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Leonardo and the Flying Boy Written by Laurence Anholt P1 THERE ...

By Maria Armstrong,2014-09-10 18:27
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Leonardo and the Flying Boy Written by Laurence Anholt P1 THERE ...Leon

Leonardo and the Flying Boy

    Written by Laurence Anholt

P1

    THERE were no spaceships or airplanes when Zoro was a boy. The sky belonged to the birds. But one man dreamed of something incredible. One day, Zoro, he told his pupil, people will sail through the clouds

    and look down at the world below.

    Anything is possible.

    P2

    The man with the amazing dream and a beard like a wizard was Leonardo da Vinci.

    P3

    Anything seemed possible in Leonardos busy studio. He was a painter, a

    sculptor, a musician, and a scientist.

     Sometimes he showed Zoro his beautiful notebooks where a thousand ideas spilled from every page.

     We must try to understand everything, said the great genius

    P4

    How does life begin?

    How does a plant grow?

    How do the planets move? And how could a person fly like a bird?

     But when Zoro tried to read the books, he found them written back to front:

    So the secret word could only be read in mirror. (opposite way) P5

    There was one place where Zoro could never go one mysterious

    workshop where the door was always locked. No one was allowed in there except Leonardo himself.

     Zoro longed to know what was inside. Maybe its a fantastic

    sculpture, he thought, or a huge war machine.

    P6

    In the studio everyone had to work hard. Zoro mixed colors, cleaned brushes and practiced his drawing.

    When I am grown-up, I will have my own studio,

    he said, “and a secret workshop, too!

     Of course you will, Zoro, smiled Leonardo.

    P7

    Leonardo was a kind man. If ever he found an animal that was sick or hungry, he would bring it home for his pupils to take care of. But one day, Leonardo found something very strange. He dragged the wild and noisy creature into the studio, where it kicked and fought and spat at the great artist. What is it? asked Zoro.

    P8

    Its a boy! laughed Leonardo. A very wild boy. Hes never been to

    school and his mother is too poor to take care of him. She begged me to give him some work before he ends up in prison.

     The wild boy grabbed Leonardos hand and bit very hard. Leonardo

    pretended to be angry, but Zoro could see that he was laughing.

     Ill call you Salai, said Leonardo. “It means Little Devil, and

    thats exactly what you are.

    P9

    So Salai came to stay in the studio and, although he was a bad boy, everyone grew to like him.

     But you cant wear those rags, said Leonardo. Im going to buy

    you a real velvet suit and some shoes

    Now where did I leave my money?

    They searched high and low until at last Zoro found the money hidden

    in Salais filthy coat.

    P10

    Zoro couldnt believe it. Who would dare to steal from Leonardo da Vinci?

    P11

    Day after day, Leonardo dreamed up inventions of every kind. Zoro was amazed to see a parachute, the very first bicycle, a deadly was machine,

    P12

    a gadget for walking on water, a life preserver, and a diving suit. Once, he built a machine for cutting and polishing glass and made himself a pair of spectacles.

    Now I can keep an eye on Salai! he said, winking at Zoro.

    P13

    Early one morning, Leonardo took Zoro into town to look for interesting faces to draw. When he noticed someone especially beautiful or unusually

    ugly, Leonardo would follow them, making dozens of sketches.

     They came to the market where a lady was selling birds in tiny cages.

     Leonardo looked at the birds, then, to Zoros surprise, he bought

    them all; but instead of taking the birds home as pets, Leonardo told Zoro to open the cages. Everybody stared. No one could understand. P14

    A bird should be free, said Leonardo. Look, Zoro! Can you see how

    their wings push against the air? It gives me an idea…”

    P15

    Leonardo began to run.

     As soon as he got home, he locked himself in the secret workshop again. Zoro could hear hammering and sawing from inside.

     Hour after hour, Zoro waited, but Leonardo wouldnt stop for food or

    drink. What on earth was he building?

     It must be something incredible, thought Zoro. Something no one

    had ever dreamed of.

    P16

    At last he fell asleep on the steps outside.

    P17

    Leonardo began a wonderful painting of a woman called Mona Lisa. She had to sit for weeks without moving, so Leonardo paid acrobats and musicians to keep her from getting bored.

     Zoro stared at the dreamy green mountains and the twisting rivers.

     Surely no one has painted anything so perfect, he thought.

     The face in the painting was smiling a mysterious, gentle smile.

     Its as if she knows some secret, thought Zoro. As if she has seen

    inside that locked room.

    P18

    Suddenly Salai crept up behind him.

    Come with me, Zoro! he hissed. Ill show you something more

    interesting than that picture. Salai looked very suspicious. He dragged Zoro out of the studio and quietly down the stairs. At the door of the secret workshop, Salai pulled out a big bunch of keys.

     You stole them! gasped Zoro. Leonardo will throw you back on

    the street!

     Salai only laughed and unlocked the door.

     Zoro knew he shouldnt be there. He should turn and run to Leonardo, but he just had to see inside that secret room.

P19

    Zoro couldnt believe his eyes! An extraordinary machine filled the room. Its wings were like a great eagles. Help me pull it outside, ordered

    Salai. If we wait until Leonardo is ready, we will never fly. Anyway, you are the only one small enough to fit in the machine. It was made for you

    you will be the Flying Boy!

    P20

    Leonardo will be furious, whispered Zoro.

    Not when he sees you flying above the studio! shouted Salai.

    Come on, Zoro. Help me.

    So, as Leonardo worked upstairs, Salai and Zoro hauled and dragged the heavy machine out of the workshop, along the streets, and far into the fields.

    Salai pointed to the highest hill.

    We will try the machine from there, he said.

    P21

    As the sun set, they reached the top.

    P22

    Now, panted Salai, just lie in here. When you pedal, the wings will flap.

     Zoro was shaking. He felt ill.

     Maybe the machine isnt finished, he cried. We should be

    patient…”

     But Salai ws already strapping Zoro into the machine and dragging it toward the edge of the hill.

     Zoro was terrified. He began to shout.

    Suddenly there was a gust of wind, Salai pushed and the flying machine left the ground.

     Zoro looked down at the world below; he was sobbing with fear, but for a few seconds

    P23

    he flew like a bird!

    P24 Picture

    P25

    It works! It works! shouted the wild boy far below.

    But something was wrong!

    The bird was too heavy. Zoro pedalled and pulled, but the machine began to fall.

    At that moment, Leonardo came running across the fields. Zoro tugged on the ropes and screamed, as the machine fell like a stone and crashed into a tree.

    P26

    Leonardo himself pulled Zoros limp body from the wrecked machine and

    carefully carried him home.

    Salai followed slowly his head hanging in shame.

    P27

    Zoro was lying in bed. His leg hurt. His head was wrapped in bandages. Oh, Zoro, said Leonardo sadly, it doesn‟t surprise me that Salai would

    disobey me. But you

    Perhaps I was wrong. Perhaps people will never fly. We are not birds. From now on I will stick to painting.

    No, said Zoro quietly. Remember what you told me one day people

    WILL fly! The machine was too heavy, thats all.

    P28

    Leonardo thought for a moment. Then he jumped up. Yes! he shouted.

    And the wings should be longer. Like this…”

    And he threw open his notebook and began to work, slowly and patiently, until a beautiful drawing appeared a new flying machine, more amazing

    than ever.

    And while he worked, Leonardo began to smile, a mysterious, gentle smile, a mysterious, gentle smile as if he could see far the future where boys and girls just like Zoro would sail through the clouds

    P29

    ...and anything is possible.

    P30

    LEONARDO DA VINCI

    was born in 1452, the son of a rich lawyer and a poor peasant woman.

     This great genius of the Italian Renaissance left few paintings, but his many notebooks give insight into a man who, according to the painter and biographer Vasari, was “marvelously endowed by heaven with beauty,

    grace and talent in such abundance that he leaves other men far behind.

    Vasari also notes that the gentle vegetarian was strong enough to bend a horseshoe with his bare hands.

     Leonardo conceived the breathtaking plan of making a pictorial record of every object in the world. He was a supremely talented painter, architect, musician, military engineer, mathematician, botanist,

    astronomer, and, above all, inventor. Many of his devices were doomed to failure because of the limits of contemporary materials, but his designs for tanks, submarines, parachutes, hoists, pulleys, and levers were uncannily ahead of their time and he became a favorite at the courts of Milan and France.

     Leonardos obsession with flight lasted throughout his life. It is unlikely that his contraptions stayed airborne for long, but he certainly made several attempts, and Zoros leap from Mount Ceccero became

    legendary. Zoro (Zoroaste de Peretolo) was one of Leonardos many

    apprentice pupils as was Salai Giacomo (1480-1524) who was taken in

    by Leonardo at ten years old. Leonardo recorded Salais many thefts and

    delinquent acts, and at one point wrote the words, THIEF, LIAR,

    OBSTINATE GLUTTON! in the margin of his note book, in which

    Salai later scribbled obscene drawings. The untalented and mischievous boy stayed with Leonardo until the masters death in 1519, and Leonardo

    even left him substantial property. Salai met a predictably reckless end when he was killed by a crossbow.

     Zoros history is not well documented but he undoubtedly became a highly talented artist who contributed to his masters great paintings,

    where their brush marks are now inseparable.

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