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Teaching yes-no response to people with severe aphasia

By Kyle Holmes,2014-05-01 14:51
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Teaching yes-no response to people with severe aphasia

    Teaching yes-no response to people with severe aphasia

    Make some cards with simple pictures of very familiar but distinctive items For example, apple, banana, dog, cat, bird, TV, chair, bed, telephone, hat, pants, shoes Each card should have one picture.

    Real items may be used instead. In this case, point to the item instead of showing the card.

Teach the pictures

    Show each card and name the card.

Establish the “Yes” response

    Show each card and ask, “Is this a ___?, giving the correct name.

    Establish a yes response that the person can produce and which is recognizable to the conversational partner.

    Continue until the person produces the “Yes” response clearly and consistently.

    After a clear “Yes” response is established, go through the deck again and discard any picture that the person hesitates on or does not clearly recognize.

Establish the “No” response

    Show each card and ask, “Is this a ___?, giving an obviously wrong response.

    For example, for the picture of the TV, ask, “Is this a bird?”

    The person may be confused by your obviously wrong word. Smile broadly, and say and show “No” in an obvious way, that shows the person that this is a funny game.

    Establish a contrasting “No” response that the person can produce and which is recognizable to the conversational partner.

    Continue until the person produces the “No” response clearly and consistently.

Contrasting “Yes” and “No”

    Show each card, eliciting a “No” response.

    As soon as a “No” response is clearly and consistently produced, switch to eliciting a “Yes” response.

    Continue eliciting a “Yes” response until it is clearly and consistently produced.

    Then switch to eliciting a “No” response again.

    Continue alternating series of “Yes” and “No”. Continue each series until the response is clearly and consistently produced.

Random production of “Yes” and “No”

    When the person is able to produce alternating “Yes” and “No” responses, begin eliciting “Yes” and “No” responses randomly.

This process took about two ? hour sessions.

    In following sessions, “Yes” and “No” should be reviewed for about 10 minutes to maintain gains until robustly established. Vary the vocabulary items and use both cards and real objects.

Below are more advanced “yes/no” comprehension tasks.

Is this a bird? Is this a cat?

    Is it red? Is it blue?

    Is it cleaning it’s claw? Is it eating meat? Does it have teeth? Does it have two wings? Does it have a tail? Does it have two tails? Can it swim? Can it fly?

    Is this a cat? Is this a fish? Is it red and blue? Is it black and white? Does it have feet? Does it have fins? Does it have wings? Does it have a tail? Can it run? Does it fly? Does it eat meat? Does it eat seeds?

    Is this a horse? Is this a fish? Is it red? Is it brown? Does it have feet? Does it have fins? Does it have wings? Does it have a tail? Can it swim? Can it fly?

    Is this a cow? Is this a bull? Is this a cow? Is this a bull? Is it brown? Is it yellow? Does it eat meat? Does it eat grass? Does the calf drink milk? Does the calf drink

    coffee?

    Does it have 4 feet? Does it have one leg? Does it have wings? Does it have one tail? Can it fly? Can it fly?

    Is this a bird? Is this a horse? Is it brown? Is it blue?

    Does it eat meat? Does it eat grass? Does it have 4 feet? Does it have one foot? Does it have wings? Does it have one tail? Can it fly? Can it fly?

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