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Indiana State Standards covered - The Natural Heritage of Indiana

By Anita Duncan,2014-05-02 06:36
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Indiana State Standards covered - The Natural Heritage of IndianaThe,the,THE

    ththWater Resources and the Role of the Independent Sector - This unit for 6-8 graders will direct

    students to study the issues of the amount of water per person, distribution of the water in relation to our ever increasing population and the quality of the water at our disposal and to understand the role government(s), business and industry, the independent and family sectors play in preserving our water resources. Indiana State Standards covered ?

    Learning to Give through Save the Earth Now

    Indiana‚Äôs Academic Standards

    Social Studies

    6.2.6. Roles of Citizens: Define citizenship and roles of citizens in selected nation-states of

    Europe and the Americas, and make comparisons to the United States of America. 6.4.6. Explain how financial institutions (banks, credit unions, stocks-and-bonds markets)

    channel funds from savers to borrowers and investors.

    7.3.15. Environment and Society: Use a variety of information resources to identify current

    issues related to natural resources in selected countries in Africa, Asia, and the Southwest

    Pacific, and examine contrasting perspectives on these issues.

    8.2.3. Foundations of Government: Identify and explain the relationship between rights and

    responsibilities of citizenship in the United States.

    8.2.4. Foundations of Government: Define and explain the importance of individual and civic

    responsibilities.

    8.4.10. Examine the importance of borrowing and lending (the use of credit) in the United States,

    and list the advantages and disadvantages of using credit.

    Language Arts

    6.4.2. Organization and Focus: Choose the form of writing that best suits the intended purpose. 6.4.3. Organization and Focus: Write informational pieces of several paragraphs that: engage

    the interest of the reader; state a clear purpose; develop the topic with supporting details

    and precise language; conclude with a detailed summary linked to the purpose of the

    composition.

    6.4.5. Research Process and Technology: Use note-taking skills when completing research for

    writing.

    6.4.6. Research Process and Technology: Use organizational features of electronic text (on

    computers), such as bulletin boards, databases, keyword searches, and e-mail addresses,

    to locate information.

    6.5.3. Research Application: Write or deliver a research report that has been developed using a

    systematic research process (defines the topic, gathers information, determines credibility,

    reports findings) and that: uses information from a variety of sources (books, technology,

    multimedia) and documents sources independently by using a consistent format for

    citations; demonstrates that information that has been gathered has been summarized;

    demonstrates that sources have been evaluated for accuracy, bias, and credibility;

    organizes information by categorizing and sequencing, and demonstrates the distinction

    between one's own ideas from the ideas of others, and includes a bibliography (Works

    Cited).

    6.5.5. Writing Processes and Features: Write persuasive compositions that: state a clear

    position on a proposition or proposal; support the position with organized and relevant

    evidence and effective emotional appeals; anticipate and address reader concerns and

    counterarguments.

    6.5.7. Writing Processes and Features: Write for different purposes (information, persuasion,

    description) and to a specific audience or person, adjusting tone and style as necessary. 7.4.3. Organization and Focus: Support all statements and claims with anecdotes (first-person

    accounts), descriptions, facts and statistics, and specific examples.

    7.4.5. Research Process and Technology: Identify topics; ask and evaluate questions; and

    develop ideas leading to inquiry, investigation, and research.

    7.5.4. Writing Processes and Features: Write persuasive compositions that: state a clear

    position or perspective in support of a proposition or proposal; describe the points in

    support of the proposition, employing well-articulated evidence and effective emotional

    appeals; anticipate and address reader concerns and counterarguments.

    7.5.3. Research Application: Write or deliver a research report that has been developed using a

    systematic research process (defines the topic, gathers information, determines credibility,

    reports findings) and that: uses information from a variety of sources (books, technology,

    multimedia) and documents sources independently by using a consistent format for

    citations; demonstrates that information that has been gathered has been summarized and

    that the topic has been refined through this process; demonstrates that sources have been

    evaluated for accuracy, bias, and credibility; organizes information by categorizing and

    sequencing, and demonstrates the distinction between one's own ideas from the ideas of

    others, and includes a bibliography (Works Cited).

    7.5.7. Writing Processes and Features: Write for different purposes and to a specific audience

    or person, adjusting style and tone as necessary.

    7.7.4. Arrange supporting details, reasons, descriptions, and examples effectively. 8.4.4. Research Process and Technology: Plan and conduct multiple-step information searches

    using computer networks.

    8.4.5. Research Process and Technology: Achieve an effective balance between researched

    information and original ideas.

    8.5.3. Research Application: Write or deliver a research report that has been developed using a

    systematic research process (defines the topic, gathers information, determines credibility,

    reports findings) and that: uses information from a variety of sources (books, technology,

    multimedia) and documents sources independently by using a consistent format for

    citations; demonstrates that information that has been gathered has been summarized and

    that the topic has been refined through this process; demonstrates that sources have been

    evaluated for accuracy, bias, and credibility; organizes information by categorizing and

    sequencing, and demonstrates the distinction between one's own ideas from the ideas of

    others, and includes a bibliography (Works Cited).

    8.5.4. Writing Processes and Features: Write persuasive compositions that: include a well-

    defined thesis that makes a clear and knowledgeable appeal; present detailed evidence,

    examples, and reasoning to support effective arguments and emotional appeals; provide

    details, reasons, and examples, arranging them effectively by anticipating and answering

    reader concerns and counterarguments.

    8.5.7. Writing Processes and Features: Write for different purposes and to a specific audience

    or person, adjusting tone and style as necessary.

Science

    6.1.6. The Scientific Enterprise: Explain that computers have become invaluable in science

    because they speed up and extend people's ability to collect, store, compile, and analyze

    data, prepare research reports, and share data and ideas with investigators all over the

    world.

    6.1.7. Technology and Science: Explain that technology is essential to science for such

    purposes as access to outer space and other remote locations, sample collection and

    treatment, measurement, data collection and storage, computation, and communication of

    information.

    6.2.5. Communication Skills: Organize information in simple tables and graphs and identify

    relationships they reveal. Use tables and graphs as examples of evidence for explanations

    when writing essays or writing about lab work, fieldwork, etc.

    6.3.8. The Earth and the Processes That Shape It: Explain that fresh water, limited in supply

    and uneven in distribution, is essential for life and also for most industrial processes.

    Understand that this resource can be depleted or polluted, making it unavailable or

    unsuitable for life.

    6.3.13. The Earth and the Processes That Shape It: Identify, explain, and discuss some effects

    human activities, such as the creation of pollution, have on weather and the atmosphere. 6.3.16. The Earth and the Processes That Shape It: Explain that human activities, such as

    reducing the amount of forest cover, increasing the amount and variety of chemicals

    released into the atmosphere, and intensive farming, have changed the capacity of the

    environment to support some life forms.

    6.4.8. Interdependence of Life and Evolution: Explain that in all environments, such as

    freshwater, marine, forest, desert, grassland, mountain, and others, organisms with

    similar needs may compete with one another for resources, including food, space, water,

    air, and shelter. In any environment, the growth and survival of organisms depend on the

    physical conditions.

    6.5.4. Shapes and Symbolic Relationships: Demonstrate how graphs may help to show patterns,

    such as trends, varying rates of change, gaps, or clusters, which can be used to make

    predictions.

    6.5.5. Reasoning and Uncertainty: Explain the strengths and weaknesses of using an analogy to

    help describe an event, object, etc.

    6.7.3. Constancy and Change: Identify examples of feedback mechanisms within systems that

    serve to keep changes within specified limits.

    7.1.4. Scientific Inquiry: Describe that different explanations can be given for the same

    evidence, and it is not always possible to tell which one is correct without further inquiry. 7.1.8. Technology and Science: Explain that technologies often have drawbacks as well as

    benefits. Consider a technology, such as the use of pesticides, which help some

    organisms but may hurt others, either deliberately or inadvertently.

    7.2.7. Communication Skills: Incorporate circle charts, bar and line graphs, diagrams, scatter

    plots, and symbols into writing, such as lab or research reports, to serve as evidence for

    claims and/or conclusions.

    7.4.9. Interdependence of Life and Evolution: Understand and explain that as any population of

    organisms grows, it is held in check by one or more environmental factors. These factors

    could result in depletion of food or nesting sites and/or increase loss to increased

    numbers of predators or parasites. Give examples of some consequences of this.

    8.1.1. The Scientific View of the World: Recognize that and describe how scientific knowledge

    is subject to modification as new information challenges prevailing theories and as a new

    theory leads to looking at old observations in a new way.

    8.1.2. The Scientific View of the World: Recognize and explain that some matters cannot be

    examined usefully in a scientific way.

    8.2.6. Communication: Write clear, step-by-step instructions (procedural summaries) for

    conducting investigations, operating something, or following a procedure. 8.2.7. Communication: Participate in group discussions on scientific topics by restating or

    summarizing accurately what others have said, asking for clarification or elaboration, and

    expressing alternative positions.

    8.3.6.The Earth and the Processes That Shape It: Understand and explain that the benefits of the

    Earth's resources, such as fresh water, air, soil, and trees, are finite and can be reduced by

    using them wastefully or by deliberately or accidentally destroying them. 8.5.6.Reasoning and Uncertainty: Explain that a single example can never prove that something

    is always true, but it could prove that something is not always true.

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