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TalentBalancingStudyGuide

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TalentBalancingStudyGuide

    Talent Balancing Staff Your Company for Long-Term Success

    Release 1.0

    March 2006

Overview:

    This is a study guide for the book “Talent Balancing – Staff Your Company for Long-Term Success

    by Jim Stedt - Praeger Publishers Westport, CT, a book on business management and staffing. . This book, forms and checklists are based on practices that have been proven successful in actual business practice. It is not based on theories. All of the case examples are also based on real life experiences. The Talent Balancing study guide is broken down by individual chapters, with reading assignments, key lecture points, case examples for group discussions for the class, additional references, glossary of terms, chapter quizzes and a final exam.

Talent Balancing Defined

    The ability to balance the workload with the appropriate and competent staff. The objective is to be able to produce goods and services to meet corporate goals with a minimum number of employees working at the highest level of productivity. At the same time, employees need to be challenged, comfortable with their responsibilities, and capable of meeting their goals. Talent balancing is a dynamic processit always involves a specialized methodology in recruiting staff with an eye toward balancing current and future capacity and goals. It also builds teams that stay together and continue to be very efficient and productive. Finally, talent balancing includes an effective management technique in order to keep the staff challenged and fulfilled.

    Talent Balancing Book Details:

    ; Title: “Talent Balancing – Staff you company for long- term success”

    ; Classification: Business / Human Resources

    ; Hardcover: 188 pages, Figures, Statistics. Forms and Tables

    ; Publisher: Praeger Publishers / Greenwood Publishers Group www.greenwood.com

    ; Availability: - Amazon.com, bordersstores.com, barnesandnoble.com, other on-line

    vendors

    ; List Price: $34.95

    ; Quantity Discounts Available: lisa.webber@greenwood.com

    ; Language: English

    ; ISBN: 0275985792

    ; LC Card Number: 2005020946

    ; LCC Class: HF5549

    ; Dewey Class: 658

    ; Additional information: www.talentbalancing.com and www.greenwood.com

    About The Author

    JIM STEDT is founder and president of Hartley & Associates, a Southern Californiabased staffing,

    management, and recruitment consulting firm. For over 22 years he has advised both startups and established firms in all areas of staffing and related human resource issues. Previously, he held a variety of management positions in several companies, including Varian Associates, GTE, and Microdata and ACT. He has written a monthly column for MicroTimes magazine and has published a computer textbook, Re-Organize. He is the former president of Human Resources Independent

    Consultants Association and speaks to industry groups, colleges, and at networking workshops on management and recruiting strategies. Talk to the author at jstedt@hartleyandassociates.com

Key Lecture Points:

    ; Six steps for Talent Balancing

    1. Ascertain your needs of your company

    2. Explore your hidden talent pool within your company

    3. Recruit what you need from the out side

    4. Build talent balancing into the recruiting process Looking to the future

    5. Manage your talent (see Reality Management for additional details)

    6. Control costs and chaos with talent balancing

Reading Assignment: Pages 1-15

Case Examples for Group Discussions:

Case Example 1-1: Administrative Assistant in a Box Page 7

    An administrative assistant had been working for a company for over seven years. She started as an administrative assistant when she first came on board. She was in the same department, did the same work, and interfaced with the same people day after day. She supported technical writers and was taking college classes in tech writing and doing very well. When an opening came up for a junior tech writer, she applied. However, since she was always looked upon as an administrative assistant and the HR manager did not know she was taking classes, she was ignored. Management did not have the foresight to even let her go through the interview process. She was labeled, put in a box, and overlooked. Shortly afterward, she left the company to go to another organization that did hire her as a junior technical writer. After being there for over a year, she returned to the original company and took a new technical writer position that had opened up. Coming from the outside, everyone accepted her as a technical writer, forgetting that she used to be an administrative assistant. The only way she could get the position was to leave the company and come back.

    ; What are other examples of people that are ―put in a box‖ and not allowed to try other things?

    ; Was there anything else that the Administrative Assistant could do?

    ; What was management‘s mistake?

    ; What should have management done?

Case Example 1-2: The Demoted Manager Page 10

    A new manager was brought in to take over for the current manager, who had been promoted from being an individual contributor into the manager's position, but apparently could not do the job. The company decided to demote the manager back to being an individual contributor and to look outside the company for a new manager. The HR department warned the incoming manager that the demoted manager might be difficult or become a troublemaker. After he came on board, the new manager met with the demoted manager. The first thing out of the demoted manager's mouth was, "Boy, I sure am glad you are here! I didn't know that being a manager meant doing so much paperwork and having to listen to all the staff's personal problems!" He turned out to be one of the biggest supporters of the new manager and never caused a problem.

    ; Name other reasons why promotions may not work?

    ; Should you (as a worker) demote yourself if you do not like the responsibilities?

    ; What other actions could the demoted manager do?

Case Example 1-3: Balancing Talent with Workload Page 12

    A computer company in its third year of operation and second round of funding was looking for a component engineer, although they were not yet in production. They decided to engage a recruiting consultant to help fill the position. When asked by the consultant why they needed someone a full year before production was slated to begin, the hiring managers explained that they wanted someone to set up their drawings, create a component library, organize and file the drawings, establish component specifications and relationships with vendors, and then manage the transition into production. They were adamant that they needed a full-time person to begin immediately. An ideal candidate was found. In sixty days, he had all the prep work completed. After that, he sat in his office, attended staff meetings, and drank coffee. After ten months, with production delayed, the company ended up laying off this engineer. Moral of the story: If you do not have the work, do not hire! Keep your talent balanced with the workload. Hire and keep staff based upon ongoing, long-term needs.

    ; Give additional examples where there may not be enough work for long term employment

    ; What should management do to determine the length of a project?

    ; Is hiring a consultant for 3 months cheaper that hiring a full time person? If so, why?

Case Example 1-4: Keeping Employees Informed Page 19

    A fast-growing company needed a method of keeping the employees up-to-date with the latest activities in the organization. They decided to have all-hands meetings. They would bring in lunch for everybody on the first Friday of every month. During lunch, they would have HR make announcements (HR always has something to address) and then the president would give a positive, informational, and short presentation on what was going on, new contracts, new developments, and so on. At the end of every fiscal quarter, management would hand out quality corporate giveaways, such as calculators, golf shirts, key chains, and so on, to all the employees after the meeting. This company also had a bonus program for all employees. Fifty percent of it was based on department or corporate objectives and the other fifty percent based on individual contribution. At the same time every year, the CFO would distribute all the checks at the end of the all-hands meeting in alphabetical sequence. As the individual employee received his or her check, the rest of the organization clapped and congratulated the staffer. Internal public relations was always at a high level and employees always felt they were part of a team and rewarded for their efforts

    ; Why is it important to keep employees informed?

    ; Why is ―internal PR‖ important?

    ; How do you think the employees felt after something like this?

    ; How would you feel?

    ; What other ways are there to key employees informed?

Additional Reference: Glossary of Terms

CHAPTER QUIZ:

    1 - Which of the following is NOT one of the six talent balancing points?

    A- Explore your hidden talent pool within your company

    B - Recruit what you need from the out side

    C - Build talent balancing into the recruiting process Looking to the future

    D - Give bonus parties every quarter

    2 - What is ―Internal PR‖ and is it important?

    3 - Can you control costs with Talent Balancing?

ANSWERS: (in bold)

    Which of the following is NOT one of the six talent balancing points?

    A - Explore your hidden talent pool within your company

    B - Recruit what you need from the out side

    C - Build talent balancing into the recruiting process Looking to the future

    D - Give bonus parties every quarter

    1- What is ―Internal PR‖ and is it important?

    Internal PR helps promote communications and knowledge among the employees and give them a feeling of working as a “team”

    2- Can you control costs with Talent Balancing?

    Yes, by reducing turnover and headcount this should in turn increase profits

Key Lecture Points:

    These are the 12 steps of Reality management

    1. Set the attitude

    2. Communicate

    3. Have a plan

    4. Define staff and responsibilities

    5. Provide the tools

    6. Delegate and monitor

    7. Handle change

    8. Coach and mentor

    9. Be honest

    10. Be visible and approachable

    11. Manage from respect

    12. Maintain a sense of humor

Reading Assignment: Pages 16-26

Case Examples for Group Discussions:

    Case Example 1-5: Disseminate the Plan - Page 20

    The president of a small division of a major aerospace firm is told by corporate that they are going to reorganize the division by product, in effect splitting them in two. Half will be moved down the road to a new facility and the other half will remain in their present facility. Instead of putting a plan together to do this and then disseminating it to the division, the president called an all-hands meeting and told everybody what was going to occur. When asked when it was going to happen, who was going to be affected, and how it was going to be handled, all he could say was, "I don't know." It took only a ten-minute meeting to scare or anger almost all of the employees of the organization. Many of those who had been there for a long, long time went home and wrote their resumes.

    ; Why is it important to have a plan?

    ; Do you think employees will know if there is not a corporate plan?

    ; What would you do if you attended this meeting?

Case Example 1-6: The Invisible President Page 24

    A small (staff of 50) start-up company had a president who rarely would come out of his office. Few saw him when he arrived in the morning and even fewer would see him leave at night. The rest of upper management suggested that they have a monthly all-hands lunch/meeting. The president would update the staff on news of the company, potential customers, new customers, and so on. Then they would serve the catered lunch. It was a great idea, except after the president gave his (always short) pitch, he would not take any questions, and would be first in line for the food. After loading up his plate, he would then go back to his office and eat by himself leaving the rest of the company downstairs. This is not a leader, and consequently the company eventually went bankrupt.

    ; What would you do different if you were the president?

    ; How would you feel if you were an employee of this company?

    ; What would be a better way to handle this monthly meeting?

Case Example 1-7: A Sense of Humor Page 25

    The CEO of a multibillion dollar East Coast computer corporation was on an inspection tour of one of their facilities in California. Everyone in the facility was dressed up and there was a feeling of formality and stiffness in the air. When the CEO came out onto the production floor, everyone held their breath because they did not expect him to be out there. Since the CEO came up the ranks as an engineer himself, he wanted to see the hardware being built and tested. A young product manager boldly stepped up and started explaining the testing process. The CEO stared at the equipment and calmly asked ―Why was the smaller printer faster than the larger printer?‖ The product manager thought for a second and quipped, ―Since it is in a smaller space, the data wants to get out faster!‖ Everyone in the area laughed and all of a sudden you could feel them all relaxing.

    After that, the CEO took his coat off, sat on a computer table, and told stories of when he was an engineer. Later, the California facility heard from corporate that the CEO enjoyed his trip there best because the people there had a great sense of humor.

    ; Give an example of how having a sense of humor is good in business nowadays

    ; Is there any time when humor should not be used?

    ; Is humor good in business?

Additional Reference: Glossary of Terms

CHAPTER QUIZ:

    1- Which one of the following is NOT one of the 12 step to Reality Management

    A - Define staff and responsibilities

    B - Always laugh at the employees jokes

    C - Provide the tools

    D - Delegate and monitor

    E - Handle change

    2-Why is having a plan necessary?

    3-Is it important to be visible to employees when you are a president? If so, why?

ANSWERS: (in bold)

    1 - Which one of the following is NOT one of the 12 steps to Reality Management?

    A - Define staff and responsibilities

    B - Always laugh at the employees jokes

    C - Provide the tools

    D - Delegate and monitor

    E - Handle change

    2-Why is having a plan necessary?

    It is the only way to determine how many and what kind of full time/part time employees are needed

    3-Is it important to be visible to employees when you are a president? If so, why? Yes, the President/Owner must show the staff that they are concerned and available and approachable and one of the best ways to do it is to be visible.

    Key Lecture Points:

    ; Communications Focal Point

    ; Creation of Staffing Plan

    o Know the industry

    o Know the company and its corporate culture

    o Find out the number of requisitions needed and types of

    o openings

    o Know projected hire dates

    o Determine locations of hires

    o Determine recruiting budget

    o Implementation plan

    o Managing your time

    o Driving the process

    o Interviews

    o Negotiating the compensation package

    o Making the offer

    o New hire follow-up

    ; Salary Compression Issues

    Reading Assignment: Pages 33 to 44

    Case Examples for Group Discussions: None

    Additional Reference: Glossary of Terms

    CHAPTER QUIZ:

    1 - Which one of the following is NOT part of a Staffing Plan?

    A - Knowing candidates to hire

    B - Know the industry

    C - Know the company and its corporate culture

    D - Find out the number of requisitions needed and types of openings

    E - Know projected hire dates

    2 Why is it important to have a staffing plan?

    3- What is Salary Compression?

    4- How do you solve Salary Compression issues?

    ANSWERS: (in bold)

    1 - Which one of the following is NOT part of a Staffing Plan?

    A - Knowing candidates to hire

    B - Know the industry

    C - Know the company and its corporate culture

    D - Find out the number of requisitions needed and types of openings

    E - Know projected hire dates

2 Why is it important to have a staffing plan?

    A staffing plan will reveal how many people must be hired and when. It will also help determine the cost to hire and on going cost of new employees

    3- What is Salary Compression?

    Salary Compression occurs when the industry average salary rates are higher than you company. This happens because your company may not be giving yearly raises that are as high as the industry average.

    4 - How do you solve Salary Compression issues?

    It is essential to monitor you industry salary ranges and put any of your employees who are under these ranges on a fast track to obtain parity with the industry.

Chapter 3: The Job Requisition

Key Lecture Points:

    ; Job requisition defined

    ; The importance of a job requisition

    ; The job requisition procedure

    1. Evaluate the need

    2. Create the job requisition

    3. Authorize the job requisition.

    4. Approve the job requisition.

    5. Open the requisition

    6. Perform the search or change the requisition

    7. Close the requisition

    8. Create pending requisitions

Reading Assignment: Pages 41 to 52

Case Examples for Group Discussions: None

; Review the sample Job Requisition Form #3-1

Additional Reference: Glossary of Terms

CHAPTER QUIZ:

    1- What is a Job Requisition?

    2-Why is it important to have a Job Requisition form and procedure 3- Which of the following is NOT an important part of the Job Requisition Procedure?

    A - Evaluate the need

    B - Create the job requisition

    C - Authorize the job requisition.

    D - Approve the job requisition.

    E - Open the requisition

    F - File the Requisition

ANSWERS: (in bold)

    1- What is a Job Requisition?

    It is the official document used to determine the exact time when the person will be hired, the

    salary range, who the person reports to and what (in detail) they will do.

    2-Why is it important to have a Job Requisition form and procedure This will control the financial expenditure, the hiring process (and cost) along with making the

    corporate commitment to take the action to hire.

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