DOCX

THE LIMITS OF FREE SPEECH IN SCHOOLS

By Marion Hill,2014-07-08 11:00
14 views 0
22 MAR 2012 – THE LIMITS OF FREE SPEECH IN SCHOOLS. [TYPE THE ABSTRACT OF THE DOCUMENT HERE. THE ABSTRACT IS TYPICALLY A SHORT SUMMARY OF THE CONTENTS OF THE ...

Student’s Last Name 1

    Sollars2

    Xander Sollars

    Mrs. Wilson

    US History

    8 July 2012

    The Limits of Free Speech in Schools

    Limits of Free Speech

    in Schools

    “Free Speech is guaranteed on one owns property”

    (Farish, Leah, “The First Amendment Freedom of

    Speech, Religion, and the Press) Freedom of speech,

    for many years has been a problem for schools. There has http://www.believeallthings.com/1355/def

    amation-religions-resolutions/ been protests punished, sexual innuendo used in speeches

    violating school conduct, and schools punishing people outside of campus. Even though speech is a huge issue in schools due to court limits, free speech should be limited because individual speech can be harming to the common good if left unchecked and common good can be harmful to the people if it’s too limited.

    “Congress shall make no law… abridging the freedom of speech…” (The First

    Amendment) The first thing on the agenda is Tinker v. Des Moines, December 1965, John and Mary Beth Tinker decided to wear black armbands to school to protest the Vietnam War. Des Moines School District in Des Moines, Iowa, learned of their protest and banned them. When the Tinkers walked in the classroom their teacher told them to take them off. They refused and were suspended. Court then learned of them being suspended and wondered if the school violated their

    Sollars3

    st1 amendment rights. From there they found out that the school harmed it by limiting their speech too much. The Tinkers finally won.

    Sometimes though there are times when speech is not protected. 1986, Matthew

    Fraser is getting ready to read his speech in front of his peers. Earlier his teacher told him to not to read it due to sexual content. Rather than listening to the teacher, he read it anyways. When he was done, the school suspended him and told him he couldn’t speak at the moving up ceremony. After words he sued the school because he believed his rights were being violated. Soon it got to the point where the Supreme Court got involved. Saying how Fraser hurt the common good his

    speech was limited to that matter and he broke it. So Court

    ruled that the school did the right thing in limiting it.

    “Speech isn’t given its protected” Sometimes

    there will be cases left unanswered by court like Morse v.

    Fredrick. On a normal day, Joseph Fredrickson and some of

    his friends were given permission to go watch the Olympic

    torch pass. He had a banner that said “Bong Hits 4 Jesus”.

    http://www.aleph0.com/~chjones/blogentries/wackyThe school, after he got back, suspended him and -news/

    confiscated the banner. Although most believe he was

    protected by first amendment right, he was violating law by supporting illegal drug use, thus he lost.

    Sollars4

    Free Speech in schools has been a hard topic for Court, having to determine whether or not a student was protected by the First Amendment. Like in Tinker v. Des Moines, the

    speech was too limited, with Bethel v. Fraser, Fraser believed his right were too limited when in fact they weren’t limited, finally with Mores v. Frederick, it was left unanswered. So please, support freedom of speech in schools, your choice could affect what happens to your kids in their schools.

    Sollars5

    Bibliography

    “Pure Speech” Legal Definition web 03 Mar. 2012.http://researchlawyers.com/glossary/pure-speech.html

    Farish, Leah. The First Amendment Freedom of Speech, Religion, and the Press. Spring Field, NJ

    Enslow, 1998. Print

    “Bill of Rights Instititute: Landmark Supreme Court Cases: Tinker v. Des Moines (1969)” Bill of Rights Institute: Home. Web 12. Feb 2012 http://billofrightsinstitute.org/resources/educator-resources/lessons-plans/landmark-cases-and-the-constitution/tinker-v-des-moines-1969

    Hudson, David L “First Amendment Center” K-12 Public School Student Expression

    http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/k-12-public-Overview 28 Sept 2012 Web. 03 Mar 2012

    school-student-expressionoverview

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com