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Injury and Illness Prevention Program

By Denise Carpenter,2014-11-03 14:22
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Injury and Illness Prevention Program

    Injury and Illness Prevention Program

    Table of Contents

    New Employee Checklist………………………………………………………………………………………….1

    Code of Safe Practices…………………………………………………………………………………………….2

    Behavior……………………………………………………………………………………………………………3

    Roles and Responsibilities & Authority and Accountability……………………………………………………4

    ; Supervisors

    ; Safety Management

    ; Campus Safety Manager

    Injury and Illness Prevention Program…………………………………………………………………………..5

    ; Compliance

    ; Hazard Assessment and Correction

    ; Accident Investigations

    ; Departmental Safety Programs

    ; Communication

    ; Documentation

    Accident Reports…………………………………………………………………………………………………..6

    Witness Statement Form……………………………………………………………………….…………………7

    Laboratory Employee Training Checklist & Hazardous Chemicals ………………………………………….8

    Defensive Driving & Traffic Accident Reporting.………………………………………………...…...………..9

    Ergonomics…………………………………………………….…………………………………………………10

    ; Computer Ergonomic Review Tool……………………………….…….…………………………….11

    ; Eye Protection………………………………………………..…………………………………………12

    ; Hearing Conservation Program…………………………………..………………………………...…13

    Personal Protective Equipment……………………………………………….……….………………………...14

    Emergency First Aid Procedures………………………………………….………….………………………….15

    ; Oxygen Guidelines…………………………………….………….………….………………………….16

    ; Bloodborne Pathogen Control…………………….…………….…………………….………………..17

    ; Contamination Procedures…………………………………………………………..………………....18

    Glossary of Terms………………..………………………………………………………………………………...19

    Safety Inspection Team…………………..………………………………………………………………………...20

    Simpson University Office Safety Inspection………..……………………………………………………………21

    Model Hazard Communication Program………………..……………………………………………………......22

IIPP Forms………………………………..………………….……………………………………………………...23

    ; Accident Investigation

    ; Hazard ID and Correction ; Safety Training Template ; Safety Training Log

    ; Safe Behavioral Reinforcement ; Safety One-on-One Checklist ; Accident Review Council Charter ; Site Inspection Team Charter ; Student Safety Council Charter ; Cal/OSHA Log 300

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    New Employee Training Checklist

    (Record new employee trainings on Safety One-on-One Checklist)

    _______ Explanation of the employer’s IIP Program, Code of Safe Practices, Emergency Action Plan, and measures for reporting any unsafe conditions, work practices, injuries and when additional instruction is needed.

    ________ Use of appropriate clothing, including gloves, footwear, and personal protective equipment.

    ________ Information about chemical hazards to which workers could be exposed and other hazard communication program information.

    ________ Safe work practices and procedures working around or with the following equipment and machinery:

    ________ Safe work practices and procedures working with the following power tools:

    ________ Ergonomic risks, including workstation design, posture, and proper techniques for lifting and carrying materials.

________ Electrical hazards.

    ________ Provisions for medical services and first aid including emergency procedures.

________ Heat stress and heat exhaustion.

________ Other job-specific hazards, such as:

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    CODE OF SAFE PRACTICES

    SIMPSON UNIVERSITY

    It is our policy that everything possible will be done to protect employees, residents,

    and visitors from accidents. Safety is cooperative, and requires participation by every

    employee. Failure by any employee to comply with safety rules will be grounds for

    corrective discipline. Supervisors shall insist that employees observe all applicable

    company, state and federal safety rules and practices and take action as is necessary to

    obtain compliance: To carry out this policy employees shall comply with the following

    regulations and shall report:

    1. All unsafe conditions and equipment to your supervisor or safety coordinator. 2. All incidents, injuries and illnesses to your supervisor or safety coordinator

    immediately.

    3. Anyone known to be under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs, shall not be

    allowed on the job while in that condition.

    4. Horseplay, scuffling, and other acts which tend to have an adverse influence on the

    safety or well-being of the employees is prohibited.

    5. Means of egress shall be kept unblocked, well-lighted and unlocked during work

    hours.

    6. In the event of fire, sound alarm and evacuate.

    7. Upon hearing fire alarm, stop work and proceed to the nearest clear exit. Gather at

    the designated location.

    8. Only trained workers may attempt to respond to a fire or other emergency. 9. Exit doors must comply with fire safety regulations during business hours. 10. Stairways should be kept clear of items that can be tripped over, and all areas under

    stairways that are egress routes should not be used to store combustibles. 11. Materials and equipment will not be stored against doors or exits, fire ladders or fire

    extinguisher stations.

    12. Aisles must be kept clear at all times.

    13. Work areas should be maintained in a neat, orderly manner. Trash and refuse are to

    be thrown in proper waste containers.

    14. All spills shall be wiped up promptly.

    15. Always use the proper lifting technique. Never attempt to lift or push an object which

    is too heavy. Contact your supervisor when help is needed to move a heavy object. 16. Never stack material precariously on top of lockers, file cabinets or other relatively

    high places.

    17. When carrying material, caution should be exercised in watching for and avoiding

    obstructions, loose material, etc.

    18. Do not stack material in an unstable manner.

    19. Report exposed wiring and cords that are frayed or have deteriorated insulation so

    that they can be repaired promptly.

    20. Never use a metal ladder where it could come in contact with energized parts of

    equipment, fixtures or circuit conductors.

    21. Maintain sufficient access and working space around all electrical equipment to

    permit ready and safe operations and maintenance.

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    22. Do not use any portable electrical tools and equipment that are not grounded or

    double insulated.

    23. All electrical equipment should be plugged into appropriate wall receptacles or into

    an extension of only one cord of similar size and capacity. Three-pronged plugs

    should be used to ensure continuity of ground.

    24. All cords running into walk areas must be taped down or inserted through rubber

    protectors to preclude them from becoming tripping hazards.

    25. Motorized vehicles and other mechanized equipment shall be inspected daily or

    prior to use.

    26. Shut off engine, set brakes and block wheels prior to loading or unloading vehicles. 27. Inspect pallets and their loads for integrity and stability before loading or moving. 28. Do not use compressed air for cleaning off clothing.

    29. Do not store compressed gas cylinders in areas which are exposed to heat sources,

    electric arcs or high temperature lines.

    30. Identify contents of pipelines prior to initiating any work that affects the integrity of

    the pipe.

    31. Wear hearing protection in all areas identified as having high noise exposure. 32. Goggles or face shields must be worn when grinding.

    33. Do not use any faulty or worn hand tools.

    34. Guard floor openings by a cover, guardrail, or equivalent.

    35. Do not enter into a confined space unless tests for toxic substances, explosive

    concentrations, and oxygen deficiency have been taken.

    36. Always keep flammable or toxic chemicals in closed containers when not in use. 37. Do not eat in areas where hazardous chemicals are present.

    38. Be aware of the potential hazards involving various chemicals stored or used in the

    workplace.

    39. Cleaning supplies should be stored away from edible items on kitchen shelves. 40. Cleaning solvents and flammable liquids should be stored in appropriate containers. 41. Solutions that may be poisonous or not intended for consumption should be kept in

    well labeled containers.

    42. When working with a VDT, have all pieces of furniture adjusted, positioned and

    arranged to minimize strain on all parts of the body.

    43. Never leave lower desk or cabinet drawers open that present a tripping hazard. Use

    care when opening and closing drawers to avoid pinching fingers.

    44. Do not open more than one upper drawer at a time, particularly the top two drawers

    on tall file cabinets.

    45. Appliances such as coffee pots and microwaves should be kept in working order

    and inspected for signs of wear, heat or fraying of cords.

    46. Fans used in work areas should be guarded. Guards must not allow fingers to be

    inserted through the mesh. Newer fans are equipped with proper guards.

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    Behavior

    Supervisors, Directors, and Vice Presidents should be actively engaged in encouraging safe work behaviors and enforcing safety rules. Oversight and involvement should include daily observation of work behaviors and interaction with employees:

Key behaviors include but are not Actions regarding observed behaviors

    limited to: include:

    1. Body mechanics/lifting 1. Verbal positive reinforcement

    2. Pace of work 2. Safety One-on-One training

    3. Focus 3. Verbal behavior correction

    4. Technique 4. Verbal warning

    5. Following safety rules 5. Written warning

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    Roles and Responsibilities & Authority and Accountability

    (R2A2)

Senior Management Responsibility

Senior Management Responsibility consists of:

     Allocating adequate resources

     Ensuring responsibility

     Reviewing and evaluating results

Department Heads

     Developing policy

     Ensuring responsibility

     Ensuring workplace inspections

     Review supervisors, investigations of accidents and injuries

     Review alleged hazardous conditions to determine the necessary corrective

    actions

     Review and evaluate programs and results

Campus Safety Manager’s Responsibility

The CSM has responsibility for:

     Ensuring that upper management is aware of all accidents which have occurred

    and all hazards which have been identified.

     Maintaining company’s Injury Illness Prevention Program.

     Assist in the development of policies and in the coordination of required health

    and safety training.

     Serving as a liaison with government agencies.

     Maintaining current information on local, state and federal health regulations.

     Arranging safety and health inspections and following up to ensure that the

    necessary corrective action is completed.

     Accident investigation

     Maintaining records of inspection, hazard abatement, training and OHSA

    required paperwork.

     Reviewing injury and illness trends

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Supervisors

    Supervisors play a key role in the implementation of safety. Supervisors are responsible for:

     Developing proper attitude toward safety and health in themselves and in those

    they supervise, and for ensuring that all operations are performed with the utmost

    regard for the safety and health of all personnel involved.

     Ensuring periodic, documented inspections of workspaces under their authority.

     Promptly correcting identified hazards.

     Providing appropriate safety training and personal protective equipment.

     Implementing measures to eliminate or control workplace hazards.

     Stopping any employee’s work that poses an imminent hazard to either the

    employee or any other individual.

     Maintaining all required paperwork.

    It is the responsibility of all employees to comply with all applicable health and safety regulations, company policy and established work practices. This includes but is not limited to:

     Maintaining a safe work environment.

     Learning about the potential hazard of assigned tasks and work areas.

     Following all safe operating procedures and precautions.

     Using proper personal protective equipment.

     Warning coworkers about defective equipment and other hazards.

     Reporting unsafe conditions immediately to a supervisor, and stopping work if an

    imminent hazard is present.

     Participating in workplace safety inspections.

     Observing health and safety related signs, posters, warning signals and

    directions.

     Participating in health and safety training provided by the company.

SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    The Campus Safety department is the Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) administrator and has the authority and responsibility to implement the provisions of this program for Simpson University. All members of management are responsible for safety and health in the workplace. All managers and supervisors are responsible for implementing and maintaining the IIPP in their work areas and for answering employee questions about the program. A copy of this IIPP is given to each manager and supervisor.

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    Responsibilities of the Campus Safety department are:

; Set policy.

    ; Assign responsibility and accountability to individuals.

    ; Review and evaluate results.

    ; Provide leadership by participation, example, and a demonstrated interest in the

    program.

    CAMPUS SAFETY MANAGER

    The Campus Safety Manager’s responsibilities are:

    ; Work with departments to develop and maintain the Injury and Illness Prevention

    Program (IIPP).

    ; Act in advisory capacity to Simpson staff on matters relating to the IIPP. ; Oversee investigations, losses, accidents and incidents.

    ; Obtain and publish University safety statistics.

    ; Provide leadership and direction, stimulate interest in safety, and coordinate the

    Accident Review Committee (ARC) and the Safety Inspection Team (SIT)

    activities.

    ; Establish procedures, receive and process accident and safety reports from

    departments, ARC, or SIT.

    ; Provide assistance to departments with their safety programs and facilitate

    appropriate University-wide training programs.

    ; Act in advisory capacity to supervisors to mitigate unsafe work conditions and

    practices.

    ; Arrange for periodic safety inspections of University operations and facilities and

    work with department directors to implement corrective action as required. ; Assist departments to inform employees of safety standards and enforce safety

    rules.

    ; Oversee departmental safety programs.

    ; Ensure that all accidents are reported, investigated, and acted upon.

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    SIMPSON UNIVERSITY

    INJURY AND ILLNESS PREVENTION PROGRAM (IIPP)

    INTRODUCTION

    In order to maintain a safe and healthy work environment at Simpson University, the Office of Campus Safety has developed this overall Injury and Illness

    Prevention Program for all employees to follow. This document describes the goals, statutory authority, and the responsibilities of all employees and students under the Program. It addresses compliance, hazard identification, accident investigation, hazard mitigation, training, hazard communication, and program documentation. By making employee safety a high priority for every Simpson employee we can reduce injuries and illnesses, increase productivity, and promote a safer and healthier environment for all individuals at Simpson University.

    GOALS

    Diligent implementation of this program will reap many benefits for Simpson University. Most notably it will:

    1. Protect the health and safety of employees. Decrease the potential

    risk of disease, illness, injury and harmful exposures to Simpson

    University personnel.

    2. Reduce workers’ compensation claims and costs.

    3. Improve efficiency by reducing the time spent replacing or

    reassigning injured employees, as well as reduce the need to find

    and train replacement employees.

    4. Improve employee morale and efficiency as employees see that

    their safety is important to management.

    5. Minimize the potential for penalties assessed by various

    enforcement agencies by maintaining compliance with health and

    safety codes.

    STATUTORY AUTHORITY

California Labor Code Section 6401.7.

    California Code of Regulations Title 8, Sections 1509 and 3203.

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