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This course traces the recent sociocultural, political and

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This course traces the recent sociocultural, political and

     UNIVERSITY of NEW MEXICO

     DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

     FALL 2004

    COURSE: FLC 627 Conflict & Reconciliation

    SOC 101-627 Introduction to Sociology

    INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Christine Rack st Office: Sociology / Social Science Building (SSCI) 1floor

     Phone: 277-5714 / email rack@unm.edu

     Hours: Tues. & Thurs. 12:30 2pm

     or by appointment

    MEETS: Tues. & Thurs. 11:00 - 12:15

    WHERE: Hibben 125

    READINGS http://ereserves.unm.edu/default.asp Choose Sociology then SOC 101 (or search by “Rack”)

     Password: “lobo627

    CONTENT in the FLC SEMINAR COURSE

     This course is the “seminar” course in one of the Freshman Learning Communities (FLCs) offered

    as a choice to incoming freshmen at UNM. This course brings together Introduction to Sociology (SOC101) and Public Speaking (C&J130) under an overarching theme of Conflict & Reconciliation. To meet all these integrative tasks, this seminar course is reading intensive. The readings will provide the basic concepts in the discipline of Sociology, introduce students to ideas developed further in the interdisciplinary Peace Studies minor, and suggest themes that students will use for speaking assignments in Communications & Journalism.

     Sociology teaches us how our personal stories, and many of our conflicts, are shaped by our participation in the larger story of our society at this time. The two sociological texts used in this course give us the concepts and intellectual clarity useful in understanding and discussing this larger story. We will read and discuss them primarily on Tuesdays throughout the semester.

     Sociology naturally lends itself to the study of conflict, whether we are talking about families, communities, nations, or the world. Viewed sociologically, conflicts are inherent in the working out of social inequalities. Through the sociological lens of conflict theory, interpersonal, intergroup, structural and/or international conflicts are profoundly shaped by relative social power. This perspective rests on an assumption that people and groups act out of a sense of competition in order to win scarce resources.

    Flowing from this analysis, sociology analyses conflicts according to the divergent goals and differing levels of power to achieve them.

     Peace Studies, on the other hand, rests on the assumption that people work cooperatively to

    develop resources, and that this cooperative capacity is itself a valuable resource. Flowing from this assumption, peacemakers have developed various theories and practices to encourage and support this cooperative, alternative power. “Conflict resolution” or “conflict management” refers to a set of

    communication strategies used to end the active phase of a fight. These strategies, including mediation, negotiation, arbitration, diplomacy and the law, rely on cooperative inclinations in human society. We will be reading ideas from this perspective primarily on Thursdays.

     “Reconcilation” refers to a large number of activities that help turn the temporary peace of an agreement achieved by any of the above strategies, into a lasting end to the conflict itself. Through reconciliation and the related processes of restorative and/or transitional justice, parties to the dispute explore and overcome the pain brought on during the conflict and find ways to build trust and live cooperatively with each other. The final textbook for this course explores the various ways that individuals, groups, and nations have attempted to heal the damage resulting from conflicts and acts of violence. Along the way, Ellis Cose seeks to clarify who, when, why, and under what circumstances, people are able to truly reconcile with past enemies and hurts.

    OBJECTIVES

    ; RECOGNITION AND UTILIZATION OF BASIC SOCIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS

     Because this course is a prerequisite for other sociology courses, students will learn to see and use some of the tools used by sociologists. Students will be able to evaluate sociology as a possible field for their major and experience the many ways that sociological insight can enrich any people-oriented career --and our personal and collective lives.

    AWARENESS OF CONFLICT DYMANICS AND ABILITY TO UTILIZE PEACEMAKING TOOLS

     Beginning with self-awareness, students will develop an understanding of conflict dynamics that they experience in their personal relationships and see in the world. We will explore the issues facing the parties to a dispute, and the consciousness that enables resolution and reconciliation. Students will learn some of the tools used by peacemakers to manage conflicts and evoke a spirit of cooperation.

    DEVELOPMENT OF KNOWLEDGE AND ARTICULATION IN PEACE STUDIES

     This course will introduce students to the field of peace studies, allowing them to consider the field for their minor. Students will be introduced to a vocabulary to describe the relationship between peace and justice, and some ideas about how the two come together or don’t. In more depth, students will explore the issue of

    reconciliation, developing an ability to articulate this in the Public Speaking portion of the course. DEVELOP SKILLS IN TEAM AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING

     Students and teachers will have an opportunity to interact as members of a learning community. In this style of pedagogy, students have greater rights and responsibilities to and for their own learning, as well as greater responsibility for other students. Students will acquire a sense of their own capacities and preferences for this learning environment.

    REQUIREMENTS:

    1. READ & REPORT (30%): Reading ahead means that we can more intelligently discuss the material in class.

    Therefore, read the assigned material BEFORE the class during which it is scheduled for discussion on the

    Course Calendar. Although all students are expected to read the materials before the class, one third

    (according to Reading Groups A, B, and C) of the students will be assigned the task of analyzing and thinking

    more deeply about the readings in a Reading Report. Each student will complete eight of the 24 Reading

    Reports scheduled in the calendar using the forms (single, primary with secondary, or multiple) provided in the

    “course materials” folder on e-reserves. You need not type these reports unless your handwriting is illegible.

    No Reading Reports will be accepted after the class meeting during which the material was discussed.

    Students may miss one report without losing any credit. That is, 100% of Reading Reports would be a total of

    seven. However, students may do all eight reports and this will constitute the only extra credit in this course.

    All reports will be marked “G” (Good), “OK” (Adequate) or “I” (Incomplete, Inaccurate or Insulting). Students

    who must miss a class may turn in the Reading Report at the Sociology office before the class period or send

    it by email. However, any reading reports submitted by email must be confirmed with a hardcopy at the next

    class meeting.

    2. ATTEND, PARTICIPATE, RESPOND (30%): Attendance is required and will be reflected in the attendance

    portion of your grade. The reason for missing class will not affect the grading, that is, I will not discriminate

    between classes missed for a “good” reason from “mental health” absences. Students should attend class

    whether or not they have completed the Reading Report for that class. Participation is assessed by reading

    group activity and individual contributions to the class. A final reflection paper on the theme of reconciliation is

    required on or before November 30. A suggested but not required format for this paper will be provided. This

    paper will be graded according to clarity and honesty of effort.

    3. MIDTERM & FINAL EXAM (30%): These tests will assess students’ recognition and analytic grasp of the core

    concepts in sociology. The format will be objective (multiple choice, matching, true/false, short answer) and

    focused on the sociology textbooks by McGuire. The final will not be cumulative.

    4. LIBRARY & SPEAKING PAPER (10%): Students will complete the on-line library tutorial before the class

    scheduled to go to the library in the first month of classes. This library work will give students the necessary

    research tools for the final speaking assignment. At the end of the semester, students will write a paper

    corresponding with, but not identical to, the final speaking assignment. The paper should be 5-8 typed pages,

    reflect your library skills, and have proper references. I will be available to help with appropriate referencing if

    necessary.

    5. SPECIAL SERVICES: Any student who, because of a disability, may require some special arrangements in

    order to meet course requirements should contact the instructor as soon as possible to make necessary

    accommodations. It is the responsibility of the student to request accommodation for individual learning needs.

    UNM will make every attempt to accommodate all qualified students with disabilities. For further information,

    contact Student Support Services at (505) 277-3506.

REQUIRED TEXTS & READINGS

    McIntyre, Lisa J. (2002). The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology. Boston: McGraw Hill (second edition).

    McIntyre, Lisa J. (Ed.) (2002). The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology. Boston: McGraw Hill (second edition).

    Cose, Ellis (2004). Bone to Pick: Of Forgiveness, Reconciliation, Reparation, & Revenge. New York: Atrias Books. Additional required readings are available on e-reserves through University Libraries (Zimmerman).

    “MCS” and page number refers to Schrock-Shenk, Carolyn (Ed.) (2000). Mediation and Facilitation

    Training Manual: Foundations and Skills for Constructive Conflict Transformation. Akron PA:

    Mennonite Conciliation Services

    ASSESSMENT

     30% Reading Reports (based on 7)

     30% Midterm & Final

     20% Attendance & Participation

     10% Reflection on Reconciliation

     10% Speaking Paper

    SOC 101-627: Conflict & Reconciliation FALL 2004

     THEME TUESDAY THURSDAY

    KEPTICISM, UG 24 UG 26 RR#1-A SAA1 CYNICISM, INTRO/ CONFLICT & RECONCILIATION COSE INTRO; MCS PP 32-37; “REAL HEROISM;”

    HEROISM MCINTYRE CH2 (FOCUS ON SOCIAL) “RECONCILIATION

    EDIA & UG 31 RR#1-B EPT 2 RR#1-C MAS2 PROPAGANDA CH 3 (FUZZY OBJECT) COSE CH 1 (FORGIVENESS); MCS PP 43-47, “PROBLEM OF

    CH 4 (INCONVENIENT FACTS, SKEPTICISM) NEUTRALITY “APOLOGY

    THICS, EPT 7 RR#2-A EPT 9 DOUBLE STYLES RR#2-B ESS3 FAIRNESS CH. 5-6 (RESEARCH); READER #6 MCS 51-71

    BJECTIVITY, SEPT 14 CULTURE & CONFLICT SEPT 16 RR#2-C TOPIC CHOICE; LIBRARY TUTORIAL DUE O4 MODERNITY STUDENT SPEAK ON STYLES/ DOUBLE CH 7 CULTURE PP 94-102; MCS PP 101-106

    NDIV / COLLECT EPT 21 DOUBLE RR#3-A LIBRARY EPT 23 DOUBLE/SGID RR#3-B ISS5 CULTURAL ID CH 7 CULTURE PP 103-END; READER #10,12 MCS PP 110-114; 120-122; 125-126; 146; READER #23

    HIERARCHY, SEPT 28 RR#3-C SEPT 30 RR#4-A 6 AUTHORITY CH. 8 SOCIAL STRUCTURE; READER #14, 16 MCS PP 80-90; READER #19, 20

    AMILY VIOLENCE OCT 5 RR#4-B CT 7 RR#4-C FO7 CH. 9 SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS; READER # 2, 22 MCS PP 72-79; “FAMILY;” READER # 4

    OCT 12 CT 14 O8 MIDTERM FALL BREAK

    GENOCIDE OCT 19 RR#5-A OCT 21 DOUBLE -MOVIE RR#5-B 9 CH 10 SOCIALIZATION COSE CH. 2 (UNFORGIVABLE); “RWANDA TODAY

    BEDIENCE & CT 26 RR#5-C CT 28 RR#6-A (MILITARY INSTITUTIONS) OOO10 CRREBELLION H 11 DEVIANCE; READER #26, 28; “GROUP THINK EADER #7, 15, 24; “THE PRICE OF VALOR

    EATH PENALTY, OV 2 RR#6-B OV 4 RR#6-C DNN11 LEGAL INEQUITY CH. 12 INEQUALITY; MCS PP 115-118; READER #32 COSE CH. 3 (REVENGE); READER #25, 31 “LAW &

    JUSTICE

    OCIAL OV 9 RR#7-A OV 11 RR#7-B SNN12 COHESION CH 13 CLASS; READER #34, 35 COSE CH. 4 (RECONCILIATION); MCS PP 94-96; “MEETING

    OCIAL OV 16 RR#7-C OV 18 RR#8-A SNN13 CONSTRUCTION CH. 14 RACE-ETHNICITY; READER #36 COSE CH. 5 (REPARATIONS)

    MPATHY NOV 23 RR#8-B OV 25 EN14 CH 14 GENDER; READER #29, 38 THANKSGIVING

    RUTH EC 2 DOUBLE “TDNOV 30 RR#8-C REFLECTION PAPER DUE 15 PRESENTATIONS COSE CH. 6 (MEMORY & TRUTH)

    EC 7 DOUBLE EC 9 DOUBLE DD16 PRESENTATIONS PRESENTATIONS

    EC 14 10AM-NOON D 17 FINAL EXAM

    “CH --- [FOCAL POINT] = MCINTYRE TEXT = MENNONITE CONCILIATION SERVICE (ON E-RESERVES) “MCS”

    READER # = ARTICLES IN MCGUIRE (EDITOR) -------- = SPECIFIC ARTICLES AND LINKS (ON E-RESERVES) BY TITLE

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