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polk - Texas Department of State Health Services

By Gail Hart,2014-07-17 08:28
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polk - Texas Department of State Health Services

    Polk County

    POTENTIALLY PREVENTABLE HOSPITALIZATIONS

    www.dshs.state.tx.us/ph

From 2005-2010, adult residents (18+) of Polk County received $203,944,911 in charges for hospitalizations that were potentially

    preventable. Hospitalizations for the conditions below are called “potentially preventable,” because if the individual had access to and cooperated with appropriate outpatient healthcare, the hospitalization would likely not have occurred.

Potentially Preventable Number of Hospitalizations 2005-2010

    Hospitalizations for Adult 2005-2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Average Hospital Hospital Charges Residents of Polk County 2010 Hospital Charges Divided by 2010

    Charge Adult County

    Population Bacterial Pneumonia 248 195 218 204 192 161 1,218 $42,627 $51,920,040 $1,449 Dehydration 59 56 40 45 44 27 271 $21,306 $5,774,033 $161 Urinary Tract Infection 186 181 149 149 150 141 956 $29,299 $28,010,298 $782 Angina (without procedures) 21 13 11 0 6 6 57 $20,935 $1,193,288 $33 Congestive Heart Failure 285 247 213 246 215 215 1,421 $35,922 $51,044,716 $1,424 Hypertension (High Blood 33 37 24 30 21 35 180 $20,479 $3,686,245 $103 Pressure)

    Asthma 31 40 37 57 36 31 232 $29,887 $6,933,731 $193 Chronic Obstructive 238 189 190 187 166 157 1,127 $32,924 $37,105,803 $1,035 Pulmonary Disease

    Diabetes Short-term 15 13 19 18 16 31 112 $28,136 $3,151,256 $88 Complications

    Diabetes Long-term 57 42 49 50 61 72 331 $45,696 $15,125,500 $422 Complications

    TOTAL 1,173 1,013 950 986 907 876 5,905 $34,538 $203,944,911 $5,691 Source: Center for Health Statistics, Texas Department of State Health Services

The purpose of this information is to assist in improving healthcare and reducing healthcare costs.

    This information is not an evaluation of hospitals or other healthcare providers.

    Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations (2005-2010) (03/28/12) 1

    Bacterial Pneumonia is a serious inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Bacterial pneumonia primarily impacts older adults. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging older adults and other high risk individuals to get vaccinated for bacterial

    pneumonia.

    Dehydration means the body does not have enough fluid to function well. Dehydration primarily impacts older adults or institutionalized individuals who have a limited ability to communicate thirst. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging attention to the fluid status of individuals at risk.

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is usually caused when bacteria enter the bladder and cause inflammation and infection. It is a common condition, with older adults at highest risk. In most cases, an uncomplicated UTI can be treated with proper antibiotics. Communities can potentially prevent

    hospitalizations by encouraging individuals to practice good personal hygiene; drink plenty of fluids; and (if practical) avoid conducting urine cultures

    in asymptomatic patients who have indwelling urethral catheters.

    Angina (without procedures) is chest pain that occurs when a blockage of a coronary artery prevents sufficient oxygen-rich blood from reaching

    the heart muscle. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging regular physical activity; smoking cessation; controlling diabetes, high blood pressure, and abnormal cholesterol; maintaining appropriate body weight; and daily administration of an anti-platelet

    medication (like low dose aspirin) in most individuals with known coronary artery disease.

    Congestive Heart Failure is the inability of the heart muscle to function well enough to meet the demands of the rest of the body. Communities

    can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging individuals to reduce risk factors such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, alcohol abuse, and use of illegal drugs.

    Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) is a syndrome with multiple causes. Hypertension is often controllable with medications. Communities can

    potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging an increased level of aerobic physical activity, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting the

    consumption of alcohol to moderate levels for those who drink, reducing salt and sodium intake, and eating a reduced-fat diet high in fruits,

    vegetables, and low-fat dairy food.

    Asthma occurs when air passages of the lungs become inflamed and narrowed and breathing becomes difficult. Asthma is treatable, and most

    flare-ups and deaths can be prevented through the use of medications. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging people to learn how to recognize particular warning signs of asthma attacks. Treating symptoms early can result in prevented or less severe

    attacks.

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is characterized by decreased flow in the airways of the lungs. It consists of three related diseases: asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Because existing medications cannot change the progressive decline in lung function, the goal of

    medications is to lessen symptoms and/or decrease complications. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging education on smoking cessation and minimizing shortness of breath.

    Diabetes Short-term Complications are extreme fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Extreme dizziness and fainting can indicate hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), and if not brought under control, seizures, shock or coma can occur. Diabetics need to monitor

    their blood sugar levels carefully and adjust their diet and/or medications accordingly. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging the regular monitoring and managing of diabetes in the outpatient health care setting and encouraging patient compliance with

    treatment plans.

    Diabetes Long-term Complications include risk of developing damage to the eyes, kidneys and nerves. Risk also includes developing cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. Long-term diabetes complications are thought to result from long-term poor control of diabetes. Communities can potentially prevent hospitalizations by encouraging the regular monitoring and managing of diabetes in the outpatient health care setting and encouraging patient compliance with treatment plans.

For more information on potentially preventable hospitalizations, go to: www.dshs.state.tx.us/ph.

    Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations (2005-2010) (03/28/12) 2

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