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The True Born Englishman by Defoe

By David Mcdonald,2014-11-19 07:15
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The True Born Englishman by Defoeby,By,The,True,Born,Defoe,the,born,defoe

    The True Born Englishman

     By Daniel Defoe (16601731)

    What eer they were theyre true-born English now. Thus from a mixture of all kinds began,

    That hetrogeneous thing, an Englishman:

    In eager rapes, and furious lust begot, The wonder which remains is at our pride, Betwixt a painted Britain and a Scot. To value that which all wise men deride. Whose gendring off-spring quickly learnd to bow, For Englishmen to boast of generation, And yoke their heifers to the Roman plough: Cancels their knowledge, and lampoons the nation.

    A true-born Englishmans a contradiction, From whence a mongrel half-bred race there came,

    With neither name, nor nation, speech nor fame. In speech an irony, in fact a fiction. In whose hot veins new mixtures quickly ran, A banter made to be a test of fools, Infusd betwixt a Saxon and a Dane. Which those that use it justly ridicules. While their rank daughters, to their parents just, A metaphor invented to express Receivd all nations with promiscuous lust. A man a-kin to all the universe. This nauseous brood directly did contain

    For as the Scots, as learned men ha said, The well-extracted blood of Englishmen.

    Throughout the world their wandring seed ha spread;

    Which medly cantond in a heptarchy, So open-handed England, tis believd,

    Has all the gleanings of the world receivd. A rhapsody of nations to supply,

    Among themselves maintaind eternal wars,

    And still the ladies lovd the conquerors. Some think of England twas our Saviour meant,

     The Gospel should to all the world be sent: The western Angles all the rest subdud; Since, when the blessed sound did hither reach, A bloody nation, barbarous and rude: They to all nations might be said to preach. Who by the tenure of the sword possest

    One part of Britain, and subdud the rest Tis well that virtue gives nobility, And as great things denominate the small, How shall we else the want of birth and blood supply? The conquring part gave title to the whole. Since scarce one family is left alive, The Scot, Pict, Britain, Roman, Dane, submit, Which does not from some foreigner derive. And with the English-Saxon all unite:

    And these the mixture have so close pursud, ******************************************** The very name and memorys subdud: Questions:

    No Roman now, no Britain does remain; 1. Who is Daniel Defoe and what is his major work? Wales strove to separate, but strove in vain: Say something about him.

    The silent nations undistinguishd fall, 2. What did Defoe try to express? And Englishmans the common name for all.

    Fate jumbled them together, God knows how;

    1

vocabulary

    hetrogeneous: heterogeneous, consisting of elements that are not of the same kind or nature; the opposite word is

    homogeneous

    rhapsody: an epic poem adapted for recitation

    mongrel: mixed blood, not genuine

    jumble: a confused multitude of things

    deride: treat or speak of with contempt, mock

    lampoon: ridicule with satire

    Preview Questions for "Old and Middle English Literature":

1. Give an account of the history of England from the Celtic settlements to the Norman Conquest.

    2. How did Chrisianity came to England? Name the most important monasteries of this period.

    3. Name some representative pieces of the Old English poetry.

    4. Name the two most important Christian poets of this period. 5. Analyse the artistic features of Beowulf.

    6. What was the social and class reality of the Anglo Norman Period? 7. Tell the three divisions of romances according to subject matter. 8. Name two more well-known writers of this period and their achievements besides Chaucer and his literary works.

    9. Say as much as you know about Chaucer's life and works. 10. Comment on the artistic features of The Canterbury Tales.

    11. Sum up Chaucer's achievements and contributions.

    12. Please know some literary terms which will be used in the future studies.

Epic

    Alliteration

    Iambic pentameter

    Romance

    Ballad

    2

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