9:50 am

    Phone: Extension 8458

    Room TH 318

    Email: alan.bruce@quinnipiac.edu

    Introduction

    This course provides an introduction to the study of crime, commonly known as criminology. Criminology is primarily concerned with understanding the causes of crime, and so we will examine some of the most influential explanations for criminal behavior. As social context shapes general beliefs, however, it also shapes beliefs about crime; we will consider how different explanations have emerged at different times and understand how social context contributes to explanations of crime. To develop credible explanations for crime we must understand the nature of crime, and we will examine a range of criminal activity.

    General Approach to Teaching Crime and Society

    My approach to the study of crime and society is guided by the Quality Standards for the Baccalaureate

    Degree in Criminal Justice developed by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS). ACJS standards for criminal justice education state in part;

    The purpose of undergraduate programs in criminal justice is to educate students to be critical

    communicate their thoughts effectively in oral and written form. Programs thinkers who can communicate their thoughts effectively in oral and written form

    should familiarize students with facts and concepts and teach students to apply this knowledge

    to related problems and changing situations. (From Quality Standards for the Baccalaureate

    Degree in Criminal Justice published by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences,

    http://www.acjs.org/pubs/167_667_12021.cfm)

    ACJS standards are reflected in the course objectives and assessment criteria.

    Course Objectives and Assessment

    Upon successful completion of this course students will:

     Understand the major criminological explanations of crime.

     Be able to utilize criminological theory to explain crime.

     Understand the nature of a variety of criminal activities.

     Be able to effectively communicate about criminological theory.

    ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 3

     Understand how social context impacts thought concerning crime and its causes. Be able to critically assess explanations of crime.

    Progress towards meeting these objectives will be determined by performance on exams and quizzes, and quality of course participation and writing assignments.

    Required Reading

    The following texts are available in the university bookstore:

    thAdler, F., Mueller, G. O., & Laufer, W. S. (2007). Criminology (6 ed.). New York: McGraw Hill.

    thReiman, J. (2007). The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison: Ideology, Class, and Criminal Justice (8

    ed.). Needham Heights: Allyn & Bacon.

    Additional required reading will be distributed in class or placed in Blackboard; you are responsible for these regardless of your attendance.

    Course Expectations

    You can expect me to be respectful at all times, be in class on time, hold regular office hours as posted in blackboard, quickly respond to your questions, assist you with class assignments, return all written work within two weeks, provide clear guidelines on expectations for all assignments, and provide you with meaningful feedback on your work.

    In class we will use a lecture - discussion format and failure to adequately prepare for class will prevent effective participation. I expect you to come to class having read the assigned material, completed

    assignments, and prepared to discuss the relevant material. You are expected to hand in assignments

    on time and take exams at the scheduled times.

    There will be no opportunity for extra-credit assignments so it is important that you satisfy stated requirements. PLEASE DO NOT APPROACH ME REQUESTING EXTRA-CREDIT ASSIGNMENTS.

    You are expected to alert me if you are having any trouble with the course material. I am unable to

    provide help if you do not seek it! When reading the material you should ask yourself:

    - Do I understand the vocabulary?

    - Do I understand the concepts the words are meant to convey?

    - Can I explain the material in my own words?

    If you cannot answer “yes” to each of these let me know as soon as possible.

    This course will rely heavily on the Blackboard system available through the Quinnipiac University website. You must familiarize yourself with Blackboard as soon as possible.

    To give your inquiries the attention they deserve and allow me to begin class on time you are expected

    to bring your questions to me during my office hours rather than immediately before or after class.

ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 4

    ACADEMIC HONESTY

    You must follow the university’s Academic Integrity policy. The current Academic Integrity Policy can be

    accessed at http://www.quinnipiac.edu/x847.xml. Violation of the Academic Integrity Policy will result

    in report to the university academic integrity board, an F grade for the course, and possibly a judicial hearing. Familiarize yourself with the Academic Integrity Policy and contact me if you have any questions about it.

    Attendance

    Full attendance is expected. You are responsible for all material and assignments whether you attend class or not, and it is in your best interest to attend all class meetings. There will be information presented in class that is not in the required readings and you are responsible for this whether or not you are in class. There may also be changes in the schedule or assignments that are announced in class, and again you are responsible for these regardless of attendance. Irregular attendance will result in poor performance on all assignments and a low grade for the course. Finally, a record of attendance will be kept and considered in determining class participation grades.

    It is my strong preference that you do not bring laptop computers to class. Should you choose to bring a laptop to class it must only be used for course activities; email, instant messaging, online poker/gambling, checking sports scores, or showing-your-buddy-something-really-

    cool/funny/weird/gross are not course activities. Using a laptop for non-course activities will seriously reduce your course participation grade.

    When in class please do not sleep, write notes to each other, read newspapers, do homework for any class, listen to music, or engage in activity that may disturb others. Turn off your phone!!

    Students With Disabilities: If you are a student with a documented disability I am happy to make the necessary accommodations BUT it is your responsibility to submit the relevant paperwork to me. I cannot make accommodations based on disability until I have received the relevant paperwork. Know your neighbor! It is a good idea to get the contact information for those sitting around you this

    can help you get notes/announcements should you miss class, and get assistance with preparation for exams and quizzes. Say hello and write down their contact information!

    Exams, Quizzes, Class Participation, and Assignments

    Your final grade for the course will be determined by performance on exams, quizzes and/or in-class assignments, written assignments, and class participation.

     There will be two exams in this course, one during week 8, and a final exam given during finals week.

    The final exam covers material from the entire semester. Exams comprise 50% of your final course

    grade.

     There will be 4 quizzes given in class that comprise 15% of your overall grade. Only three quizzes

    count towards your final grade therefore you drop your lowest quiz grade. No make-up quizzes will

    be given.

    ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 5

     Writing assignments will be distributed at appropriate points in the semester. Writing assignments

    comprise 25% of your overall course grade. Late assignments will be penalized 5% of the earned

    score for each day past the deadline.

     While course participation is graded subjectively the following are taken into consideration;

    attendance, preparation for class, contribution to class and blackboard discussion, and

    demonstrated level of enthusiasm for course material. Note that contribution to class discussion

    does not simply involve talking but should demonstrate that you have read and understood the

    assigned material. Course participation comprises 10% of your overall course grade.

     Should you have questions about earned grades you must make an appointment to come and meet

    with me; please do not attempt to discuss assignment grades with me immediately before or after

    class. A 48 hour “reflection” period must occur before I will discuss earned grades.

    Each assignment is worth a certain number of points and comprises a proportion of your final course grade. The maximum number of points available for this course is 300. The number of points and proportion of the final course grade for assignments is as follows:

    Exam 1 65 points = 22% of your final course grade.

    Exam 2 85 points = 28% of your final course grade.

    Quizzes 45 points total = 15% of your final course grade.

    Written assignments. 75 points = 25% of your final course grade.

    Participation 30 points = 10% of your final course grade.

    Total 300 points = 100%

    Final grades will be determined by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of possible points, with the resulting percentage converted into a letter grade using the following scale:

    A = 93-100% B+ = 87-89% C+ = 77-79% D = 60-69%

    A- = 90-92% B = 83-86% C = 73-76% F = 0-59%

     B- = 80-82% C- = 70-72%

    You can calculate your current course grade at any time. Divide the number of points you have earned by the total number of points available to that point, multiply the total by 100 to calculate your percentage, and use the above scale to determine your grade.

ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 6

    Tentative Schedule

    August 28: Course overview and introductions. Week 1

    August 30: So what is “criminology”? Adler et al. chapter 1.

    September 1: So what is “criminology”? Adler et al. chapter 1, Reiman Introduction. September 4: University holiday-no class. Week 2

    September 6: How do we know about crime? Adler et al. chapter 2.

    September 8: How do we know about crime? Adler et al. chapter 2.

    September 11: How do we know about crime? Adler et al. chapter 2, Reiman chapter 1. Week 3

    September 13: QUIZ 1.

    Why’d they do it? Witches, criminaloids and the feebleminded. Adler et al. chapter 3. September 15: Why’d they do it? Witches, criminaloids and the feebleminded. Adler et al. chapter 3.

    September 18: Why’d they do it? Modern biological and psychological explanations. Adler Week 4

    et al. chapter 4.

    September 20: Why’d they do it? Modern biological and psychological explanations. Adler et al. chapter 4.

    September 22: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - strain. Adler et al. chapter 5.

    September 25: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - strain. Adler et al. chapter Week 5

    5.

    September 27: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - strain. Adler et al. chapter 5.

    September 29: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - strain. Adler et al. chapter 5.

    October 2: Yom Kippur - university holiday. Week 6

    October 4: QUIZ 2.

    Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - subcultures. Adler et al. chapter 6. October 6: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - subcultures. Adler et al. chapter 6.

    October 9: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - control. Adler et al. chapter 7. Week 7

    October 11: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - control. Adler et al. chapter 7. October 13: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - control. Adler et al. chapter 7. October 16: MID-TERM EXAM. Week 8

    October 18: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime. Adler et al. chapter 8, Reiman

    chapter 2.

    October 20: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime. Adler et al. chapter 8, Reiman

    chapter 2.

    October 23: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime. Adler et al. chapter 8, Reiman Week 9

    chapter 2.

    October 25: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - environment. Adler et al. chapter 9.

    October 27: Why’d they do it? Social explanations of crime - environment. Adler et al. chapter 9.

    October 30: QUIZ 3. Week 10

    What do they do and how do they do it? Violence and hate. Adler et al. chapter 10. November 1: What do they do and how do they do it? Violence and hate. Adler et al. chapter 10.

    November 3: What do they do and how do they do it? Violence and hate. Adler et al. chapter 10.

    ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 7

November 6: What do they do and how do they do it? Violence and hate. Adler et al. Week 11

    chapter 10.

    What do they do and how do they do it? Property crime. Adler et al. chapter 11. November 8: What do they do and how do they do it? White-collar and organized crime. Adler et al. chapter 12.

    November 10: What do they do and how do they do it? White-collar and organized crime. Adler et al. chapter 12, Reiman chapter 3.

    November 13: What do they do and how do they do it? White-collar and organized crime. Week 12

    Adler et al. chapter 12, Reiman chapter 4.

    November 15: QUIZ 4.

    What do they do and how do they do it? White-collar and organized crime. Adler et al. chapter 12, Reiman chapter 4.

    November 17: What do they do and how do they do it? White-collar and organized crime. Adler et al. chapter 12.

    November 20: University holiday, no class. Week 13

    November 22: Thanksgiving break, no class.

    November 24: Thanksgiving break, no class.

    November 27: But why is it wrong? Because we say it is! Adler et al. chapter 13. Week 14

    November 29: But why is it wrong? Because we say it is! Adler et al. chapter 13. December 1: But why is it wrong? Because we say it is! Adler et al. chapter 13. December 4: What can we do about crime? Reiman conclusion. Week 15

    December 6: Is ours’ the only way? Comparative Criminology. Adler et al. chapter 14. December 8: Last day of class.

    Beginning December 11: Final exam given ONLY at time scheduled by the university. Week 16

    Note: This syllabus is subject to change at any time and without notice.

    ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 8

SOC 214 - Crime and Criminal Justice Office: 201 Fernald Hall

    Fall 2007 Phone: 581-2383

    Steven Barkan E-mail: barkan@maine.edu & FC

    Office Hours: TTh 1:55-2:55 p.m.

     and by appt.

    SYLLABUS

    Welcome to criminology! This course concerns the sociological study of crime and criminal justice in the United States. A major goal will be to answer three questions: (1) What are the causes of crime? (2) How can crime be reduced? and (3) To what degree does criminal justice decision-making reflect racial/ethnic, social class, and gender biases? As we will see, these questions are not easy to answer. The course will provide you with a variety of perspectives and information that will help you realize the complexity of the crime problem.

    When I was a college student, I decided to major in sociology because I felt it had something to say about the world around me and my place in it, and because my sociology instructors respected me and treated me like a human being, not just like a cog in a machine. After many years of teaching, Im just as fascinated by sociology as I was in college, and I hope that by the end of this course you will also appreciate what sociology has to offer for the understanding of crime and related problems. Classes will include informal lectures and discussions. Lectures will integrate course readings and incorporate other literature to present additional information. Discussions will help you learn to think sociologically and to deal critically with course materials. For us all to learn as much as possible from the course, regular class attendance and timely completion of reading assignments are essential. Everyone is expected to attend class regularly and to do all reading assignments by their due date. Ultimately what you get out of this course depends on what you put into it. The requirements for the course are designed to help you learn as much as possible and, especially, to help you learn to think sociologically about crime and criminal justice. I will take attendance to support the following policy. An absence is excused if it occurs because of documented illness, a university-approved trip, or other urgent reason with my approval. Students with no more than two unexcused absences will receive consideration in event of a borderline grade and will also be eligible for some extra credit (see below). Anyone who accumulates more than six unexcused absences will get no higher than a C-, and anyone who accumulates more than eight unexcused absences will get no higher than a D-.

    For our class to succeed, we all must practice classroom etiquette. First and foremost, this means that we all must respect each others opinions and follow standards of common courtesy. Students

    ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 9

    should refrain from behaviors that violate these standards. These behaviors include, but are not limited to: excessive chattering; coming in late or leaving early; using cell phones, pagers, or other electronic devices; passing notes; reading newspapers, magazines, or other inappropriate material in class; sleeping in class; using a laptop computer for reasons other than taking class notes. Repeat offenders may be asked to leave the class and/or may suffer a reduction in their course grade, including possible failure in the course, and other sanctions allowed by the University. Such sanctions may occur whether or not you are asked to correct your behavior.

     The grade for the course will be determined as follows. Three multiple-choice exams will given on the dates listed below; each will count 23% toward the final course grade, or 69% overall. Four short reaction papers will each count 3% toward the final course grade, or 12% overall. Finally, a term paper will count for 19% of the final course grade. These modes of evaluation are discussed further below. In determining the final course grade, an average of 94-100=A, 90-93=A-, 87-89=B+, 84-86=B, 80-83=B-, and so forth. Students are reminded that plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty violate the University of Maine Student Conduct code as outlined in the Student Handbook.

    I know this syllabus sounds very formal, but I hope you will enjoy the course and will do my best to make sure you do. I bring into this course many years of teaching about, and doing research on, crime and criminal justice, which I consider important, fascinating topics of great relevance for the field of sociology and well as for society. I'll be very interested in your views on the course as we proceed, and welcome your thoughts throughout the semester.

    Finally, I encourage students with disabilities to speak with me about accommodations they might need to help assure success in this class. If you feel you might have an undiagnosed disability, please feel free to talk with me and/or to contact Ann Smith at the Onward Program on campus (581-2319).

    REQUIRED READINGS

    rdSteven E. Barkan, Criminology: A Sociological Understanding, 3 ed.

    Careers in Criminal Justice cd-rom supplement

    TOPICS AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

    I. UNDERSTANDING CRIME AND CRIMINOLOGY

    Sept. 4,6,11,13 Criminology and Sociology. Chapter 1

    Sept. 18,20 Public Opinion and the Media. Chapter 2

    Sept. 25,27 Measuring Crime and Victimization. Chapters 3,4

    II. EXPLAINING CRIME AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR

    ASC Introduction to Criminology Sample Syllabi Page 10

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