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South Mountain Community College Technology Master Plan

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South Mountain Community College Technology Master Plan

    South Mountain Community College

    Technology Master Plan

    An Annually Updated Technology Planning Process:

    ; 7-year Budget Forecast

    ; 3-year “Rolling” Strategic Plan

    ; 18-month Activity Plan

Plan Period: January 1, 2007 June 30, 2008

    Table of Contents I. How to Use This Document...................................................................................... 2 II. Executive Summary: 2005-2006 Technology Master Plan ....................................... 3 III. Introduction ........................................................................................................... 4 A. Purpose and Underlying Philosophy of the Plan................................................... 5 B. History and Participants in South Mountain Technology Planning ........................ 5

    1. The SMCC Information Technology Plan (1999-2002) ..................................... 6

    2. The SMCC Technology Master Plan (2003 and beyond) .................................. 7 IV. The Technology Master Planning Process ........................................................... 8 A. Process Overview ................................................................................................. 8 B. Process Flow ........................................................................................................ 8

    1. Goal Alignment ............................................................................................... 10

    2. Seven-year Technology Budget Forecast ....................................................... 10

    3. Three-year Rolling Strategic Plan ................................................................... 10

    4. Eighteen-month Activity Plan .......................................................................... 11 V. Technology Master Plan Primary Documents ........................................................ 12 A. Technology Vision Statement (TM1-1) ............................................................... 12 B. Technology Goals Listed by Year (TM1-3) ......................................................... 13 C. Technology Planning Guidelines (TM2-3) ....................................................... 14

    1. Planning Priorities (TM2-3.1) .......................................................................... 14

    2. Operational Minimums, Targets and Maximums (TM2-3.2) ............................ 16

    3. Hardware Replacement Guidelines (TM2-3.3) ................................................ 18 D. Seven-year Budget Needs Forecast (TM2-4) ................................................. 19 E. Three-year “Rolling” Goals & Objectives (TM3-1) ............................................... 20 F. 18-month Technology Activity Plan (TM4-1) ....................................................... 21 VI. Technology Master Plan Supporting Documents ................................................ 22 A. South Mountain Operational Goals (TM1-2) ....................................................... 22 B. Long Range Technology Services Plan (TM2-1) ................................................ 22 C. Aged Technology Inventory Report (TM2-2) ................................................... 23 D. One Fiscal Year Purchasing Plan (TM4-2)...................................................... 24 VII. Appendices ......................................................................................................... 25 A. SMCC 12-year Technology Bond Planning Schedule ........................................ 25 B. SMCC 2-4-6 Technology Upgrade Plan ............................................................. 29

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I. How to Use This Document

    The Technology Master Plan consists of several sections, each with a specific purpose.

    How to Use This Document: Outlines layout of the various sections of the Technology Master Plan document. Since this plan was designed to be very practical, this section concludes with simple instructions on how to use this plan is most effectively used. Executive Summary: Key trends, new directions, major projects and spending items that characterize the plan period for this version of the plan (annually updated). Read this section if you want to get a very high level snapshot of the major directions for a

    given fiscal year.

    Introduction: Specifies the purpose, underlying philosophy, participants and a brief history of the Technology Master Plan.

    The Technology Master Planning Process: Defines the planning process itself, the

    inputs to the process and its outputs. Defining the process explains how this process is guided by district, college and learner needs, and how it in turn clarifies, specifies, budgets and schedules responses to identified needs.

    Primary Documents: Key documents which summarize the year’s plan. This section

    is written for two audiences: college leaders who want to understand the overall direction, and those responsible for implementing the plan. These documents include a vision statement, goals, planning assumptions, a long-range budget forecast, medium range goals, and short-range activity plan.

    Supporting Documents: Documents primarily written to guide those responsible for implementing the plan, including operational goals, a long-range services plan, an analysis of current inventory, and spending plans.

    Appendices: Various documents pertinent to the current year’s plan.

    If you are a college leader and desire to understand the essence of this year’s technology plan, please read the “Executive Summary” and scan the “Primary Documents” section. If you are a faculty or staff member, or are interested in specific projects, look for them in the “Three-year Goals & Objectives” (Primary Documents). If

    you are an implementer of the plan, be sure to understand the “One-year Technology

    Activity Plan” (Primary) and the timelines found in the “Planning Process” section.

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    II. Executive Summary: 2007-2008 Technology Master Plan South Mountain is now entering its third master planning period under which proceeds from the Maricopa County Community College District 2004 General Obligation Bond issuance are available to colleges. To facilitate planning for bond-related expenditures, a 12-year planning document known as the “SMCC 12-year Technology Bond Planning

    Schedule” has been added to the Technology Master Plan (see Appendix A) from which is drawn the Technology Master Plan’s 7-year Budget Forecast primary document.

    According to the Technology Master Plan, about $493,000 in bond funding is scheduled to be expended in this current plan period. These funds are planned to be expended roughly as follows:

    ; Replace and upgrade existing technology equipment $515,000

    ; Construction-related technology projects $437,000

    ; Other approved technology projects $120,000

    In this third year of the bond, slightly more funds are scheduled for expenditure for replacement of existing equipment than in each of the next two years, due to the need to replace the last of a “bubble” of new construction equipment purchases purchased in 2001 and 2002.

    The expansion of the Guadalupe Campus will require the outlay of a large amount of bond-related technology spending during the current plan period.

    The College Technology Committee and College Technology Services have updated and simplified the “2-4-6 Technology Upgrade Plan” and changed the name to the

    “Technology Replacement Plan.” This document has been added as Appendix B of the

    Technology Master Plan. The SMCC Technology Replacement Plan is a natural result of the Tech Master Plan’s 7-year Tech Needs Forecasting process. It was designed to optimize SMCC technology funds and to guarantee:

    ; “High-end” classroom computers will be less than 2 years old.

    ; Every classroom computer will be less than 4 years old.

    ; Employee computers will be less than 6 years old.

Other technology trends evident in the current plan period include a focus on “Learning

    Spaces Design” (as the College Technology Committee prepares for participation in bond-related construction specification); support for the New Student Information System rollout; and building database and network infrastructure for future projects.

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III. Introduction

    The aim of South Mountain College expressed in its mission statement is “to provide quality higher education for our diverse community” and to create a caring teaching and

    learning environment that fosters student development and supports productive citizenship in an increasingly global and technological society.” It’s with this mission in mind, that the South Mountain Technology Committee designed a technology planning process that responds to “diverse” community needs by predicting long-range financial

    needs, while remaining flexible enough to allow innovation.

    There were a few key design goals and improvements suggested by college leadership, which guided the revision efforts to the previous Information Technology Plan:

    ; Create a multi-year, updateable technology plan, which accurately projects and

    manages the tremendous costs associated with instructional technology.

    ; Link activities to goals so justifications for technology efforts are clearly defined.

    ; Tie technology goals and objectives to the budgeting processes.

    ; Clearly define responsibilities, timelines and resource allocations required to

    implement the plan.

    ; Make the plan responsive to learner, faculty and staff needs.

    College Technology Committee members and other participants who have contributed to the development of this latest version of South Mountain’s technology plan, hope that most of these design goals have been met in this plan. The authors have endeavored to design a simple and very functional process. But since the design goals are complex and interrelated, the authors fully expect that this plan to be revised on an annual basis. The authors and the College Technology Committee are committed to the continued improvement of this plan, so please make your comments and suggestions known by sending e-mail to Mike.Lewis@SMCmail.Maricopa.edu.

    In addition to the design criteria for the revised technology plan mentioned above, the Technology Committee desired to design a process which was truly practical, forward-looking, fiscally responsible yet not overly constrained, aware of possible problems, and a “servant” to other strategic planning processes. The committee felt that the best measure of whether the new plan was effectively meeting college needs was to determine whether it was aligned with the strategic plans guiding the college. Therefore, the Technology Master Plan’s proper role is to interpret other plans, and the committee’s role is to validate the trueness of this interpretation.

    Before going further, it is important to carefully distinguish between a process, and the outputs of that process. Since this document addresses both the planning process and its outputs, both are described herein. This “Introduction” and section IV which follows it, describe the planning process, while the outputs of the process are discussed in sections V and VI. The foundational principles underlying the planning process itself

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    are discussed here, while the foundational principles guiding the implementation of technology are covered in section V in the “Technology Planning Guidelines” document.

    A. Purpose and Underlying Philosophy of the Plan

    The South Mountain Community College Technology Master Plan is, first of all, a self-evolving process as much as it is a plan. The Technology Master Plan is

    evolving in that it is the descendent of the South Mountain College Information Technology Plan (also known as the “Ocotillo Plan”), developed in 1999. It is a process in that it fundamentally defines a process for defining and meeting technology needs. And it is self-evolving in that it contains within itself a

    methodology for improving the process it describes.

    A second fundamental characteristic of the South Mountain College Technology Master Plan is that it is a subordinate plan to other strategic plans. Just as

    Maricopa County Community College District would have no purpose if it weren’t for its community of learners, the Technology Master Plan would have no purpose if not for the other strategic plans it serves. Technology is seen as a “tool” of the learning process, not an end in itself. Therefore, the Technology Master Plan is simply a way to provide learners with the tools they need, in accordance with district and college strategic plans.

    Finally, the Technology Master Plan is a master plan in the sense of its scope, both

    in its purpose and its timeline. The Technology Master Plan’s purpose is broad, in that it attempts to rationalize the requirements of the various strategic plans it serves, while operating within budget and time constraints. Its timeline is also broad, because the high cost of technology demands long-range planning. This plan attempts to broadly predict technology costs a full seven years in advance. The two-fold philosophy underlying the plan is deceivingly simple: (1) address

    essential needs first, and then, as resources allow, extend to other priority areas; and (2) always hold some resources in reserve to permit for innovation and unexpected

    events.

    B. History and Participants in South Mountain Technology Planning

    The South Mountain College Technology Master Plan was the result of almost two years of development, with input from a variety of sources ranging from the areas of instructional, student, and campus services to students, faculty, staff, and administration. The South Mountain College Technology Committee is the key body responsible for facilitating the plan’s development. Before delving into the plan itself, it is important to understand the historical context of this plan. This section addresses the history of technology planning at South Mountain College. On May 15, 1999, the SMCC Technology Committee completed its first extensive, formal technology plan, known as the “SMCC Information Technology Plan” or more familiarly as the “Ocotillo Technology Plan.” After almost two years of effort, this technology plan was published on the South Mountain web site, and submitted to District representatives for review as part of a larger district-led bond planning process.

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    This first, formal technology plan was the work of many contributors across all areas of South Mountain College. Faculty members on the Technology Committee led the effort to develop this plan, which included planning assumptions, goals, objectives and activities, covering from one to five years. It also contained five-year cost projections for replacing technology assets, and sub-plans for developing newly constructed facilities, for technology asset reallocation/retirement, and for upgrading existing instructional facilities.

    The SMCC Information Technology Plan was the foundational document guiding South Mountain’s technology growth from 1999 through 2002. But, in order to more closely tie technology planning to the budget process, expand the planning horizon to seven years, schedule technology development activities better, and respond more agilely to instructional technology needs, a major revision of the Information Technology Plan was begun in the spring of 2001. This new plan, known as the “South Mountain College Technology Master Plan” is the subject of this document. The Technology Master Plan is plan is more comprehensive than the first plan and was the work of faculty, administration and staff who make up the Technology Committee.

    1. The SMCC Information Technology Plan (1999-2002)

    Like many colleges, South Mountain accomplished technology planning through the 1980’s and well into the 1990’s by participating in the college-wide strategic

    planning process, participating in district-wide technology initiatives, and by accomplishing one-year departmental goals and objectives. The first formal technology plan was completed on May 15, 1999, and is known as “SMCC Information Technology Plan.”

    Understanding the alternative name for the SMCC Information Technology Plan is key to understanding this plan’s origin and its dual roles. The SMCC Information

    Technology Plan is also known as the “Ocotillo Technology Plan” because faculty and staff comprising the “Ocotillo Instructional Technology Committee” were key contributors. The plan was initiated in 1997 at the bequest of Maricopa Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Alfredo de los Santos (who also headed the Ocotillo Forum), as part of a district-wide bond planning initiative. Each college’s

    Ocotillo Committee was asked to create a college plan so that the combined plans would reflect district-wide technology requirements arising from teaching and learning needs.

    The SMCC Ocotillo Plan served a second role at South Mountain Community College, because college leadership desired to address instructional as well as administrative technology needs in a single plan. Thus, at South Mountain, the Technology Committee joined with the Ocotillo Committee, and produced a single comprehensive, college-wide technology plan—the “SMCC Information

    Technology/Ocotillo Plan.”

    The process of developing the college plan began in late 1997 by the Dean of Instruction and the Ocotillo Chair. Over the next year, the Ocotillo Committee evaluated other college technology plans, sought faculty input, brainstormed at Ocotillo Retreats and planning sessions, and in other ways formulated ideas and an preliminary outline for the plan. In early 1999, the plan was taken to a wider

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    audience as an Ocotillo subcommittee of mostly faculty members was formed to work on the plan. At that time, the newly hired Director of College Technology and the College Technology Committee were asked to join the planning effort to ensure the plan addressed campus-wide constituencies and needs. Finally, in May of 1999 the plan was approved by the combined Ocotillo and College Technology Committees, and submitted to the Vice Chancellor’s office.

    The SMCC Information Technology Plan was used for guiding Technology Committee short and medium range planning efforts, including capital purchase recommendations. This plan also served as the basis for the development of a revised plan, which will be covered in the next section. The SMCC Information Technology Plan core document contains planning assumptions, goals, objectives and activities spanning a time frame from one to five years. It describes a technology asset reallocation/retirement plan that has served as an action plan for the movement of computers from purchase to retirement. The Plan also contains a five-year cost projection for replacing technology assets through 2005 based upon an aged inventory of technology equipment, which has required revising annually. Finally, it contains an “Instructional Technology Readiness Survey” which has been the basis of all classroom upgrade projects and reports since 1999. Please refer to the attached document for further information. 2. The SMCC Technology Master Plan (2003 and beyond)

    Shortly after the Technology Committee began implementing the SMCC Information Technology Plan, an effort was initiated to layout the committee’s planning calendar on an annual basis, which in turn required a more structured technology planning process. At the same time, South Mountain’s Dean of Student and Administrative Services asked the Director of College Technology to seek a way to more closely tie technology purchases to the capital budget planning process. These needs coupled with the desire to improve the SMCC IT Plan in several other areas, resulted in a decision in the spring of 2001 by Technology Committee chair to undertake a revision of the existing technology plan.

    This revised plan was named the “South Mountain Technology Master Plan.” This new plan (i.e. this document) was completed in the spring of 2002, and replaces the SMCC Information Technology Plan on January 1, 2003 as the operative college plan.

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IV. The Technology Master Planning Process

    Understanding the Technology Master Planning process is essential to grasping the implementation of that process. In this section, the planning process is explained in order to better understand the documents output by this process, and so participants in the process may understand their roles and responsibilities.

    A. Process Overview

    The SMCC Technology Master Plan defines a process for gathering input, weighing alternatives, reaching consensus, identifying short term and long-term action recommendations, implementing and monitoring recommendations, and modifying the process itself through annual feedback.

    The planning process has four phases: (1) Goal Alignment, (2) 7-year Budget Forecast, (3) a 3-year Rolling Strategic Plan, and (4) an 18-month Activity Plan (Figure IV-1). All the documents output in the planning process and all sub-processes are related to these four phases, so it’s important first to understand the whole process at a high level.

    SMCC Technology Master Planning Process(Figure IV-1)Technology Goals & Objectives3SEM Plan input(3-year rolling strategic plan)u(smmer) Goal Alignment: MCCD, SMCC & Dept/Division1Evaluate allTechnologyActivities forMCCDSMCCFaculty InputTC ranked, VisionprerequisitesSASPla nMission VisioniyReview prelminarsequencedStatement(summer)(summer)Statement Pf1-year lan (all)then calendaredTM1-1Technology Goals & ObjectivesTC Cost/(Sept)3BenefitSMCC Goal Alignment: MCCD, SMCC & Dept/DivisionMCCD1EvaluationFilter off onlyMaster(3-year rolling strategic plan)SouthStrategicGoals,Tech-relatedGoalsMountainPlanSMCC(Oct)ObjectivesActivitiesDatabaseOperationalTech-relatedCosted, TechMission& ActivitiesGoalsActivities List Activities List(summer)TM1-2OtherMCCDTechnologyMCCDTechReviewed by Leadership CabinetGoalsPlansPlan+ Faculty Senate + StrategicSMCCSMCCSMCCListed by YearSMCCEnrollment Mgt Cmteespring10-yrspringsummerSEMAcademicFacilitiesTM1-3SAS3-year Tech Rolling& fallplanPlanPlanPlanPlan(Oct-Nov)Goals andRanked TechObjectivesActivities ListSMCCTM3-17-year Tech Needs ForecastMaster2Goals ListLong Range18-mo Activity Plans4TechnologyServicesPlanFilter offTM2-1Apply PlanningTechnologynext 18(Dec)Long RangeAssumptions toPlanningmonths ofTight scheduling +Activities ListInventory &18-mo. TechnologyGuidelinesActivitiesresource commitmentsServices PlanActivity Plan/ Dept Goals1. Priorities(Nov)Aged(summer)TM4-12. HW Repl.Tie aged inventory t curentorTechnology7-year Tech Needs Forecast2InventoryGuidelinesnviycnteeds a phsial ivenoryInventoryProgramTM-2-3DatabaseOp Budget based18-mo Activity PlansPreliminary4on Plaed(Jan)n nes18-month TechAged TechnologyActivity Plan7-year Inventory ReportCapital RequestsTech BudgetTM2-2Mr)(aNeeds Forecast1 FY TechLTM2-4Purchasing(Nov)EPlan (cap+op+eofy)GTM4-2END1 FY TechOp Budget ReportTM4-3SourcePrimarySupportIntermediateText-onlyExternalText-onlydocumentFigure IV-1 documentdocumentdocumentdocumentInputdocumentDocuments not in Tech Master PlanTech Master Plan DocumentsExternal Sources

    B. Process Flow

    As was mentioned previously, a key design criterion was that the technology planning process to be very responsive to learner, college and district needsit was to be a

    “servant” to other strategic plans. To accomplish this, the process was designed with

    a number of inputs: three District strategic plans, four college strategic plans, faculty roundtables, leadership review sessions, Technology Committee discussion and review, and the capital request process. These inputs are shown in blue in the following process diagram (Figure IV-2).

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