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3. AFC Corrections and Supportive Services Initiative - Lycos

By Dustin Rogers,2014-12-05 06:27
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3. AFC Corrections and Supportive Services Initiative - Lycos

    Chicago Police Headquarters

    3510 South Michigan Avenue

    September 24, 2009

    Submitted to:

    The Corporation for Supportive Housing

    Submitted by:

    Reentry Housing Taskforce of Chicago

    Table of Contents

Foreword: A note on St. Leonard’s House

    1. Executive Summary and Recommendations………………………………………………..........4 2. The AIDS Foundation of Chicago (AFC)’s Wraparound Approach............................... 7

    3. AFC Corrections and Supportive Services Initiative…………………................................ 8 4. Re-entry Access Project……………………………….…………………………………….................. 9

    5. The 24-Hour Initiative…………………………………………………………………….…………….. 10 6. PEERSpeak Corrections Module………………………………………………..………………..…. 11 7. Re-entry Housing Plan Taskforce………………………………………..…………………………. 12 8. Advocacy for Condoms in Prison…………………………………………………………………… 13 9. Reentry Community Liaison Work……………………………………….………………………... 14 10. AFC Re-entry Housing for Health Partnership………………………….………………….. …15 11. AFC Re-entry Housing for Health Partnership-Program Model and Flow………… 17 12. RHHP Flow Chart………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21 13. Re-entry Housing and Support for Chicago’s Ex-Offenders……………………………… 22 14. St. Leonard’s Ministries…………………………………………………………………………………. 23 15. Summary of AFC’s Plan Design Process…………………………………………………………. 24 16. Understanding Illinois Prisons, Chicago’s Re-entry Community and the

     Role of Housing and Support…………………………………………………………………………. 25 17. S.W.O.T. Analysis: Chicago’s Reentry Strengths, Weaknesses,

     Opportunities and Threats……………………………………………………….……………………. 31 18. 24/7 Housing and Support Connection: AFC’s plan to expand housing

     and support for Chicago’s ex-offenders through a five-tiered plan…..………………. 32 19. Tier One: Advocate for Expanded Capacity of Supportive Housing in Chicago….. 33 20. Tier Two: Coordinate Chicago Area Supportive Service Providers………………….. 35 21. Tier Three: Centralize Connections between Ex-Offenders and Service

     Providers……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 37 22. Tier Four: Connecting with Prisoners Prior to Release………………….………………... 38 23. Tier Five: Connect Ex-Offenders in a Network of Peer Support………………………. 40 24. Flow Chart of the 24/7 Housing and Support Connection……………….……………… 41 25. From the Field: Stories of Two Chicago Ex-Offenders’ Struggle with

     Housing and Support Services………………………………………………………...……………. 42 26. Impact Statement………………………………………………………………………….……………… 43 27. Conclusions………………………………………………………………………………..………………… 44 28. Implementation Plan for 24/7 Housing and Support Connection……...…………….. 45 29. Chicago Mental Health Services…………………………………………………………………….. 47 30. Thresholds Summary…………………………………………………………………………………… 48 31. Roseland Community Profile and Resources (IDOC Map/Directory)………………. 50 32. End Notes…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 54

Appendices

    A. Budget

    B. Factsheet

    C. Service Providers Directory D. PowerPoint Presentation

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    Foreword: A note on St. Leonard’s House

    St. Leonard’s House provides a space where formerly incarcerated men can find a safe environment upon return into the community. Not only do they attend supportive services, they are provided with the tools to develop skills to rebuild their lives and reshape their futures. These men are as diverse as the neighborhoods they come from and St. Leonard’s provides the services

    to meet the needs of each individual. These services include reintegration activities where participants can transition back into the community.

    Events such as these are possible because of the well trained staff at St. Leonard’s and

    their commitment to serving a community in need.

    The Reentry Housing Taskforce of Chicago fully supports St. Leonard’s mission and the Re-entry Housing for Health Partnership project. The taskforce knows the need in the Cook County community and the mission of this project is that we not only recognize that need but take a stand to address it. We know the importance of housing in the lives of everyone in our community, and for those who are reentering it’s just as crucial.

-The Reentry Housing Taskforce of Chicago

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    1. Executive Summary and Recommendations

In 2004, Illinois released 39,293 state prisonersan increase of nearly 34% since 2000, 1and the fourth-highest volume of prison releasees in the United States. More than 60%

    of state prison releasees now return to the city of Chicago, at a rate of nearly 500 per 2week.

    The incarcerated population is additionally challenged by high rates of mental and physical illness, addiction, and illiteracy, coupled with insufficient prison resources for treatment and continuing education. Thus, many prisoners on the verge of release are ill equipped to resume living independently, and face immediate challenges to accessing community-based resources for new or continuing care. A prison sentence results in lapses in employment history and familial supports. Illinois prisons generally offer some form of pre-release education programs, covering such topics as finding a job, obtaining photo identification, finding a place to live, and accessing health care. Approximately 45% of prisoners do not return to their communities of origin, and thus may be unfamiliar 3with the supportive services available in their area. In the short term, individuals leaving

    prison also face significant challenges to accessing housing, both through a lack of adequate discharge planning, and a shortage of community-based housing resources. While many releasees may intend to stay with family or friends, these arrangements are not always feasible, particularly if the environment violates the conditions of parole (such as drug activity or another person with a criminal record in the home). Releasees cannot immediately access homeless housing assistance programs within the existing Continuum of Care, due to eligibility restrictions imposed by McKinney-Vento funding. Chicago currently maintains a limited number of short- and long-term transitional reentry housing programs; the majority of these providers, however, are grassroots organizations that do not offer intensive case management or linkages to support services. Prisoners returning to Chicago without pre-arranged housing must rely on an already overburdened shelter systemon any given night, Chicago has approximately 5,000 shelter beds for an 4estimated homeless population of 6,715 adults and children.

    Individuals who do secure immediate housing experience high rates of mobility within the first year of release: 19% of Illinois Returning Home participants reported living at

    more than