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Ideas for home activities related to learning multiplication facts

By Louis Matthews,2014-07-01 01:31
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Ideas for home activities related to learning multiplication facts

    Ideas for home activities related to learning multiplication facts

Y3

    Bean race

    You need two dice and a pile of dried beans.

     Take turns to roll the two dice.

     Multiply the two numbers and call out the answer.

     If you are right, you win a bean.

     The first to get 10 beans wins.

Bingo!

    One person has the 2x table and the other has the 5x table. Write six numbers in that table on your piece of paper, e.g.

    4 8 10 16 18 20

     Roll one or two dice. If you choose to roll two dice, add the numbers, e.g. roll

    two dice, get 3 and 4, add these to make 7.

     Multiply that number by 2 or by 5 (that is, by your table number, e.g. 7 x 2

    or 7 x 5).

     If the answer is on your paper, cross it out.

     The first to cross out all six of their numbers wins.

Y4

    Tables

    Practise the 3x, 4x and 5x tables. Say them forwards and backwards. Ask your child questions like:

    What are five threes? What is 15 divided by 5?

    Seven times three? How many threes in 21?

Number game 2

     Put some dominoes face down.

     Shuffle them.

     Each choose a domino.

     Multiply the two numbers on your domino.

     Whoever has the biggest answer keeps the two dominoes. The winner is the person with the most dominoes when they have all

    been used.

Dicey division

    You each need a piece of paper. Each of you should choose five numbers from the list below and write them on your paper.

5 6 8 9 12 15 20 30 40 50

     Take turns to roll a dice. If the number you roll divides exactly into

    one of your numbers, then cross it out, e.g. you roll a 4, it goes into 8,

    cross out 8.

     If you roll a 1, miss that go. If you roll a 6 have an extra go. The first to cross out all five of their numbers wins.

All the sixes

    Time your child while he / she does one or more of these. Count in sixes to 60.

     Count back in sixes from 60 to zero.

     Start with 4. Count on in sixes to 70.

     Start with 69. Count back in sixes to 3.

    Next week, try to beat the record.

Left overs

     Take turns to choose a two-digit number less than 50. Write it down. Now count up to it in fours. What number is

    left over?

     The number left is the number of points you score, e.g.

    Choose 27.

    Count: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24.

    3 left over to get to 27.

    So you score 3 points.

     The first person to get 12 or more points wins. Now try the same game counting in threes, or in fives. Can you spot which numbers will score you points?

Y5

Times tables

    Say together the six times table forwards, then backwards. Ask your child questions, such as:

    Nine sixes? How many sixes in 42?

    Six times four? Forty-eight divided by six?

    Three multiplied by six? Six times what equals sixty? Repeat with the seven, eight and nine times tables.

Tables

    Make a times-table grid like this.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

    3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30

    4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40

    5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

    6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

    7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 70

    8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80

    9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 90

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

     Shade in all the tables facts that your child knows, probably the 1s, 2s, 3s,

    4s, 5s and 10s.

     Some facts appear twice, e.g. 7 x 3 and 3 x 7, so cross out one of each. Are you surprised how few facts are left?

     There might only be 10 facts to learn. So take one fact a day and make up a

    silly rhyme together to help your child to learn it,

    e.g. nine sevens are sixty-three, let's have lots of chips for tea!

Times tables

    Say together the six times table forwards, then backwards. Ask your child questions, such as:

    Nine sixes? How many sixes in 42?

    Six times four? Forty-eight divided by six?

    Three multiplied by six? Six times what equals sixty? Repeat with the seven, eight and nine times tables.

Tables

    Make a times-table grid like this.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

    2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

    3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30

    4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40

    5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50

    6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60

    7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 70

    8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80

    9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 90

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Shade in all the tables facts that your child knows, probably the 1s, 2s, 3s,

    4s, 5s and 10s.

     Some facts appear twice, e.g. 7 x 3 and 3 x 7, so cross out one of each.

     Are you surprised how few facts are left?

     There might only be 10 facts to learn. So take one fact a day and make up a

    silly rhyme together to help your child to learn it,

    e.g. nine sevens are sixty-three, let's have lots of chips for tea!

Times tables

    Ask your child a different times-table fact every day, e.g. What is 6 times 8? Can you use this to work out 12 x 8? and: What is 48 divided by 6?

Y6

    Four in a line

    Draw a 6 x 7 grid.

    Fill it with numbers under 100.

26 54 47 21 19 5 38

    9 25 67 56 31 49 13

    39 41 6 1 75 28 90

    14 50 81 23 43 4 37

    45 29 72 34 7 58 17

    36 2 55 11 22 40 42

Take turns.

     Roll three dice, or roll one dice three times.

     Use all three numbers to make a number on the grid. You can add, subtract, multiply or divide the numbers,

    e.g. if you roll 3, 4 and 5, you could make 3 x 4 5 = 7,

    54 ? 3 = 18, (4 + 5) x 3 = 27, and so on. Cover the number you make with a coin or counter. The first to get four of their counters in a straight line wins.

Rhymes

    Make up rhymes together to help your child to remember the harder times-

    tables facts, e.g.

    6 x 7 = 42 phew! 7 x 7 = 49 fine! 6 x 8 = 48 great!

    Card game

    Use a pack of playing cards.

    Take out the jacks, queens and kings.

Take turns.

     Take a card and roll a dice.

     Multiply the two numbers.

     Write down the answer. Keep a running total. The first to go over 301 wins!

Remainders

    Draw a 6 x 6 grid like this.

82 33 60 11 73 22

    65 12 74 28 93 51

    37 94 57 13 66 38

    19 67 76 41 75 85

    86 29 68 58 20 46

    50 69 30 78 59 10

Choose the 7, 8 or 9 times table.

     Take turns.

Roll a dice.

     Choose a number on the board, e.g. 59. Divide it by the tables number,

    e.g. 7. If the remainder for 59 ? 7 is the same as the dice number, you

    can cover the board number with a counter or coin.

     The first to get four of their counters in a straight line wins!

Doubles and trebles

     Roll two dice.

     Multiply the two numbers to get your score.

     Roll one of the dice again. If it is an even number, double your score.

    If it is an odd number, treble your score.

     Keep a running total of your score.

     The first to get over 301 wins.

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