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Department of English Language and Literature(1)

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Department of English Language and Literature(1)

    Department of English Language and Literature

    NUS

    ENGLISH LITERATURE

    MODULES OFFERED IN AY2010/11: Sem 1

    Every effort is made to ensure that the information, applicable policies, and all other materials contained in this webpage are accurate and current. However, the Department reserves the right to reschedule modules or not to offer certain modules. Unless otherwise stated, all level 1000 3000 modules carry 4 modular credits (MCs); and all level 4000 modules carry 5 MCs (except EN4401 which carries 15 MCs).

    Detailed course descriptions and reading lists are available in the open shelves on Level 6 of Block AS5.

EN1101E An Introduction to Literary Studies

    Pre-requisite(s): Exempted from NUS Qualifying English Test, or passed NUS Qualifying

    English Test, or exempted from further CELC Remedial English modules.

    Preclusion(s): EN2101, EN2101E, GEK1000

    Cross-listing(s): GEK1000

    Lecturer(s): A/P Chitra Sankaran and Dr James Stone

    Human beings are 'tale-telling animals'. We all tell stories, and we all listen to them, read

    them and watch them. This module looks at the ways in which people tell stories, the kinds of stories they tell, and the meanings those stories generate. It focuses, in particular, upon the telling, and gives special attention to questions concerned with that. Texts include a novel, a

    play, films, short stories, poems and oral tales.

EN2111 Reading British / World Texts

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Preclusion(s): AS2213, EN2111, EN2113

    Lecturer(s): Dr Gilbert Yeoh

    Drawing from a variety of literary texts from Britain and the world over, this course will give students opportunities to carry out close critical readings of literary texts. How does a reader engage with any literary text? The course will introduce students to a variety of reading

    approaches that may include: interpreting texts for their aesthetic and ideological dimensions; relating individual works to the larger literary tradition; situating texts within their social and historical contexts. The course will also encourage students to write about

    literary texts with a view towards sharpening their skills in creating effective arguments.

EN3223 Nineteenth Century Literature & Culture

    (British Literature after 1800)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Lecturer(s): A/P Daphne Pan

    The module will cover selected poetic and prose writings from the Victorian period, an age that witnessed the nineteenth century's most historically important developments. Students will be directed to study literary and other cultural works with the historical context in mind.

EN3227 Romanticism

    (British Literature after 1800)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

Lecturer(s): Dr Susan Ang

    This module will look at „Romanticism‟ as it manifests in English and European literature. The set of texts and supplementary readings are intended to provide the student with an introduction to the socio-historical background to the Romantic period and to some of the tropes and ideas that may be said to form the nucleus of the term „Romanticism‟; for example, feeling, liberty, the inner life, the overreacher, revolution, the relationship to the past, the relationship between the city and the country, etc. To complement the texts being taught, the contributions of the other arts (painting, music), will also be discussed.

EN3228 Women Novelists: 1750 - 1800

    (British Literature before 1800)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Lecturer(s): Dr Jane Nardin

    From 1750 to 1800, the number of novels written by women rose, even as women were

    increasingly confined to the domestic sphere. After the French Revolution, in the 1790s, conservative and reformist women novelists, agreeing that the patriarchal family was England‟s most important institution, argued that domestic conduct could have serious political implications. But they disagreed sharply about the nature of those implications. In this module, we will read a variety of novels against this historical backdrop, considering the fictional strategies women used to tell stories that were often at odds with the dominant values of their culture.

EN3232 American Literature II

    (American Literature)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Preclusion(s): AS3232

    Cross-listing(s): AS3232

    Lecturer(s): A/P John Whalen-Bridge

    This course concerns twentieth-century American writing from Reconstruction through

    present; it examines typical aspects of American character/imagination. The course trains students in the close reading of a variety of literary texts (naturalist, modernist,

    postmodernist) and a variety of literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama). The course is aimed at undergraduate English literature majors, but cross-faculty students who enjoy literature are

    welcome.

EN3234 Asian American Literature

    (American Literature)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Preclusion(s): AS3234

    Cross-listing(s): AS3234

    Lecturer(s): A/P Walter Lim

    This module provides an overview of Asian American literature, with texts chosen from the

    main genres and across the period of the last half-century or so. It outlines the specific

    thematic concerns of this literature, but also the assumptions underlying the term "Asian American literature" itself. The relationships between society, culture, and text will be

    foregrounded in our consideration of these concerns. The module is designed for Literature students interested in a visibly emerging area of literary and ideological production within the larger controlling rubric we refer to as "American literature."

EN3242 History of Film (TS-recognised module)

(Film and Cultural Studies)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000, and any film module

    (EN2113, EN3248, GEK1031, GEK1044, GEK2020) or EN2241.

    Lecturer(s): Dr Valerie Wee

    This module is an introductory survey of the history of the motion picture from its invention up to the present. We will look at the way that the medium has developed as an art and a business. In addition, we will examine a number of different film movements around the

    world as well as key filmmakers and genres. Lectures and readings will consider film's relationship to society as well as to other cultural forms. This course aims to provide students with a critical perspective on the complex forces that have shaped the motion picture's

    evolutionary phases.

    EN3261 European Literature I

    (World Literatures)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Preclusion(s): EU3217

    Cross-listing: EU3217

    Lecturer(s): Dr Barnard Turner

    This module explores a selection of generally short, popular, and major European literary works which work with the legacy of Romanticism, Realism, and Modernism in the new context of postWorld War Two Europe and the rise of the European Union; several texts are

    by Nobel Prize winners, and all are acknowledged as “contemporary classics.” Various genres are represented, and the module takes a relatively wide sweep across Europe. In addition, filmed versions of the texts are considered where appropriate and available. The module

    therefore will explore texts both in their own right and as representative examples of major tendencies and developments of an essentially European tradition.

EN3262 Postcolonial / Postmodern Writing

    (World Literatures)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Lecturer(s): A/P Rajeev Patke

    This module provides an introduction to interactions between postcolonial literatures and “postmodern” writing strategies. It proceeds through a series of case-studies attentive to how

    specific texts represent complex interactions in the global literature of the latter of the twentieth century between the influence of and reactions to colonialism in the field of political history and modernism in the field of literature and the arts. In addition to a close reading of

    representative texts, the module will also provide an opportunity for an assessment of the significance of “postcolonial” and “postmodern” to contemporary societies and cultures.

EN3271 Advanced Playwriting (EL-recognised [Single/Second Major] and TS-

    recognised module)

    (Writing & Research)

    Prerequisite(s): EN2271 or permission of instructor

    Preclusion(s): TS4212

    Lecturer(s): Mr Huzir Sulaiman

    In this module students will write (and rewrite!) two full length plays of no less than 60

    minutes in length. These will be critiqued intensively by their classmates and by the instructor. Students are at liberty to pick their own topics and genres. Specific historical or critical readings and dramatic texts will be assigned based on individual students interests

    (e.g. musical theatre, Theatre of the Oppressed). This is a demanding creative writing module requiring self-direction and artistic independence.

EN3274 Critical Reading

    (Writing & Research)

    Pre-requisite(s): EN1101E or EN2101 or EN2101E or GEK1000

    Lecturer(s): Dr Susan Ang

    This module, devoted to poetry, combines theory and practice. Theory will cover the elements of poetry, its craft, function and relationship with other genres. The linguistic and literary implications of writing in a Singapore context will be among the subjects discussed. Practice will consist mainly of analysing poems (read through various drafts) by members of the class. The link and interaction between theory and practice will be the major guiding principle.

EN4222 Topics in the Eighteenth Century

    (British Literature - before 1800)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum of

    28 MCs in EN. Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in EN, with a

    minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Lecturer(s): Prof John Richardson

    This module explores the broader significance and implications of new tendencies that arose in the eighteenth century, and the ways in which they herald the concerns of the modern

    world. Part one explores the tension between religion, science, and philosophy in the prose and poetry of the early eighteenth century, and the impact that new ways of conceiving the world had on social, cultural, intellectual and religious thinking. Part two explores the tension

    between tradition and individual expression in the poetry and painting of the second half of the century, and the variety of ways in which they reveal a new sensibility.

EN4224 Topics in the Twentieth Century

    (British Literature - after 1800)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: For EN students: Completed at least 80 MCs

    including a minimum of 28 MCs in EN. For EU Students: Completed at least 80 MCs of which

    at least 28 MCs must be EU/LA [French/German]/recognised modules.

    Cohort 2007 onwards: For EN students: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in EN, with a

    minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track. For EU Students: Completed 80 MCs,

    including 28 MCs of EU/LA [French/ German]/recognised modules, with a minimum CAP of

    3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Lecturer(s): Dr Jane Nardin

    The course provides students with knowledge of modernist texts, which they will analyse for their aesthetic, political and ideological strategies. Students will examine modernism as both a reaction to and a constituent part of modernity and will produce informed critical arguments about the historical, economic and technological developments that constitute modernity. Lectures will examine relationships that existed between literature and other cultural forms,

    like painting, architecture, music, and contemporary intellectual movements such as existential philosophy and psychoanalytic theory. The module is targeted at students interested in modern literature, art and thought, with at least 28 MCs in literature.

EN4231 The U.S. at War and Peace: Cold War Texts

    (American Literature)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum of

    28 MCs in English Literature. Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80 MCs including 28 MCs in

    English Literature, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Preclusion(s): AS4231

Cross-listing(s): AS4231

    Lecturer(s): A/P Ryan Bishop

    Students will think critically and engage with a wide range of materials and texts. Explicitly

    interdisciplinary in its approach and content, the course exposes to a variety of ideas and issues related to the militarization of society, economics, technology, culture and family. How the policies, technologies, and weapons of the Cold War have profoundly shaped the current

    moment. The cultural historical context of the Cold War through a range of documents and "texts" - including music, policy papers, art, historical documents, technology, films, TV, game theory, and literature. This is for EN majors/EN (Hons) students/Advanced CFM

    students/ISM students.

EN4234 Pynchon and the Poetics of Information

    (American Literature)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum of

    28 MCs in English Literature. Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80 MCs including 28 MCs in

    English Literature, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Lecturer(s): Dr David Teh

    This module examines the poetics of information in post-industrial society. At its core lies the

    oeuvre of Thomas Pynchon, whose novels will be read as a critical meta-narrative of the

    informational turn in Western society since the 1960s. Besides obvious technological effects and the accelerated exchange it enables, how has the new, informational paradigm affected

    our psychology, everyday life and work; our understandings of place and community, of history and culture? Rather than placing Pynchon within a literary canon, seminars will be thematic studies, drawing on a wide range of critical theory, cultural history, and critiques of

    globalization and technology.

EN4271 Research Workshop (TS-recognised module)

    (Writing and Research)

    Pre-requisite(s):

    Cohort 2006 and before:

    For English Literature (EN) students: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum of 28

    MCs in EN or EN-recognised modules.

    For Theatre Studies (TS) students: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum of 28 MCs in TS or TS-recognised modules.

    For European Studies (EU) students: Completed 28 MCs in EL, EN, or TS modules, or a

    combination from the three. Literary and/or linguistic modules from other departments may also contribute towards the 28 MCs total at the module chair's discretion.

    Cohort 2007 onwards:

    For EN students: Completed 80 MCs including 28 MCs in EN or EN-recognised modules, with a

    minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    For TS students: Completed 80 MCs including 28 MCs in TS or TS-recognised modules, with a

    minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    For EU students: Completed 28 MCs including 28 MCs in EL, EN or TS modules, or a

    combination from the three (Literary and/or linguistic modules from other departments may also contribute towards the 28 MCs total at the module chair's discretion), with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Preclusion(s): EL4200

    Lecturer(s): Dr Ross Forman

    As part of the preparation for writing research papers or Honours Theses, this module aims to help students understand the interpretative strategies, modes of argumentation, criteria for evaluating claims, analyses and theories, as well as expectations and conventions governing research in diverse areas of literary studies. The major topics will include research areas and questions; research claims; interpretative methods; evidence and argumentation; critical

evaluation of academic argument; and rhetorical conventions and strategies.

EN4401 Honours Thesis (equivalent to 15 MCs)

    (Writing and Research)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: (1) Completed at least 100 MCs including 56 MCs of EN major requirements, and (2) Obtained one of the following minimum standards at the point of registration (a) minimum CAP of 4.0 or (b) minimum SJAP of 4.0 and CAP of 3.5. Must be EN majors. Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 110 MCs, including 60 MCs of EN major requirements with a minimum CAP of 3.5.

    Preclusion(s): EN4660

    The Honours Thesis is usually done in the final semester of a student‟s pursuing an Honours degree. Please click here to view thesis guidelines.

EN4660 Independent Study

    (Writing and Research)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: To be offered subject to the agreement of the Supervisor and Department. Completed at least 100 MCs including 56 MCs of major requirements and obtained a minimum CAP of 3.2.

    Cohort 2007 onwards: To be offered subject to the agreement of the Supervisor and Department. Completed 100 MCs, including 60 MCs in EN, with a minimum CAP of 3.5.

    Preclusion(s): EN4401

    The Independent Study Module is designed to enable the student to explore an approved

    topic within the discipline in depth. The student should approach a lecturer to work out an agreed topic, readings, and assignments for the module. A formal written agreement is to be drawn up, giving a clear account of the topic, programme of study, assignments, evaluation, and other pertinent details. Head's and/or Honours Coordinator's approval of the written agreement is required. Regular meetings and reports are expected. Evaluation is based on

    100% Continuous Assessment and must be worked out between the student and the lecturer prior to seeking departmental approval.

EN4880B Modernism and Empire

    (British Literature after 1800)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum

    of 28 MCs in English Literature.

    Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80 MCs including 28 MCs in English Literature, with a

    minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Lecturer(s): A/p Rajeev Patke

    This module introduces students to the connections between modernist writing and modern

    colonialism, treating both phenomena as global in scale, and extended across languages, genres and societies. The topics and texts selected for the module show how contemporary cultures have been shaped by interactions between the experience of colonialism and the practices of aesthetic modernism, with primary reference to literary productions.

    EN-Recognised modules from Theatre Studies which can be used to fulfil EN major

    requirements

    thTS2239 Major Playwrights of the 20 Century (EN-recognised module)

    Pre-requisite(s): TS1101E or EN1101E or EN2101E

Lecturer: Mr Nelson Chia

    This module focuses on the close reading of dramatic texts in order to study the dynamic relationship between text & performance. Through the examination of 4 major modern

    playwrights working in different historical, geographical and cultural contexts, this course will th century, the significance of text as the explore the development of modern drama in the 20

    basis of theatrical realization, the variety of staging possibilities engendered by the

    dramaturgy of the play-text, and the synergistic partnership of word and action in creating ththe huge variety of text-based theatre in the 20 century.

TS4220 Shakespeare and Film (EN-recognised module)

    Pre-requisite(s): Cohort 2006 and before: Completed at least 80 MCs including a minimum of 28 MCs in EN or 28 MCs in TS.

    Cohort 2007 onwards: Completed 80 MCs, including 28 MCs in EN or 28 MCs in TS, with a minimum CAP of 3.5 or be on the Honours track.

    Lecturer: A/P Yong Li Lan

    This module provides a study of how the literary and performance traditions associated with Shakespeare‟s work are mobilized and transformed by the visual cultures of contemporary cinema. Through the intersections between the mediums of the dramatic text, theatre and

    film, the course examines central issues that shape Shakespeare‟s currency and circulation in the cinema: the values attached to authenticity and performance traditions, the Shakespearean actor, the appropriation and parody of the “universality” of Shakespeare, and

    the transformation of the meaningfulness of his plays through visuality and spectacle.

    Other EN-recognised modules: (Please confirm the semester that the module is being offered with the relevant department.)

    PS4220 Rhetoric and Politics

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