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RECIPE STUDENT HANDOUT - MICROSOFT

By Valerie Ray,2014-07-04 08:05
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RESEARCH THE HISTORY AND CULTURE BEHIND A FAVORITE FAMILY RECIPE ... IF SO, TRY THE SITE FOOD, CULTURE, AND TRADITION, WHICH HAS LINKS TO MANY REGIONS AND THEIR FOOD ...

Research the history and culture behind a favorite family

    recipe

    Student Handout

Step 1 Choose your favorite family recipe and research it

    ; Software: Web browser, Microsoft Office Word

    ; What to do: Record the recipe and interview family members about it

     1. Select your favorite family food and get the recipe for it. You may have to ask parents,

    grandparents, aunts, and uncles for help finding the recipe. Make a copy of the recipe. If the recipe

    is not written down, interview the person who knows how to make it and create the written recipe

    yourself.

     2. Interview family members about the cultural and family traditions that are associated with this

    recipe. Ask these questions, among others:

    ; Cultural traditions: What cultural significance does this recipe/food have for your family? For

    example, does this recipe tie you to your grandparents’ or parents’ country of origin? Does it

    represent a larger community that you belong to or a region you are associated with, for

    example, the southern United States. Do you eat this dish only on a certain day of the year, for

    example New Year’s Day, a particular national holiday, or a special religious celebration like

    Chanukah, a Saint’s Day, or Eid? If so, is there a cultural story or reason associated with why

    you eat this dish on this day? For example, southerners in the United States, following an

    African tradition, eat small legumes and greens on New Year’s Day to signify hope for

    prosperity in the coming year.

    ; Family traditions: How is the recipe is important to your family? What traditions surround this

    recipe? Who in your family is famous for this recipe? When did your family first start making

    and eating this recipe?

    Take good notes, either on paper or in Microsoft Office Word.

    3. Bring the recipe and your interview notes to school.

     4. Open Internet Explorer, and go to the food timeline.

     5. Using the food timeline, find out as much information as you can about your recipe and the

    ingredients. For example, if your recipe calls for rice, research rice under the Beginnings column

    and search for recipes that use rice under the Recipes column. For example, you might want to note

    the date the food was introduced to a certain continent and how it was introduced, or whether the

    food is a New World food or not. You may also want to consult the Food History page on the Food

    Timeline Web site for more articles related to your recipe and ingredients, including agriculture,

    economics, science and technology, and laws and regulations. On this site, for example, you can

    find out about Chicago slaughterhouses, the potato fungus that caused the Irish famine, and the

    legal definition of white chocolate.

     6. Select three interesting historical facts about your recipe or its individual ingredients and gather

    information about these on paper or in a Microsoft Office Word document.

    7. You may also want to use the Web to supplement what you found out from your family about the

    cultural traditions associated with your dish. If so, try the site Food, Culture, and Tradition, which

    has links to many regions and their food customs, or research your specific culture’s or country’s

    customs.

Step 2 Create a flyer of your recipe for your class cookbook

    Software: Microsoft Office Publisher

    What to do: Design a flyer abut your recipe for the class cookbook

    1. Open Office Publisher. Using the sample recipe flyer, create a recipe flyer about your dish. This flyer will

    be added to the class cookbook. Your flyer should include:

    ; The recipe from your family

    ; How the recipe or dish is important in your culture. For example, does this recipe tie you to your

    grandparents’ or parents’ country of origin? Does it represent a larger community that you belong

    to or a region you are associated with, for example, the southern United States. Do you eat this

    dish only on a certain day of the year, for example New Year’s Day, a particular national holiday, or

    a special religious celebration like Chanukah, a Saint’s Day, or Eid? If so, is there a cultural story or

    reason associated with why you eat this dish on this day? For example, southerners in the United

    States, following an African tradition, eat small legumes and greens on New Year’s Day to signify

    hope for prosperity in the coming year.

    ; How the recipe or dish is important to your family. What traditions surround this recipe? Who in

    your family is famous for this recipe? When did your family first start making and eating this recipe?

    ; Why you like the recipe. Try to explain how the combination of ingredients is pleasing to you.

    ; Three historical notes about your recipe or its ingredients.

    2. Proofread your flyer and correct any spelling or grammatical errors.

    3. Do a design check on your flyer. Is all the information legible? Attractively presented? Make any visual

    adjustments necessary

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