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    Migrating Sun-based

    ?

    OracleDatabases to Dell? PowerEdge?

    Servers

    Dell PowerEdge 6450 and 8450 with

    Microsoft? Windows? 2000

    Advanced Server

    Enterprise Systems Group (ESG)

    By Dave Jaffe and Todd Muirhead

    dave_jaffe@dell.com

    todd_muirhead@dell.com

    March 2002

    Executive Summary ................................................................................................................. 3 Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 4 Solution Overview .................................................................................................................. 6 The Database Servers.............................................................................................................. 8

    The Hardware .................................................................................................................... 8

    The Software ...................................................................................................................... 9 The Application Servers ....................................................................................................... 11

    The Hardware .................................................................................................................. 11

    The Software .................................................................................................................... 11 Migrating the Application ................................................................................................... 13 The Tests ................................................................................................................................ 15 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 17 Acknowledgements............................................................................................................... 18 Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 19

    Appendix A : Baseball Database Organization ........................................................... 20

    Database Tables .............................................................................................................. 20

    Master ........................................................................................................................................... 20

    Teammaster .................................................................................................................................. 20

    Batting ........................................................................................................................................... 21

    Pitching ......................................................................................................................................... 21

    Fielding ......................................................................................................................................... 22

    Sample Query ............................................................................................................................... 22

    Figure 1: The Dell and Sun Solution Implementations ..................................................... 6

Table 1: Database Server Comparison: PowerEdge 6450 and 8450 vs. Sun Enterprise

    4500 ..................................................................................................................................... 8 Table 2: RAID Organization for Three Configurations..................................................... 9 Table 3: Oracle Database Layout .......................................................................................... 9 Table 4: Oracle9i Tuning Parameters ................................................................................. 10 Table 5: Application Servers: Dell PowerEdge 1550 vs. Sun Enterprise 220R .............. 11 Table 6: Oracle Pricing ......................................................................................................... 12 Table 7: 4-CPU Test Results: PowerEdge 6450 vs. Sun E4500 w/ 4 CPUs....................... 15 Table 8: 8-CPU Test Results: PowerEdge 8450 vs. Sun E4500 w/ 8 CPUs....................... 16 March 2002 Page 2 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

    Executive Summary

    Following studies showing the advantages of migrating Tier 1 web servers and Tier 2 application servers from Sun Microsystems, Inc. servers to Dell PowerEdge servers, this study examined the issues involved in migrating Oracle databases from the Sun/Solaris platform to the Dell/Windows platform. The study showed that Oracle database and application migration is very easily accomplished. Furthermore, Dell PowerEdge servers run Oracle9i database

    applications faster than the equivalent Sun server at roughly one-fourth the price.

A multi-tiered database application was built with Oracle9i Application Server

    (Oracle9iAS) on a Sun Enterprise 220R rack-mounted server driving Oracle9i

    Database Server on a Sun Enterprise 4500 midrange server. The E4500 was configured with either four or eight processors. A moderately sized database of baseball statistics was built on the database server. Using the portal component within Oracle9iAS, a web portal was created that allows on-line users to submit queries to the database that list the top 10 players in any of 20 statistical categories (home runs, earned run average, etc.) for the years 1901 2000.

    The baseball database and portal application (which are both stored in the back-end database) were then migrated to a Dell configuration using the Dell PowerEdge 1550 as the application server running Oracle9iAS and either the

    PowerEdge 6450 (4 CPUs) or the PowerEdge 8450 (8 CPUs) for the Oracle9i

    Database server. Migration was simply a matter of using the Oracle export/import commands plus a script generated by the Oracle9iAS Portal

    manager. The entire migration process took about 20 minutes for our midsize database.

    Testing with an internal web stress tool showed that the PowerEdge servers are faster than the corresponding Sun servers, at about one fourth the price (see Table 1). With a reasonable “think time” of 10 seconds between requests, the 4-

    CPU PowerEdge 6450 can easily handle 450 simultaneous users while the 8-CPU PowerEdge 8450 can handle 700 users; in comparison, the Sun systems handled the same number of users with higher response times and greater CPU use.

    March 2002 Page 3 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

    Introduction

    Sun to Dell migration issues have been studied in a series of papers from Dell Enterprise System Group’s Solution Enablement Lab and Showcase (see complete list in Section10, Bibliography). With a target audience of customers

    currently running servers from Sun Microsystems, Inc. but interested in migrating to Dell PowerEdge servers, the papers showed the ease and benefits of migrating low-end web servers and mid-tier application servers from the Sun platform to the Dell PowerEdge platform. In those tests, however, the Oracle database remained on a Sun server.

    The current study targets a customer who is now ready to migrate their entire Oracle application server and database stack to Dell PowerEdge servers. To demonstrate the migration we have selected a multitiered web application using Oracle9i Application Server (including the Apache web server) on one machine driving Oracle9i Database Server running on a second machine. The back-end database consists of a moderately sized database of baseball statistics. A web application was written using Oracle9iAS Portal, a component of Oracle9i

    Application Server, to enable users to generate Top 10 lists for any of 20 different statistics over 100 years.

    The web application was first implemented on a Sun Enterprise 220R 2-CPU application server driving a Sun Enterprise E4500 database server, both running Solaris 8.0. The E4500 was configured with either four 450 MHz UltraSPARC II processors and 4 GB of memory or eight such CPUs and 8 GB of memory. On the Dell side, the PowerEdge 1550 2-CPU application server with Microsoft Windows 2000 Server was used to drive either the 4-CPU PowerEdge 6450 or the 8-CPU PowerEdge 8450, each running Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server.

    The Oracle9i baseball database was easily migrated from the Sun E4500 to both PowerEdge servers with the Oracle export and import feature. Since Oracle9i

    Application Server stores its application data in the backend Oracle database it was a simple matter to migrate the portal web application from the Sun application server to the Dell application server.

    Once ported, the application ran better on the Dell servers with their multi-threaded Windows 2000 implementation of Oracle9i Database than on the Sun

    E4500 server with its Solaris single-threaded process model, and was much easier to tune. This in spite of the fact that the Dell servers, both the 4-CPU PowerEdge 6450 and the 8-CPU PowerEdge 8450, are about one fourth the cost of the comparatively configured Sun E4500. (See Table 1.) An internal stress tool used

    March 2002 Page 4 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

    in earlier tests was utilized in this test to generate queries against the database

    and record response times.

    A full description of the application is given in Section 3, Solution Overview,

    followed by details of The Database Servers and The Application Servers in

    Section 4 and Section 5. Migration details are in Section 6, Migrating the

    Application, followed by test details in Section 7, The Tests.

    March 2002 Page 5 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

    Solution Overview

    To demonstrate Oracle database migration and measure relative performance, a multi-tiered database application was built on a Sun server stack and then migrated to two different Dell stacks (see Figure 1: The Dell and Sun Solution Implementations). The Sun Enterprise E4500 was run with either 4 or 8 processors to compare to the Dell PowerEdge 6450 or Dell PowerEdge 8450, respectively.

     Sun4 E4500 Ora6450d PE6450 Ora8450a PE8450 4x or 8x 450 MHz SPARC 4x 700 MHz PIII Xeon 8x 700 MHz PIII Xeon Database 4 or 8 GB Memory 4 GB Memory 8 GB Memory Server 2x18GB Disks internal 3x18GB Disks internal 3x18GB Disks internal 8 x 36 GB Disks RAID 10 8 x 36 GB Disks RAID 10 8 x 36 GB Disks RAID 10 Layer Solaris 8.0 7/01 Windows 2000 Adv Server Windows 2000 Adv Server Oracle9i DBOracle9i DBOracle9i DB

     10.3.2.154 10.3.2.4 10.3.2.10

     100 BT Switch 100 BT Switch 100 BT Switch 10.3.210.3.210.3.2

    10.3.2.156 10.3.2.105 10.3.2.106

     Sun6 E220R Dell5 PowerEdge 1550 Dell6 PowerEdge 1550 2x 450 MHz SPARC 2x 900 MHz Pentium 3 2x 1GHz Pentium 3 Application 2 GB Memory 1 GB Memory 2 GB Memory 2x 36GB Disks 3x 9GB Disks 3x 9GB Disks Server Solaris 8 Windows 2000 Server Windows 2000 Server Layer Oracle9i AS Oracle9i AS Oracle9i AS

    10.3.0.156 10.3.0.105 10.3.0.106

     100 BT Switch 100 BT Switch 100 BT Switch 10.3.0 10.3.0 10.3.0

     Firewall, routers, etc. Firewall, routers, etc. Firewall, routers, etc.

     Users on browsers Users on browsers Users on browsers

Figure 1: The Dell and Sun Solution Implementations

    March 2002 Page 6 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

The application architecture is the same in all three cases. Oracle9i Application

    Server, including the Apache web server and Oracle9iAS Portal, runs on the

    Application Server layer. (In this study a single server was employed in this layer. In a future study multiple Oracle9iAS servers will be used to provide

    redundancy and performance scaling). An Oracle Procedural

    Language/Structured Query Language (PL/SQL) application runs under the mod_plsql module of Apache, calling a stored procedure on the backend Oracle database. Oracle9iAS Portal provides a web-based platform for creating these web applications with appropriate security, authentication and caching.

    A database of baseball statistics, Baseball Archive Database 4.0, was obtained from Sean Lahman at http://www.baseball1.com/statistics in Microsoft Access

    form, exported as comma-separated values, and then loaded into Oracle tables with the sqlldr command. The database contains batting, pitching and fielding data for 15,558 players going back to 1886 (See Database Tables in Appendix A).

    Using Oracle9iAS Portal, dynamic PL/SQL pages were created that enable a web user to display the Top 10 leaders in any of 20 statistical categories for any year between 1901 and 2000, and for either the American or National Leagues, or both, a total of 6,000 unique queries.

The input required by Oracle9iAS Portal for each dynamic web page is the

    Oracle SELECT statement to generate the corresponding Top 10 table (see

    Sample Query in Appendix A). Oracle9iAS Portal generates the PL/SQL

    wrapper code that creates the connection to the backend database, calls the query and caches the resulting page. Oracle9iAS stores all of these components in the

    backend database, facilitating application backup and migration. Oracle9iAS

    Portal provides a web-based GUI to manage the dynamic pages and other components.

    March 2002 Page 7 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

The Database Servers

The Hardware

    The Sun server for both the 4-CPU and 8-CPU configurations was an Enterprise

    4500 midrange server running the July 2001 version of Solaris 8.0. In both

    configurations the E4500 used 64-bit UltraSPARC-II 450 MHz CPUs. Both the

    Dell 4-CPU PowerEdge 6450 and the Dell 8-CPU PowerEdge 8450 ran Windows

    2000 Advanced Server on 700 MHz Intel? Xeon? processors based on the Intel

    32 bit architecture. See Table 1: Database Server Comparison: PowerEdge 6450

    and 8450 vs. Sun Enterprise 4500 for details.

     Dell PowerEdge 6450 Dell PowerEdge 8450 Sun Enterprise 4500

    Operating System Windows 2000 Windows 2000 Solaris 8.0 7/01

    Advanced Server Advanced Server

    CPU 4x 700 MHz Pentium 8x 700 MHz Pentium 4-CPU: 4 x 450 MHz

    III Xeon III Xeon 8-CPU: 8 x 450 MHz

    UltraSPARC-II

    CPU L2 Cache 2 MB 2 MB 8MB

    Memory 4 GB 8 GB 4-CPU: 4 GB

    8-CPU: 8 GB

    Internal Disk 4x 18 GB* 2x 36 GB* 2x 36 GB*

    External Disk PowerVault 210S - 10x PowerVault 210S 10x StorEdge D1000 8 x

    18 GB 18 GB 36 GB

    NICs 2x 100 Mb/s (1 internal, 2x 100 Mb/s (1 PCI 1x 100 Mb/s (I/O card)

    1 PCI card) card)

    RAID Controller 2x PERC/2 Dual 2x PERC/2 Dual A3500FC RAID

    Channel Channel Controller

    Video On-board On-board Remote console

    Height 4 Rack Unit (4U) or 7” 7 Rack Unit (7U) or 8 Rack Units (8U) or

    12.25” 14”

    Price as configured $32,683 $62,437 4-CPU: $147,085

    8-CPU: $228,885

    Source http://www.dell.com http://www.dell.com http://www.sun.com

    2/15/02 2/15/02 2/15/02

    *For hard drives, GB means 1 billion bytes; total accessible capacity varies depending on operating environment.

    Table 1: Database Server Comparison: PowerEdge 6450 and 8450 vs. Sun

    Enterprise 4500

March 2002 Page 8 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

    The Sun and the Dell database servers were configured with similar external

    SCSI storage. The Sun server was attached via fibre channel to a Sun StorEdge

    A3500FC controller that drove a single StorEdge D1000 disk pod containing 8

    36GB SCSI disks. The Dell PowerEdge 6450 and 8450 were attached to Dell

    PowerVault 210S SCSI disk pod through Dell PowerEdge RAID Controller/2

    (PERC/2) PCI cards. Each PV210S was configured with 10 18GB disks. The RAID

    configuration on the disks, shown in Table 2: RAID Organization for Three

    Configurations, was created to be as similar to each other as possible, but due to

    differing numbers of internal disks on each server there were slight differences in

    the RAID configurations.

Logical Disk Dell PowerEdge 6450 Dell PowerEdge 8450 Sun Enterprise 4500

     0 RAID 1 Internal Disks 0,1 RAID 1 Internal Disks 0,1 Internal Disk 0

     1 RAID 1 Internal Disks 2,3 RAID 1 210S Disks 0,1 RAID 1 D1000 Disks 0,1

     2 RAID 1 210S Disks 0,1 RAID 1 210S Disks 2,3 RAID 1 D1000 Disks 2,3

     3 RAID 1/0 210S Disks RAID 1/0 210S Disks RAID 1/0 D1000 Disks

    2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 4,5,6,7,8,9 4,5,6,7

    Table 2: RAID Organization for Three Configurations

The Software

    Oracle9i Database was installed using the Oracle Universal Installer on both

    Windows 2000 and Solaris 8. The same options were selected on both. Oracle9i

    installation was completed without creating an initial database. The Oracle

    Database Creation Assistant (DBCA) was then used to create a new database

    instance using similar settings on the two platforms. The control files, log files,

    and data files were placed on different partitions of the external storage and the

    shared server option was used (see Table 3: Oracle Database Layout). We also

    applied the appropriate patch set on each platform to take 9i to the 9.0.1.1.2 level.

    Logical Oracle Windows Solaris

    Disk Use Partition Size (GB) Partition Size (GB)

    0 Oracle C: 16.83 /u01 6.33

    Binaries

    1 Control files, D: 16.87 /u02 33.36

    Logs, Misc.

    2 Undo E: 16.87 /u03 33.36

    tablespace

    3 Users F: 67.49 (6450) /u04 66.71

    tablespace, 50.60 (8450)

    Indexes

    Table 3: Oracle Database Layout

March 2002 Page 9 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

The database initialization parameters are listed in Table 4: Oracle9i Tuning

    Parameters. For the most part the Sun E4500 and the PowerEdge 8450 were set up the same way to facilitate 8-CPU comparison. The large pool and shared pool were set at 400MB to provide sufficient space for the largest number of simultaneous users. Processes were limited to 200 and sessions to 300 to optimize performance for the web application on both platforms. On the Dell 8-CPU system the minimum number of shared servers was set to 40 (with more created by Oracle dynamically up to a maximum of 160) but on the Sun it was found that 80 shared servers were needed to be on hand at all times, perhaps due to the larger CPU requirement to create and destroy new shared server processes under Solaris vs. new shared server threads under Windows. The number of DB writer processes was set equal to the number of processors. The parameters on the PowerEdge 6450 are scaled down to reflect the lower concurrent usage.

Parameter Dell Dell Sun

    PowerEdge PowerEdge Enterprise

    6450 8450 4500

    DB_BLOCK_SIZE 8192 8192 8192

    DB_CACHE_SIZE 117440512 117440512 117440512

    DB_WRITER_PROCESSES 4 8 8

    DISPATCHERS 16 16 16

    LARGE_POOL_SIZE 200000000 400000000 400000000

    MAX_DISPATCHERS 40 40 40

    MAX_SHARED_SERVERS 80 160 160

    OPEN_CURSORS 400 400 400

    PROCESSES 200 200 200

    SESSIONS 220 300 300

    SHARED_POOL_SIZE 200000000 400000000 400000000

    SHARED_SERVER_SESSIONS 210 285 285

    SHARED_SERVERS 32 40 80

    SORT_AREA_SIZE 64000000 64000000 64000000

Table 4: Oracle9i Tuning Parameters

    March 2002 Page 10 Dell Enterprise Systems Group

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