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OSAB Annual Report 2012-2013

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OSAB Annual Report 2012-2013OSAB A

    Ofcom Spectrum Advisory

    Board

    Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Publication date: 16 July 2013

OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Contents

    Section Page

    1 Message from Ofcom‟s Chairman 2

    2 Foreword by OSAB‟s Chairman 3

    3 Introduction 4

    4 Topics considered during the year 6

    Annex Page

    1 Ofcom Spectrum Advisory Board Terms of Reference 21

    2 Membership of OSAB 23

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OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Section 1

    Message from Ofcom‟s Chairman

    OSAB, since its inception in 2004, has played an invaluable role by being able to looking ahead and widely, ensuring that Ofcom remains well informed about key trends throughout the sectors we regulate.

    The past year has seen progress on, or successful completion of, a number of Ofcom‟s spectrum related activities. These include the award of 4G spectrum and the further development of our plans to make TV white spaces available for innovative new services. Yet the communications market continues to evolve and we are already looking ahead to the next set of challenges.

    The topics which OSAB has considered over the period covered by this report have included the delivery of services over both wireless and wired networks. Subjects tackled include the evolution of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies, backhaul options for mobile networks and the provision of reliable in-building coverage.

    With its wide range of authoritative members from a diverse range of backgrounds, OSAB invariably casts new light on the significant challenges that face us in the years ahead, as well as alerting us to new issues and opportunities that will emerge. OSAB meetings are always well attended; and the lively discussions are characteristic of the personal enthusiasm of the members.

    As always, I‟d like to record my gratitude to all members of OSAB who provide their time and experience. Yet again, in reading their annual report, I‟m struck both by the breadth of issues they have covered and the diversity of advice they have provided advice that, as ever,

    continues to be taken very seriously within Ofcom

Colette Bowe

    Chairman of Ofcom

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OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Section 2

    Foreword by OSAB‟s Chairman

    The Ofcom Spectrum Advisory Board (OSAB) is pleased to present its ninth annual report and my third as its Chairman.

    In this last year OSAB has offered insight and advice to Ofcom on a number of issues, including helping the regulator understand how the evolution of technology will lead to the better delivery of services over wired and wireless networks, the challenges in delivering reliable in-building coverage and technologies enabling the delivery of new mobile services and meeting the future demand for wireless and mobile data.

    I hope that this report conveys a strong sense of the richness of the discussions during OSAB meetings and between OSAB and Ofcom. In addition to appointing two ex-officio members of the Committee to provide a regulator perspective on issues, OSAB‟s meetings are always attended by senior members of Ofcom who actively participate in our debates. I am particularly grateful for the presence and support at OSAB meetings of H Nwana, who in April 2013 stepped down as the Director of Ofcom‟s Spectrum Policy Group. We are looking forward to equally stimulating debates with H‟s successor.

    OSAB‟s productivity, measured by the spread of issues addressed and the quality of the advice offered, has continued to benefit from the diverse knowledge and the passion for their subject which its members bring to its meetings. I am grateful to all of them for having made the Chairman‟s job so easy.

David Meyer

    Chairman, Ofcom Spectrum Advisory Board

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OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Section 3

    Introduction

    Background

    8.1 The Ofcom Spectrum Advisory Board (OSAB) was established on 19 May 2004 to

    provide independent advice to Ofcom on strategic spectrum management issues.

    OSAB provides Ofcom with:

    ; A rapid way to test new ideas across a wide range of experts;

    ; A means of identifying issues that are beyond Ofcom‟s regulatory “headlights”;

    ; A demonstration of Ofcom‟s commitment to consult in an open and collaborative

    manner; and

    ; A mechanism to help reach an agreed industry view of difficult and contentious

    issues through the hosting of open fora.

    Annual report

    8.2 This document reports on OSAB‟s ninth year. It is intended to summarise selected

    discussions throughout the year and its content is based on published minutes of

    OSAB meetings.

    Terms of reference

    8.3 In 2008 the terms of reference for OSAB were revisited. Ofcom and OSAB agreed

    that although OSAB‟s initial role had been to provide advice to Ofcom on spectrum-

    related matters; it was increasingly difficult to consider spectrum-related matters in

    isolation in a converging world.

    8.4 Hence it was decided that OSAB‟s remit should be broadened to include all future

    communication architectures, access methods, physical layer technologies, spectrum

    issues, services and applications. OSAB would be responsible for high level and

    longer term vision and not for detailed assessment of different approaches, standard

    setting or consensus building amongst industry. However, it would not involve itself

    with content matters.

    Membership

    8.5 The membership of OSAB is reviewed on an annual basis. This year it was decided

    that there was no need to make any changes to the membership of the Committee. 8.6 Details of OSAB membership including the length of tenure are at Annex 2.

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OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Work Programme

    8.7 OSAB is responsible for agreeing its own work programme. During this year a range

    of topics was discussed, predominantly related to use and management of spectrum.

    We have organised the topics into three broad categories:

    ; Network evolution;

    ; Delivering wireless and mobile services; and

    ; Meeting future demand for wireless and mobile data.

    8.8 OSAB meets 5-6 times a year and holds an annual workshop where a whole day is

    devoted to a particular issue.

    The Year Ahead

    8.9 OSAB sets its agenda from meeting to meeting depending on progress made in

    particular areas, time available and topics arising. It deliberately does not plan a year

    ahead to allow for flexibility and responsiveness.

    Further Information

    8.10 For further information on the work of the Ofcom Spectrum Advisory Board, please

    contact the OSAB Secretary:

    Mr Paul Rogers

    Ofcom

    Riverside House

    2a Southwark Bridge Road

    London SE1 9HA

    Tel: 020 7783 4031

    E-mail: paul.rogers@ofcom.org.uk

Or visit the OSAB website at www.osab.org.uk

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OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Section 4

    Topics considered during the year 9.1 During this year a range of topics was discussed by OSAB, predominantly related to

    use and management of spectrum. We have organised the topics into three broad

    categories:

    ; Network evolution: understanding how the evolution of technologies will lead to the

    better delivery of services over wired and wireless networks;

    ; Delivering wireless and mobile services: covering the challenges in delivering

    reliable in-building coverage and technologies enabling the delivery of new mobile

    services;

    ; Meeting future demand for wireless and mobile data: continuing a longstanding

    theme of OSAB, which addresses the steps required to meet the growing demand for

    wireless and mobile data services in the medium to long term.

    9.2 We address each of these topics in turn in the sections below.

    9.3 Throughout the year, OSAB also discussed a number of topics that, for the sake of

    brevity, are not summarised here. These include an exploration of barriers to

    realising a fully functioning spectrum market to the benefit of citizens and consumers,

    including case studies of the 700MHz, 1.4GHz and 2.3GHz bands. OSAB also was

    kept informed of progress of activities on which they had provided input in the

    previous year, such as the implementation of Ofcom‟s UHF Strategy.

    9.4 More broadly, OSAB often discusses topics which explore how Ofcom‟s overall

    approach to spectrum could best address economic and wider social goals. These

    are recurring themes, to which OSAB will return in the future.

    Network evolution

    9.5 During the year, OSAB discussed a number of topics covering how technology

    developments and architectural changes are contributing to the evolution of both

    wired and wireless networks. Two such topics are summarised below. Topic 1: The evolution of fibre NGA networks

    9.6 The proliferation of internet-capable devices, such as smart phones, tablets, and

    connected TVs, is driving the consumption of data in the home. Consumer behaviour

    is changing, with a growing appetite for data hungry applications such as the BBC

    iPlayer, Netflix and YouTube. Furthermore, the advent of cloud-based applications is

    driving the capacity requirements of access networks, both to the home and business

    premises.

    9.7 Fibre-based Next Generation Access (NGA) networks will play a vital role in meeting

    this demand for data services. OSAB received a presentation which outlined the

    evolution of technologies for NGA networks and noted that:

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    OSAB Annual Report 2012 - 2013

    9.7.1 Fibre efficiency, scalable bandwidth, secure connectivity, long reach and

    costs efficient operations are highly critical to future foolproof, high capacity

    access networks.

    9.7.2 Two architectural choices for fibre deployment are: Point to Point (PtP) and

    Passive Optical Networks (PONs). PONs share a single laser across 32-64

    users so less fibre is required between the exchange and optical splitter (i.e.

    the point in the network where multiple premises are connected), thus

    reducing capex by 8-30% compared to a PtP deployment. Furthermore,

    there is less fibre to re-splice if a cable is accidentally cut. Therefore, PON

    is a suitable topology for IPTV multicast or a cable network radio frequency

    overlay.

    9.7.3 A variant of PON, WDM-PON (wavelength division multiplexing PON) offers