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TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION METHODS A SYSTEMATICALLY APPROACH TO ...

By Hector Howard,2014-07-04 08:51
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ONE OF THE MOST WIDELY USED DEFINITIONS OF SAFETY CULTURE IS THE ONE DEVELOPED BY THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON THE SAFETY OF NUCLEAR INSTALLATIONS (ACSNI).

Table of contents

    1.0 Introduction

    2.0 Methods

    3.0 A systematically approach to continuous improvement

    4.0 Safety Culture maturity levels

    INSJÖ - a unique maritime safety system for improving of safety culture 5.0

    6.0 Interview

    7.0 Comparison of safety culture aspects in three transport branches

    8.0 Conclusion and summery

    9.0 References

1.0 Introduction

    One of the most widely used definitions of safety culture is the one developed by the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI).

    The safety culture of an organization is the product of individual and group values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies, and patterns of behaviour that determine the commitment to, and the style and proficiency of, an organization’s health and safety management. Organizations

    with a positive safety culture are characterized by communications founded on mutual trust, by shared perceptions of the importance of safety and by confidence in the efficacy of preventive measures.

    Definitions of safety culture can differ somewhat between different scientists, but usually they include the proactive stance to safety. Learning in an organization is in association with having a proactive approach to safety, which means collecting, monitoring, and analysing relevant information on safety and health, and thus having updated knowledge about how work and safety are functioning. Then a learning culture is created, where one learns from the information gathered, and one is willing to introduce changes when needed. There are three critical aspects for an organisation to succeed in how to develop a safety culture: reporting, justness and flexibility. In a reporting culture, the organization has succeeded in creating trust and commitment in reporting incidents and anomalies in a good manner, and thereby also having a well functioning reporting system. Quick feedback with meaningful information to the reporter is emphasized. This is closely connected to a just culture where a well-balanced

    blame approach enhances the willingness to make such reports. A just culture also has to do with defining safe behaviour. Flexibility in an organization concerns the ability to transform the work organization in order to stand prepared for changing demands during periods of high workload. It also comprises respect for individual’s skills and experiences. Continuous improvements in an organisation imply willingness to change and a condition that the organization regularly faces critical reviews. The organization thus needs to question its way of thinking and looking at things, and new tools and working practices that support continuous improvements must be found and accepted.

2.0 Methods

    For this report I have been using already existing science data. Also an interview with Jan Ifwarsson has been conducted.

3.0 A systematically approach to continuous improvement

    The Deming Cycle, or PDSA, is a model for continues improvement of quality. It consists of a logical sequence of four repetitive steps for continuous improvement and learning: Plan, Do, Study/Check and Act.

    ; Plan. Plan ahead for change.

    ; Do. Execute the plan.

    ; Study/Check. Study the results.

    ; Act. Take action to standardize or improve the process.

4.0 Safety Culture maturity levels

    Organisations that are in the early stages of developing a safety culture are likely to require different improvement techniques from those with well-established safety cultures. Safety improvements in the form of behavioural and cultural approaches are more effective when an organization has reached a maturity level where technical and system problems have been overcome. According to Fleming and his “safety culture maturity model” an organisation must meet a number of criteria in order to be relevant for the application of safety culture maturity levels: implementation of a Safety Management System, behavioural and cultural failures causing the majority of accidents, compliance with health and safety laws, and safety driven by the desire to prevent accidents. Fleming presents a safety culture maturity model with five stages and proposes that organisations progress sequentially trough these levels, by building on the strengths and removing the weaknesses of the previous level.