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AMMGP(AVIATION MAINTENANCE MANAGER'S GUIDE PROJECT)

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DISCLAIMER: THE AVIATION MAINTENANCE MANAGERS GUIDE IS INTENDED TO BE A TOOL FOR ALL RELATED MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES AND PERSONNEL. THIS GUIDE IN NO WAY IS TO ...

    AVIATION MAINTENANCE MANAGERS GUIDE

    FEB 2006

    Table of Contents

    Section 1 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………...2

    Section 2 Personnel……………………………………………………………………………...3

    Section 3 Maintenance Management……………………………………………………………9

    Section 4 Quality Assurance…………………………………………………………………...16

    Section 5 Deployment Logistics……………………………………………………………….23

    Section 6 Aircraft Receipt and Transfers………………………………………………………26

    Section 7 Aviation Maintenance Management………………………………………………...29

    Section 8 Maintenance Inspections…………………………………………………………….30

    Section 9 Cannibalization, Aircraft Preservation and Storage…………………………………32

    Section 10 Damaged Aircraft………………………………………………………………….33

    Section 11 Maintenance Department Safety…………………………………………………..35

    Section 12 Support Equipment………………………………………………………………...40

    Section 13 Supply……………………………………………………………………………...41

    Section 14 Aircraft Records and Reporting Systems……………………………………….….45

    Section 15 Special Programs and Other Areas of Interest……………………………………..47

    Useful Links……………………………………………………………………………………..52

    Alphabetical Index……………………………………………………………………………….54

    Section 1 - Introduction

    Back to Table of Contents

    Disclaimer: The Aviation Maintenance Managers Guide is intended to be a tool for all related Maintenance procedures and personnel. This guide in no way is to be used as an official maintenance publication. This guide is intended to serve as a quick reference to official directives.

    Updates: Changes to this document are welcome. The naval aviation community is welcome to submit changes to make the guide a useful tool for all aviation maintenance manager.

    Text highlighted in yellow are items that are in the process of being researched for current information (i.e., such as hard-to-find references).

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    Section 2 - Personnel

    Back to Table of Contents

    1. Personnel. The management of maintenance personnel is a prime responsibility of the Maintenance Officer. This management requires not only a constant awareness of established requirements relative to reporting of personnel matters, but also a working knowledge of the various programs available that, when properly applied, will enhance the effectiveness of the assigned personnel. The diagram below shows: The sequence of tasks by which the general mission gets translated into readiness, The transition from Manpower to

    Personnel, and The role of Manpower Requirements in the entire MPT process.

a. Allowances and Manning. Online references:

     http://web.nps.navy.mil/~kishore/mpt/Default.htm Navy Directives Online

     http://www.mccdc.usmc.mil/tfs Marine Corps Combat

     Development Center

     http://www.usmc.mil/directiv.nsf/web+orders Official USMC Website

     http://www.avtechtra.navy.mil/ NAVAIR Tech Training

     Homepage

     b. Orders, Directives and Manuals.

     OPNAVINST 1000.16J Manual of Navy Tools Force

     Manpower

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     MCO 5311.1C Total Force Structure Process (TFSP)

     MCO 5320.12E Precedence Levels For Manning and

     Staffing

     (1) Squadron Manpower Documents (SQMDs). Issued by the CNO (DCNO

    Manpower, Personnel and Training), the SQMD displays by individual billets the quantitative and qualitative manpower requirements of an individual aviation squadron or a class of squadrons and the rationale for the determination of manpower requirements. Requirements are predicated upon statements of Required Operational Capabilities (ROC) under a Projected Operational Environment (POE), aircraft configuration, specified operating profile, computer workload and established doctrinal constraints.

     (2) Ship Manpower Document (SMD). Issued by the CNO (DCNO Manpower,

    Personnel and Training), the SMD displays in detail quantitative and qualitative manpower requirements of an individual ship or class of ships and the rationale for determination of the requirements. Requirements are predicated upon a Required Operational Capability (ROC) statement under a Projected Operational Environment (POE), ship configuration, specified operating profile, computed workload, and established doctrinal constraints such as standard workweeks, leave policy, etc.

     (3) Manpower Authorization (MPA) (OPNAV-1000/2). The qualitative and

    quantitative expression of manpower requirements authorized by CNO for a naval activity. It has the following uses and applications:

     (a) As an expression of manpower needs of an activity, it is the authority used by the Chief of Naval Personnel and the applicable Enlisted Personnel Distribution Office to provide requisite military personnel distribution and Naval Reserve recall.

     (b) It is the basic document for current and future peacetime and mobilization Navy military manpower planning in the areas of personnel strength planning, recruiting, training, promotion, personnel distribution and Naval Reserve recall.

     (c) It is the single official statement of organizational manning and billets authorized. Billets authorized are the billets approved by the Chief of Naval Operations for current operating conditions and may, depending on the mission of the activity, represent full organizational manning, i.e., SMD or SQMD.

     (4) Manpower Authorization Change Request (OPNAV 1000/4A). The document

    used by the activities to request the assignment of manpower or changes to Manpower Authorizations and by the Chief of Naval Operations for the introduction of manpower requirements data into the Navy Manpower Data Accounting System (NMDAS).

     (5) Enlisted Distribution Verification Report (EDVR/1080-14). A monthly report

    promulgated by the Enlisted Personnel Management Center (EPMAC) and verified by each activity, the EDVR shows the on board count ratings, NEC codes, distribution NECs and any

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    projected losses or gains. Manning and assignment decisions are based upon information contained in the EDVR. Each activity must keep its account up-to-date and accurate by reporting personnel events as they occur and correcting errors when identified.

     c. Qualification Programs. References:

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume II, Ch. 11, and Volume V, Ch.

     2

     (1) Personnel Qualification Standards (PQS) Program. PQS is a written compilation of

    knowledge and skills for officers and enlisted personnel. PQS is designed as a tool for record keeping of training accomplished and means for displaying (in the work center) individual qualifications. Aviation personnel solely for shipboard Damage Control qualifications, shipboard 3M qualifications, Enlisted Aviation Warfare (EAWS) qualifications and Safety qualifications use PQS.

     (2) Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP). MTIP is a training

    management system, which through diagnostic testing procedures identifies training deficiencies at both the organizational and intermediate levels of maintenance. The program is compatible with and supports the formal technical training programs in naval aviation.

     (3) Certification/Licensing Program. References:

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program

     Volume II, Chapter 4, 5, 9 and 10

     Volume III, Chapter 7, 10,

     (a) Certain skills within the maintenance department require periodic certification or recertification, such as welders, Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) technicians, ordnance handling and engine test cell operators. Operation of various types of Support Equipment (SE) requires licensed personnel. The NAMP manual lists the skills requiring certification/licensing and the pertinent references.

     d. Training. References.

     OPNAVINST 3500.34 Personnel Qualification Standards

     (PQS) Program

     OPNAVINST 5100.19 Navy Occupational Safety and Health

     Program Manual for Forces Afloat

     OPNAVINST 5100.23 Navy Occupational Safety and Health

     Program Manual

     NAVPERS 18068F Navy Enlisted Manpower and

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     Personnel Classifications and

     Occupational Standards

     MCO 4790.20 ITSS MATMEP Procedures

     NAVEDTRA 43100-1G PQS Management Guide

     COMNAVAIRESINST 1500.5 Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force

     Aviation Master Training Manual

     (1) Training Prior to Reporting. Whenever possible, personnel ordered into

    maintenance positions should receive schooling prior to reporting to the activity.

     (2) Training Programs. Maintenance training is available from the Naval Air

    Maintenance Training Detachments (NAMTDs), Fleet Readiness Aviation Maintenance Personnel (FRAMP) program, NAESU personnel, and the Naval Aviation Depots (NADEPs). Requests for quota control for training courses must be submitted by the activity to individual training activities, i. e., NAMTD, FRAMP, etc. The advantages of each type of training and the end results should be considered when planning for projected personnel losses, deployment, etc.

     (3) Support Equipment (SE) Training. References.

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program

     Volume II, Chapter 4, 5, and 9 Volume

     III, Chapter 7,10, and 11

     (a) The NAMP manual lists the specific SE requiring operator licenses and the applicable training course for each piece of equipment. Operator training is usually conducted at the intermediate maintenance level. This does not include on-type aircraft training.

     e. Naval Aviation Engineering Service Unit (NAESU). References.

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume II, Chapter 11

     NAVAIRINST 4350.2C Engineering and Technical Service

     Criteria, Utilization and Procurement of

     (1) NAESU is an Engineering and Technical Services (ETS) organization, which provides engineering assistance and on-site, on-the-job squadron "O", and "I" level individualized tutor type training tailored to customer needs. Services are provided by qualified DOD military and civilian personnel and by employees of commercial or industrial companies, which include: Navy Civilian Technical Services (NCTS) specialists, Navy

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    Military Technical Services (NMTS) specialists and Contractor Engineering Technical Services (CETS) specialists.

     f. Enlisted Flight Orders. Reference:

     BUPERSINST 1326.4D Administration of Enlisted Flight

     Orders

     (1) Personnel assigned flight orders are required to have an annual physical and maintain qualifications in appropriate types of survival training and equipment. Maintenance personnel on Temporary Flight Orders should be made available to obtain the necessary flight time to maintain qualification.

     g. Flight Deck Hazardous Duty Pay (FDHDP). References.

     OPNAVINST 7220.4H Incentive Pay for Hazardous Duty of

     Flight Decks

     (1) Entitlement of Flight Deck Hazardous Duty Pay (FDHDP) is set forth in OPNAVINST 7220.4H for each type squadron/ship. Allocation of FDHDP within the activity is the responsibility of the aviation maintenance manager. Coordination should be maintained with COMCARAIRWING Maintenance Officer for squadron personnel assigned TAD for flight deck servicing of aircraft, such as the LOX pool, and through Air Operations for IMA afloat.

     h. SEAOPDET. Reference.

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume 5, Ch 3 and 5

     (1) SEAOPDET. A program designed to reduce dependence on CETS in the AIMD

    during aircraft carrier (CV) deployments. SEAOPDET will accomplish this by establishing an interdependent, upwardly mobile manpower plan for AIMD TAD augmentation personnel and shore/CV AIMD "core" personnel. SEAOPDET will ensure intermediate level technicians have the long-term specialization required to operate/maintain complex weapons systems/SE and that only technicians of proven ability are deployed. SEAOPDET is designed to use "A" school graduates as apprentice/bench operators in the performance of intermediate level maintenance on aircraft components and the operation of related support equipment. After an initial operator tour, these individuals will be provided the opportunity to reenlist for duty in the shore AIMD and receive the requisite training to upgrade their expertise to the journeyman/bench maintainer level. Upon completion of their shore duty tour, they will have the essential training and professional competence to be assigned to a CV AIMD and be able to perform independent of CETS.

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    Section 3 Maintenance Management

    Back to Table of Contents

1. Maintenance Management. Maintenance management is comprised of the

    management of personnel, aircraft, SE and material. The Maintenance Data System (MDS) can assist in all of these functions.

     a. Organization. References:

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume II, Chapter 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 10,

     Volume III, Chapter 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10,

     11, 13, and 16

     (1) The overall objective of the activity's maintenance effort is to ensure availability of aircraft required to meet operational commitments. The Aviation Maintenance Manager is responsible for managing the total maintenance effort to attain this goal. The maintenance department organization has been developed to assist the Aviation Maintenance Manager in meeting this objective.

     (2) Maintenance Administration. Maintenance Administration provides the personnel

    accounting, record keeping, and the clerical duties associated with administrative support.

     (3) Quality Assurance/Analysis. Quality Assurance/Analysis provides the maintenance

    department with inspection techniques and monitoring procedures to assure quality control as described in Section IV of this guide.

     (4) Maintenance/Material Control. Maintenance/Material Control has the responsibility

    for coordinating the repair of discrepancies; inspection, servicing, launch/recovery of aircraft; and scheduled/unscheduled maintenance of Aviation Life Support Systems and SE. To coordinate these efforts, maintenance control functions as a centralized control point. Maintenance Control is equipped with the appropriate display boards, record forms, and communication systems, etc. to expeditiously manage and direct the maintenance effort.

     (5) Maintenance Divisions. The three maintenance divisions under the Maintenance

    Material Control Officer (MMCO) perform the bulk of the maintenance effort. These divisions are the Aircraft division, the Avionics/Armament division and the Line division. The composition of these divisions and their functions are outlined in the NAMP Manual (Volume II, Chapter 2). Detailed responsibilities and qualifications of selected personnel are also described in the NAMP Manual.

     b. Online Maintenance Management Links.

     https://home.navair.navy.mil/redstripes/ Red Stripe Website

    http://www.nalda.navy.mil/aems AEMS Reporting Website

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     c. Command Relationships. Reference:

     COMNAVAIRFORISNT 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume I, Chapter 4 Volume III,

     Chapter 3 and 4

     (1) Command Relationship. Command Relationship is divided into two areas:

    custodial responsibility (for aircraft) and maintenance/logistics responsibility.

     (2) Custodial Responsibility. Chain of Command for Custodial Responsibility: Chief of Naval Operations, Aircraft Controlling Custodian, Reporting Custodian.

     (3) Maintenance/Logistics Responsibility. Chain of Command for

    Maintenance/Logistics Responsibility: Chief of Naval Operations, Commander Naval Air Systems, Command/Naval Supply System Command, Type Commander,

    COMCARAIRWING (CVW) (when embarked), Type Wing (when ashore), Squadron/Unit.

     d. Management Responsibilities.

     (1) Manpower Management. The Aviation Maintenance Manager is responsible for

    selection, training, utilization and evaluation of assigned personnel. The Aviation Maintenance Manager must constantly be aware of any factor adversely affecting these areas.

     (2) Financial Management. Flight Operations OPTAR (OFC-01) and Aviation Fleet

    Maintenance OPTAR (OFC-50). Reference:

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume II, Chapter 6 Volume III,

     Chapter 8

     NAVSO Publication 3006 Financial Management of Resources

     Operations and Maintenance (for Shore

     Activities)

     NAVSO Publication 3013-1 Financial Management of Resources

     Fund Administration (Operating

     Forces)

     (a) Flight Operations (OFC-01) funds are those required by the squadron to perform its mission. Items included in this category are fuel; lube oil and fuel additives, pilot/crew flight clothing and operational equipment, administrative services, liquid and breathing oxygen, nitrogen, forms and publications, audiovisual costs, and flight deck clothing. Aviation Operation Maintenance (OFC-50) funds are used in maintenance of aircraft, associated ground support equipment, fuel consumed in associated ground support equipment and consumable hand tools

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     (3) Financial Management. Funding of Aviation Depot Level (AVDLR) Repairables:

     (a) Commencing 1 April 1985, repairables that were "free" in the past are paid for by the user. From a fleet perspective, there are two major changes associated with the AVDLR program. The first was establishment of a full carcass-tracking program between the Aviation Supply Office (ASO) and the user. The second major change was the user pays Aviation Operations Maintenance (AOM) dollars for the AVDLRs, and these charges will be reflected in the Flying Hour Cost Report. Maintenance Managers must be as concerned with AOM costs as the squadron is with fuel costs.

     (4) Operational Management. Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures

    Standardization (NATOPS) Program: NATOPS prescribes the checklists to be used for Functional Check Flights and presents a detailed description of aircraft systems, performance data and operating procedures for safe and effective operation of the aircraft. The NATOPS manuals are not maintenance publications, but knowledge of their contents is helpful in explaining system procedures to maintenance and/or flight crews.

     e. Maintenance Programs.

     (1) Monthly Maintenance Plan. Reference:

     COMNAVAIRFORINST 4790.2 Naval Aviation Maintenance Program,

     Volume II, Chapter 6, and Volume III,

     Chapter 8

     (a) The Monthly Maintenance Plan is used to identify the projected maintenance workload such as inspections, receipts/transfers, technical directive compliance, etc. The Monthly Maintenance Plan provides requirement data for aircraft maintenance, SE material, manpower and training. The Monthly Maintenance Plan is under the cognizance of the MO. Although the format and arrangement are the prerogative of the MO, the plan will contain the following minimum information:

     (b) Projected known operational commitments, including number of flights, flight hours and aircraft utilization goals.

     (c) Dates of scheduled inspections.

     (d) Date of receipt or transfer of aircraft.

     (e) Precision Measuring Equipment (PME) calibration requirements.

     (f) Schedule of technical training.

     (g) Forced removal items.

     (h) Technical Directive Compliance (TDC) requirements.

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