DOC

The best known and most widely discussed poem about the real and

By Judy Gonzales,2014-05-09 22:44
5 views 0
The best known and most widely discussed poem about the real and

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    Goblin Market and Lamia:

    Seductive Figures of Temptation and Desire in Femininity

    The world of Goblin Market and Lamia both provoke and stimulate the ideal of

    women‟s temptation and desire for men, of women‟s entrapment and sacrifice for evil,

    and of women‟s moral and tragic vision in communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love with characters in their society. In Goblin Market, Christina Rossetti

    describes how her poem is a Gothic fantasy where childish cruelty and childish sexuality are the main issues. She presents her poem and her text full of life, action, and color. The poet writes her poem as a fairy tale for children and an allegory that establishes her claim to „immortality.‟ Unlike Rossetti, John Keats writes his poem in Lamia as the conflict

    between poetry and philosophy, or between sensation and reflection. He presents his poem about how Lamia can move easily in the world of gods and in the world of men, and that her dreams of gods are real, but her temptation for men are unreal. Both Rossetti and Keats demonstrate how their poem uses consistent themes of feminine temptation and feminine desire for men. Rossetti would view Laura‟s desire as “the cause of all

    destruction” while Keats would view Lamia‟s desire as “the continuation of fantasy.

    Both Laura and Lamia believes that they must go beyond their deception and destruction in order for them to acquire communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love. Nevertheless, Rossetti and Keats both use images of feminine temptation and feminine desire in Goblin Market and Lamia to represent the contrast between male/female

    relationships and female/female relationships, ultimately suggesting that both Laura and Lamia experience feminine desire in similar ways, but that the poems perceive the effects

     1

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

differently, or that the outcomes are different in their moral and tragic vision of women‟s

    love and sacrifice for communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love.

    So the question arises: how do Goblin Market and Lamia use images of feminine

    temptation and feminine desire as a testimony to women‟s love and sacrifice for

    communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love? In Goblin Market, Rossetti use

    images of feminine temptation and feminine desire to illustrate the difference between the desire between Laura and the Goblin Men and the desire between Laura and Lizzie. She opens her poem about Laura and Lizzie desire to buy luscious fruits from the goblin men. The poet writes, “Come buy our orchard fruits / Come buy, come buy,” the goblins cry.

    Lizzie would warn Laura not to look at the evil eyes of the goblin men; but Laura, who cannot resist the desire, gives in to the goblins conscience. When Laura first observes the goblin men, she describes them to Lizzie as “little men” (l.55). Rossetti writes:

    “One had a cat’s face,

    One whisked a tail,

    One tramped at a rat’s pace.

    One crawled like a snail,

    One like a wombat prowled obtuse and furry,

    One like a ratel tumbled hurry skurry.

    In this passage, we see that Rossetti describes the goblin men as both animals as well as humans. Before Laura interacts with the goblin men, she sees that they communicate in lovely, innocent tones. The poet writes:

    “She [Laura] heard a voice like voice of doves

    Cooing all together;

    They sounded kind and full of loves

    In the pleasant weather.

     2

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

However, Laura would later realize that the goblin men are “cross-grained, uncivil” (l.

    395) and “shrill” (l.89); they “grunt,” “snarl,” “bark,” and “hiss” (ll. 393-402). The

    goblin men are fiery and are not lightly to be rebelled against. The goblins allurement to Laura would represent the fragmented self which gives in to sensual pleasure. In other words, the desire between Laura and the goblin men are viewed as Laura‟s feminine

    temptation to acquire spiritual love with men and the goblin men temptation for self-pleasure.

    Unlike the desire between Laura and the goblin men, the desire between Laura and Lizzie is viewed as Lizzie‟s love, sacrifice, courageous, and selfless act to protect her sister well-being. When Laura becomes sick by eating the luscious fruits from the goblin men, we see that Lizzie goes out of her way and saves her from death by approaching the goblin men to buy more of their luscious fruits. As soon as Lizzie approaches the goblin men, the goblins‟ decided to rape her after she has refused to eat and buy their fruits. Rossetti writes:

    “Lashing their tails

    They trod and hustled her.

    Elbowed and jostled her,

    Clawed with their nails,

    Barking, mewing, hissing, mocking,

    Tore her gown and soiled her stocking,

    Twitched her hair out by the roots,

    Stamped upon her tender feet,

    Held her hands and squeezed their fruits

    Against her mouth to make her eat.”

    The actions described in these lines are quite brutal here. But Lizzie‟s brave act to encounter the goblin men shows her willingness to sacrifice her own life for the people who she loves and cares most. She didn‟t want Laura to end up like Jeanie did when she

     3

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    ate the goblin men fruits and dies a couple days later. Her own brave act is a valuable lesson about her own capabilities, the virtues of self-abandonment, and the untouched

    effects of male sexual violence. In other words, Lizzie is described as a strong but passive figure. The desire between Laura and Lizzie can simply be viewed as Lizzie‟s love for

    Laura. Laura views of desires occur with her feminine temptation for men while Lizzie views of desire occurs with her sacrifice for others. They both convey the difference between the desire of male and female relationships.

    Compare with Goblin Market, Keats in Lamia use images of feminine temptation

    and feminine desire to illustrate the difference between the desire between Lamia and Lycius and the desire between Lamia and Apollonius. In the poem, Keats describes Lamia as the poetic imagination while Lycius as the poet. Like the goblin men, Lamia too

    s an animal. Keats writes, "Striped like a is viewed as deceptive and destructive, and a

    Zebra, freckled like a pard, / Eyed like a peacock" (I. 49-50). In addition, Lamia is also

    described as both a virgin and a whore. The poet writes: “A virgin purest lipp’d, yet in

    the lore / Of love deep learned to the red heart’s core” (I.189-190). Lamia sexual desire

    for men would go beyond anything natural. The sexual symbolism of Lamia suggests that she is a phallic woman, and an imaginary figure of dream, myth, art and literature. The context of this imagery is clearest during the final scene, where Lycius dies. Lycius death is viewed as a result from Lamia‟s disappearance as well as Lycius rejection of masculine identity. The sexual symbolism in the final scene portrays how Lycius would use the wedding feast to satisfy his own desire for Lamia, and that the wedding feast reveals Lamia‟s beauty as a symbol of Lycius masculine identity. Lycius desire suggests that

     4

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    Lamia has come to form a significant part of his new identity as a man. In other words, the desire between Lamia and Lycius is viewed to be Lycius temptation to acquire self-love with Lamia and his illusions of femininity. He desperately desires to win and experience Lamia as a “delight” (l. 327), a “pleasure” (l. 327), and finally as a “treat” (l.

    330). An example of Lycius self-love is when he looks into Lamia‟s eye and sees himself

    “mirror’d small in paradise” (II. 47), and calls Lamia “My silver planet” (II. 48), as if

    she is a planet in orbit around him as a sun. Besides the desire between Lamia and Lycius, the desire between Lamia and Apollonius is viewed to be differently. In the poem, Lycius first describes Apollonius as a “trusty guide / And good instructor” (l. 375-376). But later,

    Keats describes Apollonius as a “cold philosophy” (ll. 234-237) man that “will clip an

    Angel’s wings” and “Unweave a rainbow” (ll. 234-237). Apollonius would later describe

    Lycius as a “Fool!” (ll. 295) while Lycius would describe Apollonius as “demon eyes”

    (ll. 289) that “withers at their potency” (ll. 290). In other words, Apollonius critical

    attitude with Lycius represents him as an aggressively selfish individual. Apollonius would call Lamia a “Serpent!” (ll. 305) because how self-critical she can be to people. Lycius would die in the end to avoid dealing with Apollonius. But the main two causes of his death are Lamia disappearance and Lycius identity as a man. Nevertheless, Lycius‟s

    masculine identity and desire have become fatefully intertwined with the illusion of femininity, the nature of a serpent, and the image of a phallic woman. Lycius is an aspiring poet, Lamia is a sensuous ideal, and Apollonius is the reason or common sense of life.

     5

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    Both Laura and Lamia feminine temptation and feminine desire for men is viewed to be deceptive and destructive in their moral and tragic vision from the reality of supernaturalism and the self for communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love. Laura wanted to have love relationship with the Goblin men in order for her to acquire communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love while Lamia wanted to have a love relationship with Lycius in order for her to acquire communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love. Both novels would illustrate how one must first escape from the reality of supernaturalism and discover the self before one can acquire feminine temptation and feminine desire for men. In Goblin Market, the death of Jeannie suggests

    the ultimately selfish (i.e. anti-communal) aspect of feminine desire; while the end with the mothers and children suggests the more communal type of desire (i.e. desire in social accepted form - marriage). In Lamia, the death of Lycius becomes a metaphor as a result

    of denying masculine identity, and cannot be from Apollonius unless we argue that he should have been able to anticipate that Lycius would die as a result of disclosure. Nevertheless, both Goblin Market and Lamia would effectively presents a theme of

    women‟s “self-discover” using consistent images of temptation and desire to relate to

    their love and sacrifice in male/female relationships and female/female relationships. Laura wanted to learn more about her inner-self when she decides to meet the Goblin men while Lamia wanted to learn more about her inner-self when she decides to have a love affair with Lycius. They both learn how their moral and tragic vision for communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love is viewed to be deceptive and destructive in their society. In other words, both Laura and Lamia experience desire in similar ways, but

     6

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    that the poems perceive the effects differently, or that the outcomes are viewed to be different.

    In closing, both Goblin Market and Lamia demonstrate throughout their poems

    how male/female relationships are more focused on „profane love‟ while female/female relationships are more focused on „spiritual love.‟ In Goblin Market, Rossetti functions as

    a parable on a moral crisis of women‟s independent choice and women‟s dependence on

    men while Lamia, on the other hand, emphasizes the complex ambiguities of Lamia and Lycius as the emotional and intellectual response to their actions. Both Goblin Market

    and Lamia describes how the objects, personae, and action seem to call forth specific allegorical or symbolic significance. They would simply contain sensuous imagery and spiritual meaning. Rossetti outlines throughout her poem how happy woman would be if men do not exist while Keats outlines throughout his poem the fear of the feminine figure using the death of Lycius as a form of castration, desolation, and loss of identity. Both poems would use different imagery in characters to describe the significance of the poem. Nevertheless, Rossetti and Keats both use images of feminine temptation and feminine desire in Goblin Market and Lamia to represent the contrast between male/female

    relationships and female/female relationships, ultimately suggesting that both Laura and Lamia experience feminine desire in similar ways, but that the poems perceive the effects differently, or that the outcomes are different in their moral and tragic vision of women‟s

    love and sacrifice for communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love.

     7

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    Reference

Baldick, Chris. The Concise Dictionary of Literary Terms. New York: Oxford University

    Press, 2004.

Ferguson, Margaret. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. New York: W. W. Norton, 2004.

Lathrop, Michael. Week 4 and 7 Lecture. Fall 2007.

    Mayberry, Katherine. Christina Rossetti and The Poetry of Discovery. New York: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.

    Sjoholm, Cecilia. Ethics and the Invention of Feminine Desire. New York: Stanford University Press, 2004.

Waldoff, Leon. Keats and the Silent Work of Imagination. New York: University of

    Illinois Press, 1985.

    Goblin Market.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 4 December 2007 < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goblin_Market >.

    Lamia.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 5 December 2007 < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamia_poem >.

    Christina Rossetti.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 5 December 2007 < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_rossetti >.

    “John Keats.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 6 December 2007 < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Keats >.

    Housman, Laurence. Illustrations of Goblin Market. October 17, 2005. < http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/crossetti/gobmarket.html >

     8

Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

    Roy,

    I think you‟ve got a good approach going here, mostly limited by your desire to have everything fit neatly together, which I don‟t think is going to work as well as a more nuanced approach might. Try to find both the similarities and differences between

    Laura‟s and Lamia‟ desire. I think that will produce a more interesting and workable essay for you.

    At issue for me is whether the either poem is totally against feminine desire… I don‟t think so. Rather, I have suggested that Goblin Market poses a binary ~ sex outside

    of marriage (Jeannie, Laura) is bad; sex for having children (Laura, Lizzie ) is good. You might, though, think about the difference between the desire between Laura and the Goblin Men and the desire between Laura and Lizzie, which is configured very differently.

    In any event, there is a clear ethical divide in GM that is harder for me to see in

    Lamia. Yeah, Lamia has a lot of negative associations to her, but she‟s got a lot of good associations too. One thing that‟s always bothered me about this poem is that Apollonius never says what the danger is; he just claims she‟s dangerous. But Lycius isn‟t exactly

    suffering, no? And is there any sense of something bad happening between Lycius and Lamia? Things don‟t start getting iffy until Apollonius shows up, and then it becomes nearly foreordained that trouble will come. But only because Apollonius is there…

    Ultimately, I think your argument will work, if you‟re willing to say that Laura and Lamia both experience the desire in one way, but that the poems perceive the effects differently, or that the outcomes are different.

    You‟ve got an excellent and interesting mind. I‟m looking forward to reading this essay. Best,

    Mr. L

    Outline for Paper 3

    ; Paragraph 1 (Introduction): Thesis Statement - Nevertheless, both Rossetti and

    Keats both use images of feminine temptation and feminine desire in Goblin

    Market and Lamia to represent the contrast between male/female relationships

    and female/female relationships, ultimately suggesting that both Laura and Lamia

    experience feminine desire in similar ways, but that the poems perceive the

    effects differently, or that the outcomes are different in their moral and tragic

    vision of women‟s love and sacrifice for communal identity, sensuous pleasure,

    and spiritual love.

     9

    Roy Chan

    SID: 94105908

    Prompt #3

    December 10, 2007

; Paragraph 2: Rossetti use images of women‟s entrapment and sacrifice of the

    Goblin men to illustrate Laura and Lizzie feminine temptation and feminine

    desire for men.

    o Rossetti describes „the goblins‟ as a symbol of the fragmented self

    o Rossetti describes „the fruit‟ as a symbol of sin.

    ; Hence, Rossetti utilizes the word „sin‟ as a symbol of sacrifice and

    love.

    ; Paragraph 3: Keats use images of women‟s entrapment and sacrifice of Lamia to

    illustrate Lycius feminine temptation and feminine desire for men.

    o Keats describes „Laura‟ as a symbol of spiritual freedom, relaxation, and

    romantic possibility

    o Keats describes „Lycius death‟ as a symbol of Laura‟s recognition of her

    serpent nature.

    ; Paragraph 4 (Compare and Contrast): Laura and Lamia feminine temptation and

    feminine desire of men is viewed to be deceptive and destructive in their moral

    vision as they are trapped by their unawareness acceptance view of society and

    must earn their communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love by

    escaping from the reality of supernaturalism and the self.

    o Laura wanted to have a love relationship with the Goblin men in order for

    her to acquire communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love.

    o Lamia wanted to have a love relationship with Lycius in order for her to

    acquire communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love

    o Both novel showed how communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and

    spiritual love has to be earned, and that one must first escape from the

    reality of supernaturalism and the self before one can have feminine

    temptation and feminine desire of men. In other words, Goblin Market and

    Lamia effectively presents a theme of “self-discover” using consistent

    images of temptation and desire to relate to women‟s entrapment and

    sacrifice.

    ; Laura was able to learn more about herself when she decides to

    meet the Goblin men.

    ; Lamia was able to learn more about her when she decides to have a

    love affair with Lycius.

    ; They both learn about their moral vision for communal

    identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love.

    ; Paragraph 5 (Conclusion): In closing, both Laura and Lamia learn that their inner,

    private values are not comparable with public ones, and they both measure their

    achievement by their ability to realize restrictions. Laura and Lamia entrapment

    and sacrifice for men is viewed to be deceptive and destructive in their moral

    vision for communal identity, sensuous pleasure, and spiritual love.

     10

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com