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Supplemental SPSS Exercises

By Denise Richardson,2014-01-10 22:19
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Supplemental SPSS Exercises

CHAPTER 14. ORDINAL MEASURES OF ASSOCIATION

    14.1 This exercise is based on Demonstration 14.1. Load the 1972 GSS data set and use the Recode (SPSS) or Collapse Variables (MicroCase) command to recode age into three categories

    of approximately equal size. Run the Frequencies (SPSS) or Univariate (MicroCase) program for

    age to find appropriate cutting points. (SPSS: Don’t forget to recode “into different variable”). Give recoded age a new name. Run Crosstabs (SPSS) or Cross-tabulation (MicroCase) with

    premarsx as the dependent variable (in the rows) and recoded age as the independent variable (in

    the columns). Get column percentages and gamma and use this information to assess the strength and direction of the relationship. Compare the 1972 results with those from 1998 generated in Demonstration 14.1 and write up your conclusions.

    14.2 What effect does level of education have (if any) on attitudes towards controversial issues? Load the supplementary 1998 GSS data set (gss98supp) and run Crosstabs (SPSS) or Cross-

    tabulation (MicroCase) with degree as the independent variable (in the columns) and three to

    five variables of your own choosing as the dependent (row) variables. The data set includes measures of opinions about abortion, affirmative action, gender roles, civil liberties, birth control, school prayer and racial prejudice. Get column percentages and gamma and use this information to assess the strength and direction of the relationships and write up your conclusions. Is there a relationship between education and opinion?

    14.3a. Is there a relationship between birth rate and infant mortality rate? Do nations with higher rates of birth also tend to have higher death rates for infants? Load the World data set and use the Recode (SPSS) or Collapse Variables (MicroCase) command to recode birthrat (birth rate) and

    infmort (infant mortality rate) into three categories of approximately equal size. Run the Frequencies (SPSS) or Univariate (MicroCase) program to find appropriate cutting points.

    (SPSS: Don’t forget to recode “into different variable”). Give both variables new names. Run Crosstabs (SPSS) or Cross-tabulation (MicroCase) with recoded infmort as the dependent

    variable (in the rows) and recoded birthrat as the independent variable (in the columns). Get

    column percentages and gamma and use this information to assess the strength and direction of the relationship.

     b. What is the relationship between life expectancy and level of economic development? Run Crosstabs (SPSS) or Cross-tabulation (MicroCase) with lifeexpc (life expectancy) as dependent

    variables (in the rows) and econdev as the independent variable (in the columns). Get column

    percentages and gamma and use this information to assess the strength and direction of the relationship.

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    The exercises should be attempted only after completing those in the textbook. They parallel the demonstrations in the text and include some exercises that students may conduct independently.

    The exercises can be completed with either SPSS for Windows or MicroCase, and the supplemental data sets are available here at the web site for this text or as a part of the SPSS Student Version CDROM that is available for bundling with this edition. Code libraries for each data set are included in this booklet. The data sets are:

1. GSS72: The General Social Survey (GSS) for 1972. This is the first year for the survey and

    will This booklet contains additional data analysis exercises for Statistics: A Tool for Social

    permit students to make comparisons with the 1998 GSS included with the text.

2. GSS98-supp: The General Social Survey (GSS) for 1998. Variables from the 1998 GSS in

    addition to those included with the data set used in the text.

3. Nations of the world: The World Data Set. 42 variables for 174 nations. Emphasis on

    demographic variables.

    4. States: The States Data Set. 46 variables for the 50 states. The variables include measures of crime, demographics, and voting patterns.

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