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The Guardian (UK): Scepticism greets launch of - UNEP

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The Guardian (UK): Scepticism greets launch of - UNEPThe

    THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE NEWS

    Friday, 28 April 2006

     UNEP and the Executive Director in the News

    ; Scepticism greets launch of ethical investment initiative (The Guardian)

    ; U.N. chief rings NYSE opening bell (United Press International)

     ; The Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec is one of the signatories to the

     UN's Principles for Responsible Investment (Canada News Wire)

     ; Annan lanza en Wall Street Principios de la Inversión Responsable (Terra

     Actualidad)

     ; UN Launches 'Principles For Responsible Investment' (Business Wire)

     ; Pension funds sign ESG pact (Global Investor)

     ; L'ONU marque le 20e anniversaire de la catastrophe nucléaire de Tchernobyl (Xinhua)

     ; Tchernobyl la catastrophe nucléaire vue par les Nations Unies (Actualites News Environnement) ; Alexander Alusa, Codirecteur Des Conventions Environnementales Du PNUE (L'Express) ; Green tips for 15 Iraqis (Gulf Daily News) ; Chinese president arrives for 2-day visit (The Daily Nation) Other Environment News ; VC firms are seeing green in energy (CNN Money) ; Ford to Promote Green Investments to Consumers (Reuters) ; Partisan Vote Advances Bush Nominee to Head EPA Air Office (Environment News Service)

    ; 'Green' Roof Unveiled by U.S. Architect Group Showcases Global Trend (Associated

    Press)

    ; OGM : les producteurs de maïs contraints de se cacher (Le Figaro)

    ; March of the (endangered) penguins (The Miami Herald)

    ; China releases panda to the wild (BBC)

     Environmental News from the UNEP Regions

    ; ROA

    ; Brazil Office

     Other UN News

    ; UN Daily News of 27 April 2006

    ; S.G.‘s Spokesman Daily Press Briefing of 27 April 2006

    Communications and Public Information, P.O. Box 30552, Nairobi, Kenya

    Tel: (254-2) 623292/93, Fax: [254-2] 62 3927/623692, Email:cpiinfo@unep.org, http://www.unep.org

    The Guardian (UK): Scepticism greets launch of ethical investment initiative David Teather

    28.4. 2006

    We've heard it all before, say green groups, as Kofi Annan and funds list six principles Financial institutions that manage $2,000bn (?1,100bn) of assets promised yesterday to haul ethical investment into the mainstream with the launch of Principles for Responsible Investment. The scheme, crafted with the United Nations, was launched with some pomp at the New York Stock Exchange, where the UN secretary general, Kofi Annan, rang the bell that marks the start of each day's trading. He was flanked by signatories from the 32 pension funds, foundations and government funds that have joined the scheme, including Hermes, which runs BT's pension fund. They called the guidelines "historic".

    But the initiative was met with scepticism by environmental groups. "It seems we get some kind of funky new initiative every other week," said Craig Bennett of Friends of the Earth. "Voluntary initiatives make very little difference, if at all. Do we really think that in the boardroom when it comes to crunch decisions about competitiveness, lowering costs and sourcing that they have any impact?"

    The six guiding principles comprise incorporating environmental, social and corporate governance issues (ESG) into investment analysis; becoming more active investors (filing resolutions consistent with ESG policies, for instance); seeking greater transparency from companies; promoting implementation of the principles among other financial institutions, pooling resources, and reporting on progress. The guidelines took almost a year to draw up. Colin Melvin, head of corporate governance at Hermes, said: "The significance is that this is investor-led. These are some of the biggest asset managers in the world getting together to accept responsibility for their investments. This is part of a general development in [ethical investment] and I think it will accelerate things."

    The initiative does not aim to draw up lists of banned or preferred companies but instead to engage with boards, to set in place sustainable environmental and social policies. More straightforward ethical investment, excluding oil or defence companies for instance, has become popular in Britain. According to the research group EIRIS, the amount in ethical funds has grown from $200m in 1989 to an estimated $5bn.

    The size of the funds signing up to the UN scheme suggests that they might have some clout. The only other British fund in the initial 32 is the Universities Superannuation Scheme. Signatories also include the New York City Employees' Retirement System, the Norwegian state pension fund and CalPERs, the largest public pension fund in the US.

    Nevertheless, the latest initiative has disappointing precedents. A report from the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development in 2003 said that voluntary guidelines rarely produced positive results. "There are only a few cases where [voluntary initiatives] have contributed to environmental improvements significantly different from what would have happened anyway," it concluded.

    Greenpeace was similarly leery of the scheme. "Superficially, it is a good idea. How could anyone be opposed? But the real problem is in the detail," said John Sauven. "Companies

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    produce good corporate social responsibility reports and look like they have a strong commitment on paper. But when you delve into the detail, they are found wanting. "We are living in a world with a globalised system of trade that is moving sourcing and manufacturing to low-cost countries and the relationship is becoming more complex and distant. How do they know if indigenous people are being moved or forests cleared? Companies themselves actually know very little even though they might think they know a lot." Mr Bennett drew unfavourable comparisons with the 2002 "Equator Principles" drawn up to guide banks but which he claims have since been ignored by signatories when it was expedient. "We were promised so much 10 years ago on all this but we haven't seen a fundamental change in City behaviour yet and people are becoming sceptical," he said. "What we really need to see is politicians putting measures in place to change companies' behaviour."

    ____________________________________________________________________________ United Press International: U.N. chief rings NYSE opening bell

    27.4.2006

    U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan Thursday rang the opening bell to start trading on the New York Stock Exchange.

    It is believed to be the first time a chief administrative officer of the world organization opened trading.

    "My role at the United Nations typically keeps me from taking sides, today I hope my presence helps to trigger the bulls and not the bears!" he said at the NYSE. Annan was present for the launching of The Principles for Responsible Investment, what he described as "a set of global best-practice principles."

    Until recently it would have been unusual for the secretary-general to make such an appearance, he said. "Galvanized in particular by the advance of globalization and trade, there has been a profound convergence between the goals of the United Nations and those of the private sector and financial markets."

    He said: "The U.N. objectives -- peace, security, development -- go hand-in-hand with prosperity and growing markets. If societies fall, so will markets."

    The secretary-general recalled his effort to enlist corporate cooperation in The U.N. Global Compact, what has become "the world's largest corporate responsibility initiative," now with nearly 3,000 corporate participants and other stakeholders involved.

    In a separate initiative he said that more than 160 banks, insurers, fund managers and others are involved in the U.N. Environmental Program's Finance Initiative.

    "But a serious gap has become obvious," Annan said. "There is a disconnect between corporate responsibility... and the actual behavior of financial markets which all-too-often are guided primarily short-term considerations at the expense of longer term objectives." The new initiative offers "a path for integrating environmental, social and governance criteria into investment analysis and ownership practices," he said, adding that if implemented, the principles potentially can align investment practices with U.N. goals.

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Canada News Wire: The Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec is one of the signatories to the UN's Principles for Responsible Investment

    27.4.2006

    The Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec is one of the original signatories to the United Nations' Principles for Responsible Investment unveiled this morning in New York.

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     The Caisse is one of 25 major North American, European and Asian

    institutional investors that are adopting these principles designed to

    integrate responsible investment values into their decision-making and

    asset-ownership processes.

     "For the entire financial community, socially responsible investment goes hand in hand with the pursuit of sustainable economic development. The Caisse already adopted its own rules for socially responsible investment in 2005. This policy reflects the Caisse's desire to ensure that its investee companies behave as good corporate citizens in all areas where they operate," stated Caisse President and Chief Executive Officer Henri-Paul Rousseau.

     "By bringing together major institutions that endorse these principles, the UN is increasing the overall scope of what these institutions can do individually," added Mr. Rousseau, who signed the declaration of Principles for Responsible Investment in the presence of UN Secretary General Kofi Annan.

     The Caisse's policy on socially responsible investment can be consulted at: www.lacaisse.com

     The UN's Principles for Responsible Investment are available at:

    www.unpri.org/

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Terra Actualidad: Annan lanza en Wall Street Principios de la Inversión Responsable 27.4.2006

    El secretario general de la ONU, Kofi Annan, tocó hoy la campana de apertura de la Bolsa de Valores de Nueva York con una invitación al mundo de las finanzas a adherirse a los 'Principios para la Inversión Responsable'.

    Estos principios se contemplan en una nueva propuesta diseñada por el proyecto Global Compact y la Iniciativa de Finanzas del Programa de la ONU para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) con el propósito de proveer un marco para integrar aspectos sociales y medioambientales en la toma de decisiones en el área de las inversiones.

    'Hoy en día, cada vez está más claro que los objetivos de la ONU -la paz, la seguridad y el desarrollo- van de la mano con la prosperidad y el crecimiento de los mercados. Si las sociedades fallan, los mercados fallan', dijo Annan en la apertura de la jornada bursátil de Nueva York.

    Recordó que el proyecto Global Compact, lanzado por la ONU en el 2000, ya cuenta con casi 3.000 empresas privadas participantes, mientras que más de 160 entidades bancarias, aseguradoras y fondos de inversión están involucrados en la Iniciativa de Finanzas del PNUMA.

    'Existe un serio déficit. Hay una desconexión entre la responsabilidad empresarial, como imperativo en la gestión, y el actual comportamiento de los mercados financieros, que se mueven básicamente por consideraciones a corto plazo en detrimento de los objetivos a largo plazo', resaltó.

    Annan subrayó que, pese a algunas excepciones, la comunidad financiera todavía no ha reconocido suficientemente las iniciativas empresariales que se están llevando a cabo en el

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    aspecto del medio ambiente, los derechos laborales y los derechos humanos.

    De este modo, indicó que estos principios permitirán ofrecer 'una guía para conseguir una mayor rentabilidad en las inversiones a largo plazo y mercados más sostenibles'.

    Recordó que las instituciones inversoras de todo el mundo, desde EEUU, Europa, Latinoamérica y Asia, colectivamente mueven dos billones de dólares en activos.

    Con la adhesión a estos principios, agregó, las instituciones inversoras demostrarán su apoyo a las compañías y las alentarán a que se comprometan en los principios de la responsabilidad social y la sustentabilidad.

    Annan aprovechó la ocasión también para anunciar que el Fondo de Pensiones de los Empleados de la ONU, con casi 30.000 millones de dólares en activos se ha unido también a estos principios.

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Business Wire:UN Launches 'Principles For Responsible Investment'

    27.4.2006

    [also on Netherlands Corporate News, Asia Pulse, ...]

    International Funds Worth $2 Trillion Announce Endorsement at New York Stock Exchange

    In a historic development for global financial markets, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan was today joined by a group of the world's largest institutional investors at the international launch of the Principles for Responsible Investment.

    The heads of leading institutions from 16 countries, representing more than $2 trillion in assets owned, officially signed the Principles at a special launch event at the New York Stock Exchange. The Principles were developed during a nearly year-long process convened by the UN Secretary-General and coordinated by the UN Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI) and the UN Global Compact.

    "These Principles grew out of the understanding that while finance fuels the global economy, investment decision-making does not sufficiently reflect environmental, social and corporate governance considerations - or put another way, the tenets of sustainable development," the Secretary-General said.

    He added: "Developed by leading institutional investors, the Principles provide a framework for achieving better long-term investment returns and more sustainable markets. I invite institutional investors and their financial partners everywhere to adopt these Principles."

    In joining with institutional investors to develop the Principles, the United Nations collaborated with some of the world's most influential institutions - many of them public pension funds - involved in investment activities worldwide. It is estimated that pension funds alone - public and private - account for up to 35 percent of total global investment.

    More than 20 pension funds, foundations and special government funds, backed by a group of 70 experts from around the world, held meetings in Paris, New York, Toronto, London, and

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Boston over an eight-month period to craft the Principles.

    "We are proud to endorse the Principles, which recognize that social and environmental issues can be material to the financial outlook of a company and therefore to the value of our shares in that company," said Denise Nappier, Treasurer of the State of Connecticut, who is the principal fiduciary of $23 billion in pension fund assets.

    "Financial markets tend to focus too heavily on short-term results at the expense of long-term and non-traditional financial fitness factors that could affect a company's bottom line. For many institutional investors it is the long-term that matters and in this context environmental, social and governance issues take on new meaning."

    The six overarching Principles, which are voluntary, are underpinned by a set of 35 possible actions that institutional investors can take to integrate environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) considerations into their investment activities. These actions relate to a variety of issues, including investment decision-making, active ownership, transparency, collaboration and gaining wider support for these practices from the whole financial services industry.

    "We manage assets for future generations and acknowledge the link between long-term return and the governance of companies, markets and economies," said Knut N. Kjaer, Executive Director of the Norwegian Government Pension Fund, which holds assets of more than $250 billion. "We engaged in developing these Principles to help broaden the understanding of what drives long-term fund performance. Investors must collaborate to support well-regulated markets and sustainable development," Kjaer said.

Editor's Note:

    While access to the event is restricted, a live webcast of the Secretary-General's remarks, the signing ceremony and the subsequent panel discussion will be available from 9:45am to 11am EDT on 27 April at http://www.nyse.com/events/1145959807704.html

    The full text of the Principles for Responsible Investment, as well as an updated list of asset owner signatories is available on http://www.unpri.org.

    Additional resources from the event, including high resolution photographs, video coverage, additional quotes from investor signatories will also be available on http://www.unpri.org/.

About the Organisations:

UN Global Compact

    Launched by United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan in 2000, the UN Global Compact brings business together with UN agencies, labor, civil society and governments to advance ten universal principles in the areas of human rights, labor, environment and anti-corruption. Through the power of collective action, the Global Compact seeks to mainstream these ten principles in business activities around the world and to catalyze actions in support of broader UN goals. With over 2500 participating companies from more than 90 countries, it is the world's largest voluntary corporate citizenship initiative. For more information, please visit www.unglobalcompact.org.

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UNEP Finance Initiative

    The United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI) is a unique global partnership between UNEP and the financial services sector. UNEP FI works with 160 financial institutions - banks, insurers, asset managers, and pension funds - to develop and promote linkages between sustainability and financial performance. UNEP FI is the oldest and largest partnership between the UN and the global financial sector. UNEP FI promotes the adoption of best environmental and sustainability practice at all levels of financial institution operations. For more information on UNEP FI, see: http://www.unepfi.org

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Global Investor (UK): Pension funds sign ESG pact

    By Claire Milhench

    27.4.2006

    Responsible investing moved a little further up the agenda today with the signing of a pact by 32 pension funds to put environmental, social and governance standards (ESG) at the core of their investment strategies.

    The funds, worth some US$2 trillion, include the BT pension scheme, ABP, the Norwegian Government Pension Fund and the Government Employees Fund of South Africa. They signed up to the UN's Principles for Responsible Investment at a special launch at the NYSE. The Principles were developed over a year-long process convened by the UN Secretary-General and co-ordinated by the UN Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI) and the UN Global Compact. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said: "These Principles grew out of the understanding that while finance fuels the global economy, investment decision-making does not sufficiently reflect environmental, social and corporate governance considerations - or put another way, the tenets of sustainable development."

    Developed by leading institutional investors, the Principles are intended to provide a framework for achieving better long-term investment returns and more sustainable markets. More than 20 pension funds, foundations and special government funds, backed by a group of 70 experts from around the world, held meetings in Paris, New York, Toronto, London, and Boston over an eight-month period to craft the Principles. It is estimated that pension funds alone account for up to 35% of total global investment.

    Denise Nappier, Treasurer of the State of Connecticut, which is the principal fiduciary of $23 billion in pension fund assets, said she was proud to endorse the Principles, which recognised that social and environmental issues could be material to the financial outlook of a company. "Financial markets tend to focus too heavily on short-term results at the expense of long-term and non-traditional financial fitness factors that could affect a company's bottom line," she said. "For many institutional investors it is the long-term that matters and in this context environmental, social and governance issues take on new meaning."

    The six overarching Principles, which are voluntary, are underpinned by a set of 35 possible actions that institutional investors can take to integrate environmental, social and corporate governance considerations into their investment activities. These actions relate to a variety of issues, including investment decision-making, active ownership, transparency, collaboration and gaining wider support for these practices from the whole financial services industry. "We manage assets for future generations and acknowledge the link between long-term return and the governance of companies, markets and economies," said Knut Kjaer, executive director of the Norwegian Government Pension Fund, which holds assets of more than $250 billion. "We engaged in developing these Principles to help broaden the understanding of what drives

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    long-term fund performance. Investors must collaborate to support well-regulated markets and sustainable development."

    Sir Tim Chessells, chairman of the BT Pension Scheme, added: "This is an important, pragmatic initiative which should have a significant impact over time on international investment principles and practice. Our principal fund manager, Hermes has been a pioneer over many years in corporate governance and responsible investment."

    _____________________________________________________________________________ Xinhua L'ONU marque le 20e anniversaire de la catastrophe nucléaire de Tchernobyl

27.4.2006

    NEW YORK (Nations unies), 26 avril (XINHUA) -- Le secrétaire général de l'ONU et les agences de cette organisation ont marqué mercredi le 20e anniversaire de la catastrophe de Tchernobyl, qui a fait de nombreuses victimes en Ukraine et en Europe, alors que ses répercussions finales alourdiront encore ce bilan, selon des informations disponibles au siÃ?ge de l'ONU.

     "Il y a vingt ans, dans la nuit du 25 au 26 avril 1986, le réacteur numéro 4 de la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl explosait en causant l'accident nucélaire le plus terrible de l' Histoire", rappelle le Programme des Nations unies pour l' environnement (PNUE), dans un communiqué publié mercredi à Nairobi.

     "Aujourd'hui encore, non seulement l'Ukraine et les pays avoisinant - Belarus et Fédération de Russie - mais une bonne partie de l'Europe du nord, continuent de lutter contre les difficultés sociales, économiques, humanitaires et environnementales résultant de cette catastrophe" affirme le PNUE dans le document.

    Quant au Fonds des Nations unies pour l'enfance (Unicef), il relÃ?ve dans un communiqué que "des centaines de milliers de personnes ont dÃ? être déplacées ... et beaucoup travaillant sans la moindre protection ont sacrifié leur santé pour contenir et sceller le réacteur endommagé", fait remarquer l'Unicef.

     De son cÃ?té, l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) a publié mardi dernier un nouveau bilan de la catastrophe. Selon le dernier rapport de l'OMS, 5.000 cas de cancers de la thyroÃ?de ont été diagnostiqués et 4.000 autres cas pourraient être diagnostiqués dans les prochaines années.

    _____________________________________________________________________________ Actualites News Environnement: Tchernobyl la catastrophe nucléaire vue par les Nations Unies

     27 avril 2006 - 08:00

    Tchernobyl - Catastrophe nucléaire de Tchernobyl, les Nations Unies ont marqué le 20e anniversaire de la catastrophe nucléaire. Le Secrétaire général de l'ONU et les agences des Nations Unies ont marqué hier le 20e anniversaire de la catastrophe de Tchernobyl, la plus grande catastrophe nucléaire civile de l'Histoire, qui a fait au moins 5.000 morts en Ukraine et en Europe, alors que ses répercussions finales alourdiront encore ce bilan. ? Il y a vingt ans, dans la nuit du 25 au 26 avril 1986, le réacteur numéro 4 de la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl explosait en causant l'accident nucléaire le plus terrible de l'Histoire. ?,

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    rappelle le Programme des Nations Unies pour l'environnement (PNUE), dans un communiqué publié hier à Nairobi.

    ? Aujourd'hui encore, non seulement l'Ukraine et les pays avoisinant - Belarus et Fédération de Russie - mais une bonne partie de l'Europe du nord, continuent de lutter contre les difficultés sociales, économiques, humanitaires et environnementales résultant de cette catastrophe ?, ajoute le Programme des Nations Unies pour l'environnement (PNUE).

    ? Un territoire équivalent à la surface de l'Allemagne a été bombardé de radiations suite à l'explosion et à l'incendie ? de la centrale nucléaire de Tchernobyl, rapporte le Fonds des Nations Unies pour l'enfance (UNICEF) dans un communiqué publié hier à Tchernobyl. ? Des centaines de milliers de personnes ont dû être déplacées et près de 600.000 ‗liquidateurs',

    beaucoup travaillant sans la moindre protection, ont sacrifié leur santé pour contenir et sceller le réacteur endommagé ?, se souvient encore l'UNICEF.

    ? Nous devons nous souvenir de l'héroïsme désintéressé du personnel de secours qui a fait face à l'accident, des souffrances des plus de 330.000 personnes qui ont été évacuées des zones contaminées ?, a souligné le Secrétaire général dans une déclaration transmise hier par son porte-parole.

    ? Beaucoup de dures leçons doivent être retenues de Tchernobyl, y compris l'importance de fournir au public, lorsque surgit une catastrophe, une information transparente, en temps voulu et crédible ?, a fait observer Kofi Annan.

    Dans l'ex-Union Soviétique, toutes les informations sur la catastrophe sont restées pendant des années un secret d'Etat. Aujourd'hui la bataille des chiffres continue.

    L'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) a publié mardi dernier un nouveau bilan de la catastrophe. Selon le dernier rapport de l'OMS, 5.000 cas de cancers de la thyroïde ont été diagnostiqués et 4.000 autres cas pourraient être diagnostiqués dans les prochaines années. En septembre 2005, le Forum Tchernobyl - qui regroupe plusieurs agences des Nations Unies et des scientifiques du monde entier publiait un rapport intitulé ? Tchernobyl : la véritable

    ampleur de l'accident ?. ? Jusqu'à 4 000 personnes au total pourraient à terme décéder des suites d'une radio-exposition consécutive à […] Tchernobyl ?, concluait le rapport.

    Le Centre international de recherche sur le cancer (CIRC) estime à 16.000 le nombre de morts par cancers attribués à Tchernobyl. Le rapport TORCH (The Other report on Tchernobyl) estime que le chiffre se situerait entre 30.000 et 60.000. Greenpeace parle de 93.000 morts. ? Il y a plus de 4.000 cas de cancer de la thyroïde chez les enfants de la ‗Génération Tchernobyl'.

    Mais le cancer est seulement la partie émergée de l'iceberg. Les carences en iode, très courantes dans les environs de Tchernobyl et d'autres parties de la Biélorussie, de la Fédération Russe et de l'Ukraine font courir à toute une génération d'enfants le risque de développer des lésions cérébrales ?, affirme l'UNICEF dans son communiqué d'aujourd'hui.

    ? Au-delà des sauveteurs qui sont morts, ce sont des milliers d'enfants qui ont développé un cancer de la thyroïde, et des milliers d'autres individus pourraient mourraient mourir d'autres cancers du fait des radiations ?, a affirmé Mohammed El-Baradei, directeur de l'Agence internationale pour l'énergie atomique (AIEA), dans une déclaration publiée aujourd'hui.

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    ? Les explosions qui ont détruit l'unité 4 du réacteur central et qui ont déchargé leurs contenus dans un nuage radioactif, font clairement comprendre que les risques associés au nucléaire […] vont au-delà des frontières d'un pays ?, a dit le directeur, appelant à une coopération internationale dans ce domaine.

    Le Programme des Nations Unies pour l'environnement (PNUE) collabore avec le Comité scientifique des Nations Unies pour l'étude des effets des rayonnements ionisants (UNSCEAR), basé à Vienne en Autriche et dont le travail consiste à fournir des outils pour mieux appréhender l'impact des conséquences de l'accident de Tchernobyl. Le Comité participe également aux travaux du Forum de Tchernobyl, organisé par les Nations Unies pour analyser les incidences des radiations sur la santé et redéfinir les stratégies pour s'attaquer aux effets à long terme. Le UNSCEAR évalue au niveau régional et mondial l'exposition des êtres humains aux radiations ionisantes et la contamination dérivant de l'activité des centrales nucléaires, des activités militaires, de l industrie et de la recherche, des processus de radiation naturelle, ainsi que des diagnostiques médicaux et des interventions thérapeutiques. Le Comité analyse également les progrès concernant les effets des maladies et des décès radio-induits. Les évaluations du Comite fournissent les bases scientifiques aux agences des Nations Unies chargées de formuler des recommandations sur les effets radiologiques et la radioprotection. ____________________________________________________________________________ L'Express (Mauritius): Alexander Alusa, Codirecteur Des Conventions

    Environnementales Du PNUE

    27.4.2006

―Les changements météorologiques pèsent sur l‘économie‖

    Le Programme des Nations unies pour l’environnement (PNUE) et l’Organisation

    mondiale de la météorologie (OMM) ont créé le GIEC en 1988. Pourquoi ?

    Avant le groupe d‘experts intergouvernemental sur l‘évolution du climat (GIEC), le PNUE avait un comité consultatif sur les gaz à effet de serre. Ce comité a découvert que ces gaz avaient un effet considérable sur le système climatique. Pour cette raison, le PNUE et l‘OMM ont décidé de mettre sur pied une organisation spécialisée dans l‘évaluation de la documentation et des

    implications des gaz à effet de serre. Quelques années plus tard, le premier rapport d‘évaluation du GIEC a démontré que des actions devaient être prises au niveau des gouvernements pour aborder le problème.

? De quelles façons les petits Etats insulaires en développement (PEID) sont-ils

    vulnérables aux changements climatiques ?

Une montée du niveau de la mer d‘un demi-mètre avec des changements dans la structure des

    vagues et du vent inondera les littoraux des PEID. Un risque majeur pour les petites îles, c‘est

    qu‘elles seront entièrement submergées. Nous n‘avons pas encore vu le pire et, à moins que nous arrivions à contrôler les hausses de température, il viendra. Une étude récente élaborée, ironiquement, par les Etats-Unis démontre que les vents centraux des cyclones tropicaux sont affectés par les changements climatiques. Il y a un risque que ces changements aient un impact sur les événements météorologiques extrêmes, telles les sécheresses et les inondations. L‘ouragan Katrina a marqué une grande prise de conscience.

    ? Le ministre mauricien de l’Environnement a demandé des études approfondies sur

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