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NY updated k-12 correlation 0106

By Leo Parker,2014-11-25 23:41
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NY updated k-12 correlation 0106

    A Correlation Between

    New York Learning Standards

    And

    Junior Achievement Programs

     Updated June 2009

     ? JA Worldwide

     One Education Way

     Colorado Springs, CO 80906

    Overview

    In this document, Junior Achievement programs are correlated to the New York Learning Standards for social studies (1996), English language arts (1996), and mathematics (2005) for grades K-12.

Junior Achievement programs offer a multidisciplinary approach connecting information across social

    studies disciplines such as economics, geography, history, government, and civics while incorporating mathematical concepts and reasoning and language arts skills.

    This list is not meant to be exhaustive or intended to suggest that a JA program will completely address any given standard, but is designed to show how it can enhance or complement efforts to do so. The flexibility of the programs and supplementary materials allow specific content or skills to be addressed in depth by the teacher and/or business volunteer as needed.

Elementary School Programs

    Ourselves uses compelling stories read aloud by the volunteer, along with hands-on activities to demonstrate helping, working, earning, and saving. Five required, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for kindergarten.

    Our Families emphasizes the roles people play in the local economy and engages students with activities about needs, wants, jobs, tools and skills, and interdependence. Five required, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for first grade.

    Our Community explores the interdependent roles of workers in a community, the work they perform, and how communities work. Five required, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for second grade.

    Our City studies careers, the skills people need to work in specific careers, and how businesses contribute to a city. Five required, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for third grade.

    Our Region introduces the relationship between the natural, human, and capital resources found in different regions and explores regional businesses that produce goods and services for consumers. Five required, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for fourth grade.

    Our Nation provides practical information about businesses’ need for individuals who can meet the demands of the job market, including high-growth, high-demand jobs. Further, it introduces the concept of globalization of business as it relates to production materials and the need for students to be entrepreneurial in their thinking to meet the requirements of high-growth, high-demand careers worldwide. Five required, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for fifth grade.

JA More than Money teaches students about earning, spending, sharing, and saving money, and

    businesses they can start or jobs they can perform to earn money. Six required, after-school, volunteer-led sessions. Recommended for grades three-five.

Middle Grades Programs

    JA Global Marketplace provides practical information about the global economy and its effect on the students’ lives. Six required, volunteer-led sessions.

JA America Works provides students with examples of how business and entrepreneurship affected the theconomic development of the United States during the 19 century. Six required, volunteer-led sessions.

    i

    JA Economics for Success explores personal finance and students’ education and career options based on their skills, interests, and values; also demonstrates the economic benefits of staying in school. Six required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA It’s My Business! encompasses entrepreneurship curriculum for students in grades six, seven, and eight. The program emphasizes entrepreneurship while providing a strong focus on social studies, reading, and writing skills. Students are encouraged to use critical thinking to learn entrepreneurial skills that support positive attitudes as they explore and enhance their career aspirations. Six required, volunteer-led sessions.

High School Programs

    JA Banks in Action teaches high school students the principles of the banking industry and introduces them to the challenges of successfully operating a bank in a competitive environment. Eight required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Be Entrepreneurial introduces students to the essential components of a practical business plan, and challenges them to start and entrepreneurial venture while still in high school.

    JA Business Ethics uses hands-on activities to foster ethical decision-making in students as they prepare to enter the workforce and the global marketplace. Seven required and five optional, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Careers with a Purpose introduces students to the importance of seeking careers that help them realize their life potential and noble purpose. The program demonstrates the importance of positive values, life maxims, and ethical decision-making within the context of career and life decisions. Seven required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Economics examines the fundamental concepts of micro-, macro-, and international economics. Seven required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Success Skills meets the needs of a diverse group of high school students by providing engaging, academically enriching, and experiential-learning sessions in work-readiness education and career perspectives. Seven required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Titan introduces critical economics and management decisions through an interactive simulation. Seven required, volunteer-led sessions.

Junior Achievement Presents: The NEFE High School Financial Planning Program introduces

    students to the importance of planning for their financial future. The program demonstrates the roles that budgeting, investing, credit, and insurance play in securing financial stability. When able to use the entire NEFE High School Financial Planning Program along with the JA experience, students will have a

    complete portfolio of skills to make financial decisions and set financial goals throughout their lives. Five required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Exploring Economics fosters lifelong skills and knowledge about how an economy works, including micro-, macro-, personal, and international economics. Seven required, volunteer-led sessions.

    JA Company Program analyzes and explores personal opportunities and responsibilities within a student-led company. Twelve required, volunteer-led meetings.

    ii

    JA Job Shadow meets the needs of a diverse group of high school students by providing engaging, academically enriching, and experiential-learning sessions in work-readiness education and career perspectives. In-school, teacher-led sessions; pre- and post-Job Shadow experiences.

    iii

    Ourselves

    English Description Key Learning Objectives Social Studies Mathematics Language Arts

    Objectives: The students will: 3-1 1-1 Activity One: Robbie’s

    -recognize the role of self 4-1 1-2 Trip to the Farm

    Students are introduced to a -appreciate individual differences 4-2 2-1 storybook character and his Concepts: barter, goods, individual, 5-3 3-1 visit to a family farm. voluntary exchange, work 4-1 Through a group discussion Skills: abstract thinking, decision and by drawing pictures of making, drawing, following their favorite animals, they directions, interpreting information, discover that individuals listening responsively, sequencing

    make choices.

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 K.CM.2 Activity Two: Angie and

    -define money 4-2 1-2 K.CN.1, 3 the Carnival

    Students are introduced to a -identify one form of money (coins) 2-1 K.R.4 storybook character and her -differentiate coins 3-1 K.N.1, 3 plans to earn money by Concepts: buying, choices, 4-1 making and selling crafts at a consumer, earning, entrepreneurs, carnival. incentives, money, saving,

     spending, work

    Skills: coin recognition, coin

    valuation, following directions,

    interpreting information, listening

    responsively, matching

    Objectives: The students will: 3-1 1-1 K.A.1 Activity Three: Charlie

    -recognize the importance of 5-3 1-2 K.G.5 Plants a Garden

    Students learn how the working together 2-1 storybook characters work -discover rewards other than money 3-1 together to plant a Concepts: benefit, choices, 4-1 community garden. resources, rewards, work

     Skills: abstract thinking, decision

    making, following directions,

    listening responsively, teamwork

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 K.PS.9 Activity Four: Meagan

    -discuss the importance of saving 4-2 1-2 K.CM.2 Buys a Present

    Students recognize the money 5-3 2-1 K.CN.1, 3 importance of saving money -identify a place where people save 3-1 K.R.4 to buy something they want money 4-1 K.N.13 through a story about a girl -demonstrate how to save money

    who must save to buy a -name something they would like to birthday present. save for

    Concepts: buying, choice, costs, earning, money, saving, scarcity,

    wants, work

    Skills: coin recognition, coin

    valuation, following directions,

    listening responsively, matching

    4

    English Description Key Learning Objectives Social Studies Mathematics Language Arts

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 K.CN.1, 3 Activity Five: Dylan and

    -identify ways money can be used to 4-2 1-2 K.N.11 the New Playground

    Students learn how benefit others 5-3 2-1 storybook characters save -recognize the value of work 3-1 money to buy new -appreciate the importance of giving 4-1 playground equipment for Concepts: benefit, giving, saving, their school. scarcity, work

     Skills: abstract thinking, following

    directions, listening responsively,

    matching, sequencing, teamwork

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    Our Families

    English Description Key Learning Objectives Social Studies Mathematics Language Arts

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 Activity One: Our Families

    Students better understand -identify what a family is 5.3 1-2 what a family is by studying -recognize how people live and 2-1 a poster. They discover how work together in a family 3-1 people in a family are alike Concepts: family, interdependence, 4-1 and different and how they job, work

    work together to make the Skills: analyzing information, place where they live a good drawing, following directions, place. listening responsively, matching,

     sequencing

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 Activity Two: Our

    -explain the difference between a 4-2 1-2 Families' Needs and Wants

    Students become aware that need and a want 3-1 all families must have food, Concepts: economic incentives, 4-1 clothing, and shelter to live, family, scarcity, wants and needs

    and they begin to understand Skills: decision making,

    the difference between a differentiating, following directions, need and a want. listening responsively

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 Activity Three: Our

    -define a job as work that needs to 4-2 1-2 Families' Jobs

    Students learn how jobs be done 5-3 3-1 provide for family members' -identify jobs people do 4-1 needs and wants. They draw Concepts: business, economic pictures of family members incentives, employment, family, doing jobs. human resources, income, jobs,

    skills Skills: analyzing information,

    drawing, following directions,

    making observations

    Objectives: The students will: 3-1 1-1 Activity Four: Finding Our

    -interpret map symbols 3-2 1-2 Families’ Needs and Wants

    Students use a floor map to -place various kinds of symbols for 4-1 3-1 discover where members of a businesses and services on a map 4-2 4-1 family would go to obtain -recognize how family members their needs and wants. depend on various businesses to

     provide their needs and wants

    Concepts: business, economic

    institutions, scarcity, wants and

    needs

    Skills: decision making, following

    directions, map reading, recognizing

    and interpreting symbols

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    English Description Key Learning Objectives Social Studies Mathematics Language Arts

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 1.PS.3 Activity Five: Paying for

    -describe various jobs at which 4-2 1-2 1.CN.2, 4, 7 Our Families' Needs and

    people earn money 5-3 3-1 1.R.1, 6 Wants

    Students learn about the -recognize that families use money 4-1 1.M.4 importance of working to to satisfy their needs and wants

    pay for needs and wants. Concepts: earning, job, money, Through role-play, they spending, wants and needs, work

    demonstrate working and Skills: analyzing information, paying for needs and wants. following directions, listening

     responsively

    7

    Our Community

    English Description Key Learning Objectives Social Studies Mathematics Language Arts

    Objectives: The students will: 3-1 1-1 Activity One: How Does a

    -identify a variety of jobs in the 3-2 1-2 Community Work?

    Students study a poster community 4-1 3-1

    illustrating a community to -recognize how people live and 4-2 4-1

    identify typical jobs. They work together in a community 5-3

    develop an awareness of how -become aware of a wide range of people live and work job opportunities

    together in a community. Concepts: community,

     interdependence, job, wants and

    needs

    Skills: decision making, following

    directions, making observations,

    matching

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 2.PS.1, 2, 4-8 Activity Two: Sweet ―O‖

    -define production 4-2 1-2 2.RP.2-4 Donuts

    Students, individually and in -compare unit and assembly line 3-1 2.CM.2, 6 teams, use different production methods 3-2 2.CN.2, 4-9 production strategies to -explain that different strategies are 4-1 2.R.1, 4, 6 simulate producing donuts. used to produce different types of 2.N.5, 8, 16

     products 2.S.2, 4

    Concepts: defect, production/

    productivity, quality, specialization

    and division of labor

    Skills: following directions,

    interpreting data, making

    observations, making predictions,

    role playing, teamwork

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 2.PS.1, 6-8 Activity Three: The Role of

    -recognize government jobs in the 4-2 1-2 2.CN.2, 4-9 Government

    Students learn about the community 5-1 3-1 2.N.16, 17 economic role of -understand why taxation is 5-3 4-1 2.M.6 government in a community necessary by identifying services that Concepts: government, taxes,

    government provides to its goods, services, benefits

    citizens. The students also Skills: critical thinking, following recognize that government directions, making observations, must collect taxes from matching, role playing

    everyone to pay for these

    services.

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    English Description Key Learning Objectives Social Studies Mathematics Language Arts

    Objectives: The students will: 3-1 1-1 2.PS.1, 2, 4-7 Activity Four: A New

    -define choices 3-2 1-2 2.RP.2 Business

    Students determine the best -use a decision-making model 4-1 3-1 2.CM.1-3 use for the empty store on -recognize the need to make 4-2 3-2 2.CN.2, 4-9 the How Does a Community informed decisions 5-3 4-1 2.R.1, 4, 6 Work poster. The step-by--take personal responsibility for 5-4 2.N.5 step decision-making process decisions 2.S.1, 2, 4 helps students understand Concepts: business, choices, how group decisions are resources, trade-offs, vote, ballot

    made. Skills: decision making, identifying

     choices, developing ideas, listening

    responsively, problem solving,

    teamwork

    Objectives: The students will: 4-1 1-1 2.PS.1, 3 Activity Five: Money

    -identify circumstances of money 4-2 1-2 2.CN.4, 7 Moves

    Students learn about an being exchanged for goods or 3-1 2.R.1, 6 economy's circular flow of services 4-1 2.M.6 money. -recognize how money flows

     through a community's economy

    Concepts: bank, economic

    institutions, circular flow of money,

    goods, money, services, skills

    Skills: listening responsively,

    developing ideas, role playing,

    making observations, following

    directions

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