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The non-electric pitchpipe (C-C) that women use has notes within

By Ricky Stevens,2014-05-02 18:44
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The non-electric pitchpipe (C-C) that women use has notes within

    Finding Your Part’s Starting Note when the Pitchpipe is Blown

    The women’s non-electric pitchpipe (C-C) has notes between Middle C and High C (see chart: Keyboard

    Names).. An electric pitchpipe could have a “wider range” (more notes that it can be heard) - but most often

    the notes between Middle C and High C are the ones used for women’s arrangements.

    If you were playing notes on a piano, here are the names of the notes -- and showing you the pitchpipe range

    in relationship to the piano notes and the range for women’s voices.

    Keyboard Names:

    Possible Range for Women’s Voices

    Pitchpipe Range

    A# / B flat

    B Low C We know that it is not practical for one pitchpipe to blow every part’s first note… so as an alternative, a single C# / B flat note is blown (which is usually the key of the song) and each part has to learn where their first note is in D relationship to the pitch that is blown. It is not important for our singers (except for the pitchpipe blowers) to

    D# / E flat know “what the pitch is” -- but instead we must concentration on where our starting notes are from that PITCH.

    E

    Rule 1: The note blown is the PITCH (we don’t care what its keyboard name is) - but we do care where F

    our first note is in relationship to the PITCH. F# / G flat G Music is mathematical in nature, G# / A flat ; Basic relationships between notes are consistent. Sing the start of “Row Row Row Your Boat.” For this A song, no matter where you start the song, you are starting on the PITCH (see next chart) and singing the A# / B flat equivalent of 1-1-1-2-3

    B ; Regardless of our part, our most common first notes are one of these: 1, 3rd, 5th, or Octave

    Middle C (could be high or low)

    C# / B flat < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < UP > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >

    D

    D# / E flat SOME FAMILIAR HINTS: E 7th F Octave - “You are my lucky star” Low 1 F# / G flat G

    Down 8 up 1 2nd G# / A flat

     A

     3rd A# / B flat

     4th B

     High C

    C# / B flat “Born Free 5th

    D

    D# / E flat “O-oh, say can you see” 6th

    E

    F “Fly me to the Moon” 7th

    F# / G flat PITCH (1) G G# / A flat Sound of Music “Do - Re - Me” 2nd A A# / B flat Are you Sleeping 3rd B “Here Comes the Bride” 4th

    Do - Me - So - Do 5th

    “My Bon-nie Lies Over the Ocean” 6th

    Up 8 down just a little (1/2) 7th

    Octave -“Some-where over the rainbow” High 1

     2nd

     3rd

     4th

     5th

     6th

    Guide to Chorus Songs:

    Bold indicates unusual note placement for the part from the pitch that is blown.

1) Songs that build on the PITCH:

    Pitch Blown Song Title/First Line Basses Baris Leads Tenor E flat I Love you Truly Down Octave Pitch Down to 5th Up to 3rd F Let Me Call You Sweetheart Down Octave Down to 5th Down to 3rd Pitch F You Can Have Every Light on Broadway Down Octave Down to 5th Pitch Up to 3rd F Runnin’ Wild Down to 5th Down to 5th Down to 5th Down to 5th F Love Medley Pitch Pitch Up to 3rd Up to 5th A flat I’m Sitting on Top of the World Down Octave Down to 5th Pitch Up to 3rd A flat Smile Medley Down Octave Down to 3rd Down to 5th Pitch G The Moment I saw My Thighs Down Octave Down to 5th Pitch Up to 3rd B flat Let There Be Peace (starting at chorus) Down Octave Down Octave Down Octave Down Octave E flat I Don’t Know Why Down Octave Pitch Down to 5th Up to 3rd

    2) Songs that start on a related chord to the PITCH:

    Pitch Blown Song Title/First Line Basses Baris Leads Tenor F Happy Birthday Down 8 +up 1 Down 1/2 Born Free Up to 4th

    (down to 5th) C Irish Blessing Down to 5th Up to 5th Up to 3rd Up 8 down 1 B flat How we Sang Today Down 8 + up 1 Down to 4th Down to 5th Down 1

3) Some songs are written in a minor key (sad sound):

    Pitch Blown Song Title/First Line Basses Baris Leads Tenor D Sample Pitch Up to 3m** Up to 5th Up Octave

     ** think up the the 3rd and then drop 1/2 step into the 3m or “minor 3rd”

4) Some songs are just odd - and we have to learn what to do:

    Pitch Blown Song Title/First Line Basses Baris Leads Tenor G Sample Pitch Down to 6th Up to 3m Up to 5th

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