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INTRODUCTION - ARNOLD-AIR.ORG / SILVER-WINGS.ORG

By Phillip Porter,2014-07-05 11:58
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THIS KNOWLEDGE GUIDE WILL BE THERE TO SERVE YOU WITH MUCH OF THE INFORMATION THAT YOU WILL NEED IN ORDER TO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE THE AAS NATIONAL TEST.

Candidate Knowledge Guide

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 2

    THE CANDIDATE PROGRAM (From the National Director of Training) .............................. 3 AAS HISTORY ........................................................................................................................ 4

    GENERAL OF THE AIR FORCE HENRY “HAP” ARNOLD ................................................. 5

    CHAPTER 1: General Information ........................................................................................... 7 CHAPTER 2: Membership ..................................................................................................... 10

    CHAPTER 3: Staff Positions, Responsibilities, and Rank ....................................................... 11 CHAPTER 4: Structure ........................................................................................................... 13

    CHAPTER 5: Conclaves ......................................................................................................... 15

    CHAPTER 6: Affiliated Organizations ................................................................................... 16

    CHAPTER 7: Mechanics of AAS ........................................................................................... 18

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INTRODUCTION

    By becoming a candidate for entry into the Arnold Air Society, you have taken the first step in becoming a better cadet and ultimately a better officer in the United States Air Force. Your participation in AAS as a candidate and later as an active member will give you valuable experience in leadership, organization, and teamwork. You are a candidate for active membership in an organization with a great name and reputation for which you must always strive to live up to.

    This manual will serve as a text to acquaint you with the mission, organization, and functions of the Arnold Air Society and prepare you for membership. Only through active participation in the society will you fully understand and appreciate AAS. Be proud to be a candidate, and work hard for your membership in the society.

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THE CANDIDATE PROGRAM (From the National Director of Training)

    I first would like to congratulate you on your decision to become a candidate of Arnold Air Society. Your decision is the first step to becoming an active member of Arnold Air Society and of a professional, honorary, service organization. The candidate process in which you are about to embark is designed to prepare you for an active membership in Arnold Air Society. Your training staff and the active members of your squadron are there to guide you and help you succeed in your goal of becoming an active member. Ultimately though, it is your responsibility to successfully complete the training program. Each individual training program throughout the country is slightly different; however each candidate training program will be conducted in accordance with the rules and regulations found in AASMAN-1. As a candidate I strongly recommend that you become familiar with AASMAN-1 as soon as you possibly can. More specifically I encourage you, the candidate, to become familiar with these sections of AASMAN-1:

    Attachment 2- Candidate Training Program, Initiation Ceremony, and the National Test

Attachment 7- AAS Candidate Handout Concerning Hazing

    AASMAN-1 can be found on online at the national website at www.arnold-air.org

    If a problem should arise during your candidate training, remember to use your chain of command. However, should a problem arise that you do not feel comfortable communicating to your trainer or your AAS Squadron Commander about (i.e. hazing), talk to your squadron advisor. Just remember that your training staff is selected from the best qualified members and they have your best interests in mind.

    This knowledge guide will be there to serve you with much of the information that you will need in order to successfully complete the AAS National Test. I urge you to familiarize yourself with this guide and try to remember the content in it. Not only will the information be on the national test but it also reminds us of our heritage and where we came from as a society and as the greatest Air Force in the world!

    Again I want to congratulate you on your decision and I look forward to seeing you as an Active Member of Arnold Air Society. Good Luck!

    BRADLEY J SHOULDERS, C/Lt Col, AAS

    National Director of Training

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AAS HISTORY

    Arnold Air Society is a professional, honorary, service organization advocating the support of aerospace power. AAS is formally affiliated with AFROTC and the Air Force Association. It is a national extracurricular organization available to Air Force ROTC and Academy cadets.

    In 1947, at an AFROTC summer camp, a group of cadets from the University of Cincinnati discussed the possibility of an honorary society. After taking their idea to members of their cadre, a committee of cadets was formed to write a constitution and to choose a name for their newly founded society. The name they chose was the “Arnold Society of Air Cadets,” in honor

    of General Henry H. Arnold. Arnold Air Society grew very quickly from its inception in the summer of 1947. High morals, physical fitness, and positive mental attitude formed the foundation of the Society. These characteristics were the basis for the Society’s efforts to mold young cadets into future Air Force leaders.

    The United States Air Force officially recognized the Society in April of 1948, and the Air Defense Command sent copies of the Society’s constitution to all colleges and universities throughout the nation in hopes of forming similar organizations. Within the next year, twenty new squadrons were formed.

    National Conclaves were one of the many new ideas that came about in the early 1950’s. The first NATCON was held at the University of Cincinnati in 1950. This conclave was convened to determine the policies for the Society. Mrs. Eleanor Arnold was named the Honorary Sponsor, and General James Doolittle was chosen to be the Honorary Commander following the death of General Arnold. This same year, the organization became officially known as the “Arnold Air Society.” During the second NATCON, the Society became affiliated with the Air Force

    Association. At the fourth and fifth NATCONs, a reconstruction of the organizational structure of the Society was proposed. This resulted in the formation of the Executive Board, consisting of the AAS national and area leadership. At following conclaves, more awards and policies were initiated, such as the formation of Angel Flight in 1952, and the Arnold Air Society-Link Foundation Fellowship Awards for graduate work.

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GENERAL OF THE AIR FORCE HENRY “HAP” ARNOLD

    “It’s got to be done and done quickly, so let’s get it done.”

     General “Hap” Arnold

    Henry H. Arnold was born in Gladwyn, Pennsylvania, on 25 June 1886. Following graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, he was appointed a Second Lieutenant of Infantry on 14 June 1907. In 1911 he entered aviation and became a flyer. He was detailed to the Signal Corps in April 1911, piloting the Wright Bi-Plane. He was one of the first flyers taught by the Wright Brothers.

    In June 1912, General Arnold established a new altitude record when he piloted a Brugress-Wright airplane to a height of 6,540 feet. He participated in the Regular Army and National Guard Movements in the states of New York and Connecticut and established several aeronautical records. On 9 October 1912, Arnold won the first Mackay Trophy to be awarded for his flight demonstrations.

    He progressed rapidly through the ranks, and by 11 February 1935 he had received the temporary rank of Brigadier General. This rank was made permanent on 02 December 1940. He was awarded permanent rank of Major General and became Chief of the Army Air Forces in 1941. In March 1942, “Hap” Arnold became Commanding General of the Army Air Force.

    He retired from the service on 30 June 1946 with the ratings of Command Pilot and Combat Observer. His many accomplishments, of both personal and national significance, gained him the distinction of becoming the first five-star General of the United States Air Force on 07 May 1949 by an act of Congress.

    General Arnold passed away on 15 January 1950 of a cardiac condition.

    For his service, he received the Distinguished Flying Cross in November 1936 and the Distinguished Service Medal in October 1942. Arnold was awarded the Air Medal in March 1943, and in September 1945 he received the Oak Leaf Cluster to the Distinguished Service Medal. In October 1945, he was awarded a second Oak Leaf Cluster to the Distinguished Service Medal. His other awards included: The World War II Victory Medal; American Defense Medal; American Theater Ribbon; Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon; European-African-Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon, 1942-1943; U.S. Military Badge No. 1; Morocco’s Grand

    Cross, Grand Officer of the Commander (Ouissam Alaouite); Yugoslavia’s Sun in the degree of

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    Grand Aztec Eagle; Mexico’s Order of Military Merit; and England’s Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath.

    The H. H. Arnold Award was established in honor of General Arnold by the Air Force Association in 1948. It is presented for the “most outstanding contributions toward the peace and the security of the United States in the field of aviation.”

    General Arnold had but one theme: “It’s got to be done and done quickly, so let’s get it done.” We all share a common pride in General Henry “Hap” Arnold, the man who had the

    imagination to see success and the confidence to create it.

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    CHAPTER 1: General Information

    1-1 Type of Organization

    Arnold Air Society is a professional, honorary, service organization advocating the support of aerospace power.

a. Arnold Air Society is “professional” because of the established intent of its members

    to become officers in the United States Air Force. It strives to instill in its members an attitude of unselfish dedication to, and responsibility for, fulfillment of the missions of the Air Force and Arnold Air Society.

    b. Arnold Air Society is “honorary” because of the high standards required of all cadets earning membership.

    c. Arnold Air Society is “service” oriented because of the contributions and assistance provided to the community, the campus, and officer commissioning programs.

    1-2 The Arnold Air Society Motto

“The warrior who cultivates his mind polishes his arms.” Duc de Boufflers

    1-3 Missions of Arnold Air Society

    The following three objectives were adopted by AAS to enhance the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) and the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA), and to project the image of the United States Air Force on the university campus and in the surrounding community.

First Objective:

    To create a more efficient relationship among Air Force officer candidates, in particular within the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps.

Function of the First Objective:

    To provide opportunities for a greater interaction among collegiate level Air Force officer candidates and to encourage increased communication with Air Force officers and leaders in national defense, government, and industry.

Second Objective:

    To aid in the development of effective Air Force officers.

Function of the Second Objective:

    To provide more opportunities for Air Force officer candidates to exercise leadership, management, organizational, and public relations skills.

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Third Objective:

    To further the purpose, traditions, and concepts of the United States Air Force.

Function of the Third Objective:

    To provide opportunities for officer candidates to participate in campus and community service activities, demonstrating the close relationship between civilian and military institutions.

    1-4 Purposes of Arnold Air Society

    a. AAS provides members excellent opportunities for leadership experience, and opportunities that provide valuable training. The Society furthers a working knowledge of the administrative practices of the USAF, which can be of great value to a member as a cadet and later as an officer.

    b. Within the Society, candidates and members alike find fellowship, become better acquainted with cadre and other officers, and receive more complete training.

c. The Society develops a valuable esprit de corps. Group consciousness among

    members, coupled with improved officer/cadet relationships fostered by the society, leads directly to a stronger, more efficient cadet corps.

    d. The Society, in participation with the Air Force Association, aids members in gaining an understanding and appreciation of aerospace power for national security.

    e. Another important benefit of AAS is that members come in direct contact with other men and women who share similar goals. Members have the mutual objective of promoting and furthering the purpose, traditions, and concept of the United States Air Force.

    1-5 The Colors of the Arnold Air Society

a. White represents the purity of our intent.

b. Red symbolizes the blood shed by Americans fighting for freedom

c. Blue is the color of the sky in which we fly.

    d. Gold (Yellow-Orange) represents the wings with which we fly, and warrior courage.

    1-6 The Arnold Air Society Symbol and Insignia

    a. The AAS badge is an Air Force star of white with a cardinal ball in the center resting on opposed gold wings. Under this are two blue bars with “Arnold Air Society” superimposed on the bars.

    b. The AAS rank pin is an AAS badge with the appropriate officers grade insignia placed between the wings above the star.

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c. The AAS candidate pin is circular and bears the white star and cardinal ball of the

    Society.

d. The AAS fourragere is a single loop, square weave, blue and gold, multi-strand cord.

    e. The AAS membership ribbon is a gold, white, blue, and red ribbon.

    1-7 The Official Flower of Arnold Air Society

    The official flower of the Arnold Air Society is the Crimson Glory Rose.

    One More Roll

    We toast our hearty comrades who have

    Fallen from the skies, and were gently caught

    By God’s own hand to be with Him on High.

    To dwell among the soaring clouds

    They’ve known so well before.

    From victory Roll to tail chase, at Heaven’s very door.

    As we fly among them there we’re sure to

    Hear their plea, take care my friend,

    Watch your six,

    and do one more roll for me.

    -Commander Jerry Coffee

    Hanoi, 1968

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