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By Heather Lawson,2014-06-04 18:22
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    [00:06.10]Test Two

    [00:08.18]Section A

    [00:09.82]Directions: In this section,

    [00:13.21]you will hear 8 short conversations and 2 long conversations. [00:17.58]At the end of each conversation,

    [00:20.10]one or more questions will be asked about what was said. [00:23.49]Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once.

    [00:28.30]After each question there will be a pause.

    [00:31.58]During the pause, you must read the four choices marked A), B), C)and D),

    [00:38.69]and decide which is the best answer.

    [00:41.65]Then mark the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet 2 [00:46.13]with a single line through the center.

    [00:48.87]Now let's begin with the 8 short conversations. [00:53.45]11. M: I am thinking of dropping my sociology course this semester.

    [00:59.26]I just can not understand it.

    [01:02.21]W: Keep at it, and you will catch up eventually. [01:05.05]Q: What does the woman suggest the man do?

    [01:22.58]12. M: The newspaper says that it??ll be raining today. What do you think?

    [01:29.25]W: Look, the sun??s shining.

    [01:31.44]Q: What does the woman mean?

    [01:47.23]13. W: How about a little basketball? Say Saturday or Sunday? [01:54.55]M: It sounds great. I could have a good outdoor workout. [01:59.37]These days all I have been doing is sitting in front of this computer.

    [02:03.63]Q: What can be inferred about the man?

    [02:21.54]14. M: Good morning.I??d like to know about the schedule of registration examination.

    [02:27.99]W: But it's over. We put it on the university BBS. [02:32.70]Q: What does the woman imply?

    [02:50.81]15. W: So, how did Jackson's presentation go? [02:55.62]M: It was hard to follow.And the topic he chose last time was much more interesting.

    [03:01.53]Q: What does the man mean?

    [03:18.24]16. M: I always feel like I need more hours from the day [03:23.22]to do more reading, write my essays...

    [03:26.06]W: You need to be better organized and learn to budget your

time.

    [03:30.65]Q: What does the woman mean?

    [03:46.33]17. M: Well, the milk is spilt. What a terrible mess on the carpet!

    [03:53.66]W: Don??t worry. A cup of water and a toothbrush get it out, OK?

    [03:58.25]Q: What does the woman mean?

    [04:14.87]18. W: I heard you moved to a new apartment. How is it? [04:20.77]M: Well, I wish I hadn??t.I feel like traveling everyday, though, it costs much less.

    [04:27.77]Q: What can be inferred from the passage?

    [04:44.22]Now you will hear 2 long conversations.

    [04:48.48]Conversation 1

    [04:50.89]M: Good morning. I am interested in applying for graduate school admission here.

    [04:56.68]Can you introduce it to me?

    [04:58.66]W: Alright. Do you have some specific questions? [05:01.83]M: Not really. I am here visiting a friend.And I??d like to study in this university.

    [05:08.17]W: Have you sent the application?

    [05:09.70]M: No.

    [05:10.68]W: Well, you will have to send it before Dec 31. [05:14.52]Otherwise you wi[05:18.23]M: Alright. Could you tell me what I need in my application?

    [05:22.06]W: All the information is included in the application packet. [05:26.00]All applicants to the graduate schools must have the application form,

    [05:30.81]of course, three letters of recommendation, a Personal Statement and one resume.

    [05:36.49]Also, all graduate students must have GRE or GMAT scores [05:41.91]sent to us by the testing center.

    [05:44.42]M: What about TOEFL? Can I get the admission with it? [05:48.14]W: Sorry, we don??t accept TOEFL. You can register for GRE this December.

    [05:53.50]But it will be too late to apply. Why don??t you try for the spring semester?

    [05:58.75]M: Oh, yeah, thank you. That may be more realistic. [06:03.23]Anyway, what about all the grades in university? Don??t I have to include them?

    [06:08.59]W: It will be better if you can provide the transcript. [06:12.09]And if you have any essay published or got any award, [06:15.30]please remember to include the copies.

    [06:18.47]M: What's the application fee?

    [06:20.37]W: $40.

    [06:21.80]M: Alright. Give me one application packet, please. [06:25.19]W: Here you are.

    [06:26.28]Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

    [06:31.86]19. What will the man probably do?

    [06:51.59]20. What is NOT included in an application packet? [07:12.08]21. What can we learn from the conversation? [07:31.58]Conversation 2

    [07:32.78]W: Hey Neal, now that the midterms are over. [07:37.04]A bunch of us are getting away for the weekend to go climbing the Alps.

    [07:40.87]Do you want to come along?

    [07:42.52]M: Well, it'd be great to get away, but I've never done it before.

    [07:47.44]W: None of the others have either except me. [07:50.61]I went once last fall. There'll be an instructor. [07:54.11]M: I don't know.

    [07:55.64]W: Oh, come on. This is our last chance to take a break before the finals.

    [08:01.11]The scenery is beautiful.

    [08:02.96]The mountain's really calm this time of the year, no snow slide to deal with.

    [08:08.22]M: That's a relief. What would I have to bring? [08:12.06]W: Let's see. Tom brings food for the Friday night picnic for everyone.

    [08:16.64]And the people who run the trip have tents set up [08:19.93]and they supply food and drinks for Saturday. [08:22.77]On the way back Sunday morning we'll stop somewhere for breakfast.

    [08:27.14]So, you just have to bring something that is water-proof [08:30.65]and keeps you warm and a sleeping bag.

    [08:33.60]M: Well, I do love camping and sleeping out. How can we get there?

    [08:38.09]W: Well, it's about an hour and a half to the place where we meet the trip leaders.

    [08:43.34]We leave our car there and they drive us to Switzerland. [08:46.94]M: And who's driving us to the meeting place? [08:50.00]W: Well, I was hoping we could take your car. Mine's in the shop again.

    [08:54.60]M: Oh, I see. It's not me you want, it's my car. [08:59.3[09:03.35]M: Oh, why not!

    [09:05.21]W: Great! I'll give you a call after I find out when everyone wants to leave on Friday.

    [09:11.11]Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have

just heard.

    [09:16.69]22. What is the main reason the woman calls the man? [09:37.81]23. What does the man have to bring with him?

    [09:56.69]24. What does the man say he enjoys doing?

    [10:16.79]25. What will the woman call to talk about?

    [10:36.34]Section B

    [10:37.55]Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. [10:44.75]At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. [10:48.56]Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. [10:53.16]After you hear a question,

    [10:55.13]you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D).

    [11:03.44]Then mark the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet 2 [11:07.81]with a single line through the center.

    [11:10.32]Passage 1

    [11:12.17]The next time you try for a high-ranking post, [11:16.11]you could let your possible boss listen to a recommending phone call

    [11:21.14]??made??by US President George W. Bush or British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

    [11:27.92]Of course, neither of them could really do that for you-- [11:32.08]you would just ??borrow?? their voices.

    [11:35.25]AT&T labs will start selling speech software

    [11:38.97]that it says is so good at reproducing the sounds of a human voice

    [11:43.13]that it can recreate voices

    [11:45.31]and even bring the voices of long-dead famous people back to life.

    [11:50.02]The software, which turns printed text into speech, [11:53.95]makes it possible for a company to use recordings of a person's voice to say things

    [11:59.86]that the person never actually said.

    [12:02.16]Possible customers for the software, which is priced in thousands of dollars,

    [12:07.52]include telephone call centers, companies that make software that reads digital files aloud,

    [12:13.64]and makers of automated voice devices. The advances raise several problems.

    [12:19.00]Who, for example, owns the rights to a famous person's voice? [12:23.70]And although scientists say the technology is not yet good enough to commit fraud,

    [12:28.85]would the synthesized voices at last be able to trick people into thinking

    [12:33.92]that they were getting phone calls or digital audio

recordings from people they know?

    [12:38.62]Even Mr. Fruchterman, one of AT&T lab's possible first customers,

    [12:44.09]said he wondered what the new technology might bring. [12:47.92]??Just like you can't trust a photograph any more,?? he said, [12:51.85]??you won't be able to trust a voice either.?? [12:55.35]Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.

    [13:01.15]26. What can we learn about the speech software according to the passage?

    [13:22.25]27. What can be inferred from the passage?

    [13:42.21]28. What is the purpose of the passage?

    [14:01.67]Passage 2

    [14:02.98]As on[14:06.48]rice is consumed in Asia more than in any other part of the world.

    [14:12.18]There are three groups of rice-eaters in the world. [14:15.45]The biggest refers to those who live on rice. [14:18.62]Most of them live in the Far East, numbering over 1 000 million.

    [14:24.09]To them rice is even more important than wheat is [14:28.03]to the people of Europe and North America.

    [14:30.65]The next group is made up of people who eat rice occasionally for a treat.

    [14:35.58]They mainly live in West Africa.

    [14:38.20]Most of them have come from places where little rice is consumed historically.

    [14:43.45]The third lives in countries like Europe, Australia and North America,

    [14:48.59]where rice is just something added to the menu. [14:51.65]Most kinds of rice have grains that are from 1/5 to 2/5 of an inch long.

    [14:57.67]Many Westerners like the long grain rice better, [15:01.28]and so its price is higher in the world market. [15:04.45]The short or round grain rice, which becomes sticky when cooked,

    [15:08.99]is preferred in Japan, Korea and parts of China. [15:12.92]In Britain and other European countries, round grain rice is preferred for dessert,

    [15:18.84]and long for curried rice.

    [15:21.90]Rice has as much nutriment as wheat, corn and potatoes,but unlike them,

    [15:26.71]it is not a complete food.

    [15:28.78]Other foods must be eaten to make up for what is lacking in rice, mainly protein.

    [15:34.58]So the people whose main food is rice must always be careful [15:39.06]as to what to add to their rice in order to maintain health. [15:43.66]Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.

    [15:49.02]29. What is important to the people of Europe and North America?

    [16:10.59]30. People in what countries prefer short or round grain rice? [16:31.38]31. What can be inferred from the passage?

    [16:51.06]Passage 3

    [16:52.71]Temperatures in some parts of the country have eased a bit over the weekend.

    [16:57.84]But there is no risk that throngs of people

    [17:00.69]are suddenly going to turn their backs on air-conditioning. [17:03.86]It has established itself well in the hearts of Americans. [17:08.12]The first widespread use of air-conditioners came during the 1920s

    [17:14.47]when movie theaters used what they called man-made weather [17:17.85]to lure customers to the silver screen.

    [17:20.59]After WWII, the cost for air-conditioners gradually came down [17:25.84]and manufactures advertised them as for the millions not just for millionaires.

    [17:32.43]The first air-conditioned movie theater in the United States [17:36.26]is in the Central Park Theater in Chicago.

    [17:39.66]Willis Carrier, the king of cool and the founder of air-conditioning,

    [17:44.14]actually sold his inventions to movie theater operators [17:47.64]during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. [17:52.01]This was one of the first ones to have received it. [17:55.08]And they had the [17:58.47]Right after them, the government buildings in Washington D.C were air-conditioned,

    [18:03.93]started with the US House of Representatives building, [18:07.21]the Senate building, even the White House.

    [18:10.17]It??s funny because prior to that,the lawmakers only worked from November to May,

    [18:15.53]and then they went home.

    [18:17.72]It's funny because most people say this may or may not have been a good idea

    [18:21.54]to allow them to work 12 months all over the year. [18:25.48]In the 50s when sales exceeded over one million units, [18:29.30]air-conditioning became a stable of the Middle Class. [18:33.03]And then at each decade, it increased enormously. [18:36.41]Today, probably 82% of all homes either have room air-conditioning units

    [18:42.65]or central air-conditioning units.

    [18:44.84]Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.

    [18:50.53]32. What was the first use of air-conditioners according to the passage?

    [19:10.64]33. What does the passage say about Willis Carrier? [19:31.96]34. What can we learn from the passage about government officers in America?

    [19:53.18]35. When did air-conditioning become a necessity of the Middle Class houses?

    [20:13.46]Section C

    [20:15.43]Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times.

    [20:21.78]When the passage is read for the first time, [20:24.84]you should listen carefully for its general idea. [20:28.01]When the passage is read for the second time, [20:30.85]you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from 36 to 43

    [20:36.10]with the exact words you have just heard.

    [20:38.95]For blanks numbered from 44 to 46

    [20:43.11]you are required to fill in the missing information. [20:46.17]For these blanks you can either use the exact words you have just heard

    [20:51.20]or write down the main points in your own words. [20:54.92]Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, [20:58.96]you should check what you have written.

    [21:01.48]Now listen to the passage.

    [21:05.09]Probably the most important thing kids learn is how to have peer relationships.

    [21:10.67]As a parent, you can't do this, because you and your child aren't equals.

    [21:16.24]With a friend, your child will need to learn strategies for getting what he wants.

    [21:21.60]He will learn to negotiate a trade and to wait patiently. [21:25.54]Friends also provide emotional support,

    [21:28.60]something that is part of the foundation of healthy adulthood.

    [21:32.21]You can't be with your child on the elementary school playground

    [21:36.04]or at the high school dance.

    [21:38.01]Her friends will be the ones to stick up for her, [21:40.85]to include her in games, and later,

    [21:42.71]to tell her she looks great

    [21:44.79]even if her prom date wanders off instead of dancing with her.

[21:48.83]Friends also help your children learn.

    [21:51.79]Friends solve problems together, imitate each other, and pass on knowledge.

    [21:56.8[22:02.39]later in life is her ability to make friends. [22:05.90]In fact, they claim it's even more important than IQ and grades.

    [22:10.71]This doesn't mean that the kids

    [22:12.60]who are most popular in school do the best later on in life. [22:16.65]What matters is not the number of friends a child has [22:19.93]but rather the quality of the relationships.

    [22:23.10]While it's true that popularity has many advantages, [22:27.04]it's better to have a few good friends than to have the admiration of the masses.

    [22:33.38]Now the passage will be read again.

    [22:36.22]Probably the most important thing kids learn is how to have peer relationships.

    [22:42.57]As a parent, you can't do this, because you and your child aren't equals.

    [22:47.92]With a friend, your child will need to learn strategies for getting what he wants.

    [22:53.28]He will learn to negotiate a trade and to wait patiently. [22:57.33]Friends also provide emotional support,

    [23:00.39]something that is part of the foundation of healthy adulthood.

    [23:04.11]You can't be with your child on the elementary school playground

    [23:07.83]or at the high school dance.

    [23:09.69]Her friends will be the ones to stick up for her, to include her in games, and later,

    [23:14.39]to tell her she looks great even if her prom date wanders off

    [23:18.77]instead of dancing with her.

    [23:20.74]Friends also help your children learn.

    [23:23.26]Friends solve problems together, imitate each other, and pass on knowledge.

    [23:28.61]Some experts believe that the single biggest predictor of your child's success

    [23:34.19]later in life is her ability to make friends. [24:26.18]In fact, they claim it's even more important than IQ and grades.

    [24:32.63]This doesn't mean that the kids

    [24:34.41]who are most popular in school do the best later on in life. [25:26.67]What matters is not the number of friends a child has [25:31.15]but rather the quality of the relationships.

    [25:34.33]While it's true that popularity has many advantages, [25:38.27]it's better to have a few good friends than to have the admiration of the masses.

    [26:33.60]Now the passage will be read for the third time. [26:37.21]Probably the most important thing kids learn is how to have peer relationships.

    [26:44.21]As a parent, you can't do this, because you and your child aren't equals.

    [26:49.35]With a friend, your child will need to learn strategies for getting what he wants.

    [26:54.60]He will learn to negotiate a trade and to wait patiently. [26:58.53]Friends also provide emotional support,

    [27:01.42]something that is part of the foundation of healthy adulthood.

    [27:05.58]You can't be with your child on the elementary school playground

    [27:08.86]or at the high school dance.

    [27:11.05]Her friends will be the ones to stick up for her, [27:14.11]to include her in games, and later,

    [27:15.97]to tell her she looks great even if her prom[27:20.12]instead of dancing with her.

    [27:21.76]Friends also help your children learn.

    [27:24.50]Friends solve problems together, imitate each other, and pass on knowledge.

    [27:29.97]Some experts believe that the single biggest predictor of your child's success

    [27:35.32]later in life is her ability to make friends. [27:39.04]In fact, they claim it's even more important than IQ and grades.

    [27:44.08]This doesn't mean that the kids

    [27:45.76]who are most popular in school do the best later on in life. [27:49.80]What matters is not the number of friends a child has [27:53.52]but rather the quality of the relationships. [27:56.36]While it's true that popularity has many advantages, [28:00.31]it's better to have a few good friends than to have the admiration of the masses.

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