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2012 CULTURAL VISIONS GRANT APPLICATION - TCU HONORS COLLEGE

By Henry Patterson,2014-07-04 08:45
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THE COLLEGE PROMOTES CRITICAL THINKING AND CREATIVE INQUIRY, AN UNDERSTANDING OF WORLD CULTURES, AND AN APPRECIATION OF IDEAS ACROSS DISCIPLINES. THE COLLEGE ...

    Honors Cultural Visions Grant Application

    Fall 2011

     John V. Roach Honors College:

     817.257.7125, Fax 817.257.6987

     Scharbauer Hall 1016

     TCU Box 297022

     www.honors.tcu.edu

    The John V. Roach Honors College at TCU assists high-achieving students in reaching their full intellectual potential through challenging academic endeavors, a

    unique residential component, and community involvement. The College promotes

    critical thinking and creative inquiry, an understanding of world cultures, and an appreciation of ideas across disciplines. The College fosters student collaboration

    and strives to ingrain inquiry as an authentic, integral, and enduring aspect of

    students’ identities. The College not only enriches the intellectual life of the

    University but also promotes lifelong involvement with local, national, and

    global issues.

    The John V. Roach Honors College invites faculty members to apply for grant

    money in order to develop new or to re-conceptualize existing Honors Cultural Visions courses. Grant money may be used for a wide variety of activities, including

    but not limited to creating an experiential learning component, purchasing materials, and participating in professional development opportunities, all of which will assist the faculty member in enhancing the Honors Cultural Visions classroom.

    The focus of all Honors College courses is on engagement; students are expected to be more critically engaged in an Honors class in order to come to a greater understanding of a given subject than might be achieved in a traditional class. Honors College courses are not necessarily intended to be more difficult or simply demand a greater amount of work than non-Honors classes.

    In Cultural Visions courses, Honors students and faculty engage the ideas, products, and practices of a number of different cultures and historical time periods. They explore some of the complex ways people from around the world, past and present, have lived, thought, and felt about their lives.

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    Over the course of the past few years, Honors students taking Cultural Visions courses have studied the African diaspora, questioned the memory-making processes shaping our understanding of 9/11, examined the political nature of language, explored the role the problem of sovereignty plays in European history, and considered how race is entangled in the politics, religions, economies, and culture of Latin America.

    Cultural Visions courses are open to all Honors students, regardless of major, and are designed to:

    ; Build an interdisciplinary mind, so that students feel more confident reading

    texts outside their majors, or in fields outside their previous intellectual

    comfort zone.

    ; Offer exciting opportunities to learn from professors and alongside engaged

    Honors students.

    ; Focus on learning as inquiry, through reading, writing, and discussion.

    ; Ground this inquiry in materialstexts, artifacts, philosophies, histories

    from a wide range of cultures and traditions, which are provocative, open to

    multiple interpretations, and pose questions for which there is sometimes no

    obvious right answer.

    ; Model discussion as a process of sharing insights, testing one’s own ideas

    against those of others in a safe environment, and learning that reasonable

    people can disagree and discuss their differences.

Catalog Descriptions of Some Interdisciplinary Cultural Visions Courses:

    GRMN 20973 - Honors: The Afterlife of the Classical Greek Tradition

    Core: HUM & LT

    Typically offered: Fall

    Students will examine examples from modern literature, film, architecture, art, psychology, philosophy, and archaeology that are not just a recuperation of the classical Greek past, but also a critical appropriation of it. Students discover how the past is used to understand our present.

GRMN 20983 - Honors: The Afterlife of the Classical Roman Tradition

    Core: HUM & HT

    Typically offered: Spring

    Students will examine examples from modern literature, film, architecture, art, historiography, and archaeology that are not just a recuperation of the classical Roman past, but also a critical appropriation of it. Students discover how the past is used to understand our present.

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HNRS 20213 - Language and Identity: Cultures and Subcultures

    Core: HUM & CA

    Typically offered: Fall

    In this course, students will examine the relationship between language and our roles and identities as relates to our cultural and subcultural backgrounds, including how language varies across social cultures and social situations, how language shapes relationships, and how language variation influences access to success and power.

HNRS 20223 - Language and Identity: Gender

    Core: HUM

    Typically offered: Spring

    In this course, students will examine the role of language in the expression and creation of gender identities, including gender differences in language structure and use, the acquisition of gendered ways of speaking, and sexism in language.

HNRS 20913 - Cultural Memory in the United States I

    Core: HUM & HT

    Typically offered: Fall

    This course explores the role of rhetorical, historical, and new-media expression in creating a cultural memory in the United States. The course will concentrate on how technological innovation mediates the historical foundations of that cultural memory.

HNRS 20923 - Cultural Memory in the United States II

    Core: HUM & LT

    Typically offered: Spring

    This course explores the role of literature and film in creating a cultural memory in the United States. The course will concentrate on how writers and film directors mediate the literary and historical foundations of that cultural memory.

Additional information about Cultural Memory in the United States I and

    II:

    This two-course sequence considers the ways in which the ancient art of memory functions across a range of media, from oral storytelling, to various forms of literature, music, film, and visual arts, to the Internet. In addition, students will sharpen their focus on memory and media by looking carefully at archives and memorials on campus and elsewhere with sections on Pearl Harbor, Disney, the

    JFK assassination, and 9-11. The courses will also include trips to sites such as the Oklahoma City Bombing National Memorial and the Dallas Sixth Floor Museum to help determine what sorts of events/people get memorialized in this culture and how memorials shape individual, public, and institutional memories.

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RELI 20503 - Africa and the African Diaspora: History, Religion, and

    Culture I

    Core: HUM

    Typically offered: Spring (every other year) Next offering: Spring 2012 This class examines the origins and impact of African civilization, focusing on the worlds of traditional religions, Islam, and Christianity in Africa; colonialism, anti-colonial struggles, independence, and post-colonialism; African studies in Western scholarship; and issues affecting modern Africa.

RELI 20513 - Africa and the African Diaspora: History, Religion, and

    Culture II

    Core: HUM & RT

    Note: Students must take BOTH RELI 20503 and 20513 in order to earn RT

    credit.

    Typically offered: Fall (every other year) Next offering: Fall 2012 Building on RELI 20503, this class examines West African religious traditions, the ―involuntary diaspora‖ to the New World, as well as ―creole‖ religions and culture within the Caribbean. It concludes with an account of the rise of the African Independent Churches, the place of women in North African Islam, the presence of Rastafari in Ghana, and the continuing clash of traditional African and Western cultures.

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First Name: Last Name:

Department: TCU Box:

Extension: TCU E-Mail:

Amount Requesting:

What will this grant be used for?

     Development of a new Cultural Visions course

     Re-conceptualizing an existing course (Select one.):

     Current Cultural Visions course:

     Department and Course Number

     Current Honors Elective course:

     Department and Course Number

    Current non-Honors course that I would

     like to make Honors Cultural Visions:

     Department and Course Number

How will you use this grant to develop a new/re-conceptualize an existing Cultural Visions

    course? Select all that apply.

    Experiential learning experience to incorporate into Honors Cultural Visions course

     (e.g. field trip for students)

     Materials to incorporate into Honors Cultural Visions course

    Professional development opportunity/ies (e.g. conferences, workshops, etc.) to

     incorporate into Honors Cultural Visions course

     Other (Please specify):

Current/Proposed Course Title:

When is the first semester you will be able to offer the

    course?

How often will the course be offered?

Maximum class size:

    5

    Do you envision this as a one-semester course or two-semester course sequence?

     One-semester course

     Two-semester course sequence

    Please select the Core Curriculum designation(s) this course already has (for existing courses) or which designation(s) you would like to request (for new courses/changes to existing courses):

     None Humanities

     Religious Traditions Social Sciences

     Historical Traditions Natural Sciences

     Literary Traditions Fine Arts

     Cultural Awareness Mathematical Reasoning

     Global Awareness Writing Emphasis

     Citizenship and Social Values Oral Communications

Please attach the following:

    ; A narrative explaining your request for the Honors Cultural Visions grant. Consider

    the following questions:

    o How will this course meet the philosophy of Honors Cultural Visions courses?

    o What unique learning opportunities will this course create for Honors students?

    o What about the students’ experiences in this course will be different than non-

    Honors courses/Honors elective courses?

    ; A detailed budget proposal outlining anticipated expenses

Your Signature Date

Department Chair Signature Date

    Please return to the John V. Roach Honors College by February 24, 2012

    Scharbauer Hall 1016

    TCU Box 297022

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