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The Lincoln Minute Man Dispatch

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The Lincoln Minute Man Dispatch

    THE LINCOLN MINUTE MAN DISPATCH

    Volume 35 To be Responsible and Useful Citizens by Our Teaching and Example August 2002

    NEED A GOOD QUOTE

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

September Muster:

    Join us Tuesday, Sept. 3rd, 7:30 PM at Pierce House for the first Muster of the 2002-2003

    season. The Captain promises to bring goodies!

     thLincoln 250 Town Birthday Brainstorming

    Lincoln will celebrate its 250th birthday coming up on April 19th 2004. The Town is in the process of devising ways to celebrate, and all town organizations have been urged to consider their own contribution.

    In the words of our Historian, Mike Ryan, “Obviously a Lincoln minute company did not exist in 1754. However, the LMM today I would guess represent the 1775 minute company AND the town's militia of which they were a part. Thus today's MM would be representatives of the 1754 Lincoln militia and have a place in any birthday recognition.”

    To this end, the Captain invites any interested members of Lincoln Company to join him at his home in Weston, Thursday, Sept 5, 7:30PM to contemplate the possibilities over some

    suds. RSVP the Captain at 781-899-0933.

Fort Ticonderoga Details

    Want to see historic Fort Ticonderoga and view a commemorative skirmish? Mary Harder

    has made arrangements for participating Lincoln Minute Men participate at the Fort Ticonderoga event, Friday through Sunday, Sept. 6-8th. For more information, contact the Captain or Mary

    Harder at 781-891-5949.

Sudbury Colonial Fair is Saturday, September 28

    1:15 PM Opening Parade at the Wayside Inn, Sudbury

    1:30-4 PM Fife and drum music by the Lincoln Minute Men and other invited companies.

     Sutlers, craft booths, and food aplenty during this afternoon of colonial music.

    Coordinators: Don Hafner

Hartwell Halloween becoming a Local Tradition

    Company Historian Mike Ryan writes: “If any Lincolnites are interested in telling 18th Century or other time period ghost stories (especially related to Lincoln) at Mark Nichepor's annual "Hartwell Halloween", please let me know.” Mike always tells a few stories (the missing British soldier's skulls, the Gloucester witch Meg Wesson and the battle of Louisburg in 1745). A Civil War soldier tells stories and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is often read.

    It is a fun time; lots of families and children, candlelight, and an outdoor bonfire. Attendance is usually well over 100 people. Program begins at 7pm and runs about 2 hours. .

    Mike can be reached at D_MichaelRyan@email.msn.com

A Jocobite Air at the Concord Fight?

     ―The White Cockade‖ – A popular Scottish tune based on the song ―My Love Was Born

    in Aberdeen‖ with one of many sets of words penned by Robert Burns. During the 1745 Jacobite uprising, would be king ―Bonnie Prince Charlie‖ Stuart plucked a white rose and placed it on his bonnet as a symbol of rebellion. And so it was written ―He takes the Field wi‘ his White Cockade.‖

     Some 30 years later, the musical piece would find its way to another rebellion in the colony of Massachusetts on 19 April 1775. At least that is what tradition indicates. But was the tune played and if so, at what point during the day, where and by whom?

     Primary source materials (including witness depositions and writings both British military and colonial) are lacking in reference to music played at the Concord Fight. Neither Rev. Ripley‘s 1827 ―Fight at Concord‖ nor Lemuel Shattuck‘s 1835 ―History of Concord‖ mention ―The White Cockade‖. It is only found in Charles Handley‘s 1 December 1835 deposition where thhe (being age 13 on April 19 and at the Widow Brown‘s tavern a mile from North Bridge)

    states, ―They (Capt. Davis‘s Acton company) marched quite fast to the music of a fife and drum. I remember the tune, but am not sure of its name… I think it was called The White Cockade‖. Handley whistled the notes which were verified by the listener to be the song in question. Hence, it appears that this recollection coupled with family tradition and some speculative folklore, led to the 1875 Centennial fame of ―The White Cockade‖.

     Reference to the song appears in Frederick Hudson‘s May 1875 Harper‘s New Monthly Magazine article ―Concord Fight‖; in the 1879 Drake‘s History of Middlesex County article on Acton by Rev. Wood; in an 1893 ―Boston Globe‖ remembrance story by Luke Smith who

    recalled his Acton father Solomon (a participant) noting ―The White Cockade‖; and by thnumerous 20 Century authors ( including Coburn, Murdock, Gross, Galvin, Fischer) all of

    to Luther Blanchard Fifer of the whom use the previously listed sources. In his 1899 ―Memorial

    Acton Minute Men April 19, 1775‖, Alfred S. Hudson wrote of ―The White Cockade‖ being played on the Acton march to Concord, the movement to the Bridge, during the British Regulars‘ retreat and at day‘s end. However, no specific sources are mentioned but several qualifiers

    (doubtlessly, suppose, suggest, may have) appear.

     ―Memorial‖ is most colorful and descriptive in displaying the situations under which the Scottish tune was played and thus presents a memorable if possibly fictitious account. Hudson provides no sources but states that the Cockade was used as a ―signature tune‖ of the Acton Minute Men as ―they strode along‖ toward Concord and ―advanced down the hill‖ against the Regulars on the Bridge.

    The first question to arise is when exactly was ―The White Cockade‖ played on 19 April?

    Handley‘s deposition clearly indicates hearing it as Acton passes Brown‘s tavern and seems to be the only eyewitness account addressing a specific song at a specific time. At the Bridge site, there are those who believe that due to fear and the solemnity of the moment, no music was struck while others feel that under the circumstance, a stirring, martial tune would have been performed to lift spirits and provide a disciplined appearance to the colonial column. If the latter was correct, perhaps ―The White Cockade‖ (known by musicians, soldiers and populace alike to be a rebellious Jacobite song taunting to Crown troops) would have been appropriate.

     A second question arising asks who (if anyone) played ―Cockade‖ as the colonials

    advanced on the Bridge? Acton had a fifer Luther Blanchard and drummer Francis Barker (they most likely knew the song and played it on the march to Concord) counted among some 11 musicians possibly in the colonial ranks. Accounts differ as to which of them struck up music but most credit either Blanchard alone; Blanchard and Barker; two Acton fifers; or Blanchard and a Concord fifer John Buttrick, Jr.. But alas, no primary source substantiates an answer including British military eyewitness accounts.

     Several interesting asides present themselves in this matter of ―The White Cockade‖ on 19 April. One writer Fairfax Downey has the tune being played by the Lexington fifer as his

    company marches from its morning tragedy toward Concord and by both colonial and British Regular musicians when their columns met and march into Concord center about 7am. No sources are listed. In the 1745 Battle of Fontenoy, France, pipers led the joint French/Irish army against the English/Scottish force while playing ―The White Cockade‖. Months later the Jacobite threbellion‘s end came at Culloden participated in by the 4 Regiment ―The King‘s Own‖ which

    on 19 April 1775 held the Concord Bridge, fired the historic volley, took the heaviest casualties (3 dead) and most likely heard ―The White Cockade‖ (again) if it was played.

     Still, wonder exists as to why this Scottish song would be a ―signature tune of the Acton Minute Men‖, a ―familiar air to the dwellers of the vicinity‖ or a ―favorite‖ of Captain Davis,

    particularly as there appears to be no local connections to the 1745 Jacobite uprising. It is true that the song was one of rebellion, popular with military and civilian musicians and audiences on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, was found in music books of the period and was a lively tune for marching. Yet with some 500 witnesses at the Bridge, why would not one deem it appropriate (especially among the King‘s men) to comment on music or ―The White Cockade‖, unless its notes were not played?

     As occurs all too often in addressing minor footnotes to major historical events, clarity and abundance of witness accounts are lacking and fact tends to be bolstered by tradition, myth, hearsay, supposition or embellishment. Such may be the case with ―The White Cockade‖ at the

    Bridge Fight, a situation not unlike to that of whether or not ―The World Turned Upside Down‖ was actually played at the Yorktown surrender.

     At least Handley‘s deposition supports ―Cockade‖ played by Acton men on the way to Concord even if its strands may never be substantiated at the Bridge. It is doubtful however that such lack of evidence will deter the traditional playing of ―The White Cockade‖ during ceremonies, reenactments or Patriots‘ Day parades in Concord and at North Bridge. Such it is

    with history and the story of a Scottish air of rebellion.

    D. Michael Ryan is company historian with the Concord and Lincoln Minute Men, an th18 Century volunteer history interpreter with the National Park Service and associate dean of students at Boston College.

―Remember the Ladies‖

    Barbara Delorey of 18cWoman and Rhonda McConnon of www.18cNewEnglandLife.org have joined forces to create '18c New England Woman.” Their goal is to create a series of

    programs and a Winter Lecture Series to begin to understand the lives of New England women.

    The next one is on October 19th at Hartwell. According to Rhonda, there is plenty of

    room for everyone here ...whether you're interested in hanging back and watching what others are doing or looking for new ideas and/or challenges. “We will ask that everyone in time develop a persona to look at 18th c NE through. The idea is to really try to begin to understand these women by learning about them and sharing that information. Our clothing standards are sent out to those requesting to join us.”

    Contact Rhonda if you have any questions at mrkmcc@attbi.com.

To Serve at the Pleasure of the Company

    The Nominating Committee is assembling a slate of candidates for the annual election of Company officers at the September muster. Many thanks to Rick Wiggin, Dave White, and Don Hafner for putting together the slate.

    The rosters of the Lincoln Minute Men from the time of the Revolution show that the officers‘ positions were passed around among members of the community and seldom held by

    the same person for more than a year. It is a fine historical tradition, and one you can participate in. The Nominating Committee will be seeking volunteers to fill positions, but you don‘t have to wait for them to come to you. The good that the Lincoln Minute Men do in the community, and the fun that we all have, is made possible by those among your comrades who have stepped forward and said, ―Yes, I‘ll do that for this year.‖ The tasks are not burdensome, and friends will always pitch in to help. So how about it? Will you speak up and volunteer? Please do. You will enjoy the support and respect of the entire Company.

The Summer Campaigns of 2002

    We asked those on the Company email list to tell us how they spent the summer, with a one-word summary description. We got these replies.

    George General: I have been in Layton, UT and Las Vegas, NV installing networks for the Air Force. In NYC to attend a friend's wedding. While in NYC we went [very emotional visit] to Ground Zero. I've missed most of the fife and drum activity for the year, but I hope to be home soon and back at making lots of noise.

    Donald Hafner: Where did we go? To the Canadian Rockies. What did we do? We hiked (some of it through the 4-foot snowfall that happened in mid-June), biked, and canoed. Short description? Canadians are charming -- that Tory influence?

    Tim Hayes: Went to Chicago for the 4th and then to Philly on the 17th of Aug for a wedding What did we do? Sweated a lot in Philly...hot, hot, hot...

    Ruth Hodges, John LeClaire: -where did you go on your vacation? Alaska -what did you do? lived on a boat, hiked & kayaked-what one word (OK, I'll give you 2-3 words) describes the experience? awe-inspiring

    Jim Hogan: its hard to describe vacation when last year i didn't have one and this year business took me to hawaii twice and australia once but I did take my parents to hawaii for 13 days and we are now enroute to 7 days in the white mountains of new hampshire followed by a cruise from Seattle to Alaska. We are enjoying family while we still can

    Robert and Ana Holzbach: Vacation: Five week tour of Europe including mountain climbing in the Swiss Alps, wine drinking in Italy, Globe theatre going in London, and general carousing in the Czech Republic. What 3 words describes the experience?: Final Childless Vacation. It will be great to see you all again! However, Ana will be a bit bigger than you remember.

    Steve Humphrey: humbled at the New England PHRF sailing championships in Marblehead. Roadster project underway. Still paying price from church visit to Nicaragua. Retired from Hewlett Packard.

    Steve and Phoebe McCarthy: 10 days in Friendship, Maine, then we took young Stephen to Montreal for a week of camp. Will return via Fort Ticonderoga when we pick him up.

    Peter McLearn: Summer vacation(s)/trips: 3days2nightsWoodenBoatshow Maine. 4days3nightsCruisingCapeCod Bay. Both Awesome.

    Fred and Inge Richardson: Two (separate) weeks on the Cape at Eastham, with another in late September. We swam, sailed, and loafed.

    Tom Risser: Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, 29 Palms, California -- in the Mojave. Provided tender care for my beloved Men in Green. Shot off a 155 mm howitzer -- helluva kick -- my shoulder's still sore... In the war game, we did well, and triumphed once again over those pricks who were pretending to

    invade our revered desert.

    Mike Ryan: My "vacation" consists of long (3-4 day) weekends generally most of which are spent in the Park (a record breaking 300 hours plus this year). One "event" was my week at Marine Base Quantico, VA to observe several of my BC student/officer candidates in training. I elected to "participate" (ropes courses, obstacle courses, leadership courses ... began running 2-3 miles per day again and have continued... losing 25 pounds). Showed those Marines and youngsters what a 58 year old Army Infantry Ranger Captain could still do in his jungle fatigues.

    Combined with my Combat Infantrymen's Badge and the fact that I had Marines sergeants on my 'Nam advisory team and had participated in USMC amphib training at Marine Base Little Creek, VA, I had Colonels saluting me!!! One word ... "Hooah"!

The First Muster of the Season!

    Remember Tuesday, September 3rd, 7:30 p.m. at Pierce House. See you there!

    THE LINCOLN MINUTE MAN DISPATCH

    Volume 36 To be Responsible and Useful Citizens by Our Teaching and Example September 2002

    ―With wintertime upon us, there is the opportunity for a respite from the heavy

    labor of the harvest. The season of fun and frolic is about to begin..‖

     Debra Friedman

     Old Sturbridge Visitor

     Winter 2001

    ______________________________________________________________________________

    _____

September Muster :

     Pierce House, September 3 at 7:30 PM.

     This should be a nice chance to informally introduce ourselves to the people in town, (maybe do a little educating, a little recruiting.) Most of the time town folk just get to see us marching through their front or back yards or at least at parade rest from a distance. There should be a lot of youngsters around. A lot of good food, too (make your own ice cream sundae were popular last time we went).

     The next muster in February will be a little more casual also. It will be held at the now

    generally biannual Colonial Dinner. Everyone associated with the company and their families are welcome. We are hoping to get some of the past and semi-retired members to come too. It should be a fun, informal feast, with some entertainment, also. So start looking for the most authentic recipes you can find. The library has some good colonial cook books. Don Hafner or Mary Harder may be calling you soon to see what you have in mind. So we don‘t end up thbringing the same food. The dinner will be Sat., Feb. 9 at 7pm at the Pierce House.

    (which was well attended by 13 The highlight of the December muster,

    members for such a cool dark night) besides updating the schedule for the up-coming year, was a little video brought in by our historian and president of the Battle Road Association- Mike Ryan. (They had a nice article about him in the local paper recently). This was the first public viewing of the video outside of the association. It was well done, and meant to explain the need to protect the Battle Road Park from encroachment of different kinds (airport, traffic, modernization,etc.). The video is planned to be sent to influential groups, businesses, and politicians around the country. We also happen to be one of the star performers in it.

     Our annual financial report looked fairly sound. Our largest expense was music lessons, but the music program also produced the most income. Dues pretty much just pay for the mailings and basic office expenses. So please pay you dues if you have not, for the coming year. Our fiscal year starts in September, so we are a good way through it already.

     The company would very much like to have some more help coordinating school visits for the

    coming season. They are an integral part of our duties although they take place during the week, which is hard for some of us. They are very worthwhile for the classes as well as for the participants.

     Mike Ryan has plenty of activities and educational opportunities available at the park this winter if any one has some free weekends.

     A little information about our Guidon from our historian, Mike Ryan.

     FLAGS OF MANY TYPES WERE CARRIED

    THROUGHOUT HISTORY INCLUDING BY THE

    COLONISTS. POLES WERE OF WOOD

    GENERALLY. FOR ALL OF ITS FAULTS AND MYTHS,

    THE BEDFORD FLAG IS A GOOD EXAMPLE OF AN

    EARLY 18TH CENTURY (NOT 17TH CENTURY)

    HORSE TROOP COLOUR. COLONIALS CARRIED FLAGS REPRESENTING VARIOUS CAUSES... LIBERTY BEING

     UNIT "GUIDONS" OF ANY THE MOST PROMINENT.

    TYPE AT THE TIME OF 1775 ARE MOST UNLIKELY.

    THERE EXISTS NO DOCUMENTATION (ORIGINAL AND PRIMARY) THAT ANY COLOURS WERE CARRIED ON THE FIELD IN LEXINGTON OR CONCORD BY EITHER

    SIDE ON 19 APRIL. I WONDERED ABOUT THE MARCH DATE AND DON HAS EXPLAINED IT. IT WAS

    NOT THE DATE OF THE FOUNDING OF THE

    MINUTE COMPANY NOR OF THE ELECTION OF ITS OFFICERS. CONCORD MINUTE MEN HAD THE SAME

    PROBLEM... DISPLAYING A DATE BUT NOT THE

    DATE OF ITS FIRST MINUTE COMPANY (MILES')

    FOUNDING. I CORRECTED THIS WITH AN

    EXPLANATORY ARTICLE SOME YEARS AGO.

    REENACTED UNIT GUIDONS ARE A PRODUCT OF THE BICENTENNIAL ERA AND USED FOR IDENTIFICATION,

    CEREMONY AND

    ESPRIT DE CORPS. ALUMINUM IS CHEAP, LIGHT AND

    ONE DOES NOT HAVE TO WAIT YEARS FOR IT TO

    GROW TO THE PROPER SIZE FOR A POLE!

    WILL DO SOME MORE LOOKING! BEST WISHES FOR

    A BLESSED HOLIDAY SEASON AND A HEALTHY,

    HAPPY, MEMORABLE 2002.

    THE LINCOLN MINUTE MAN DISPATCH

    Volume 35 To be Responsible and Useful Citizens by Our Teaching and Example December 2001

    ―With wintertime upon us, there is the opportunity for a respite from the heavy

    labor of the harvest. The season of fun and frolic is about to begin..‖

     Debra Friedman

     Old Sturbridge Visitor

     Winter 2001

    ______________________________________________________________________________

    _____

January Muster :

     An early start to the year. JAN. 1st at 1:30 PM. In uniform please, instruments at the ready,

    muskets optional. For the last couple of years Lincoln has held an open-house at the Pierce House, (our regular meeting spot) on New Years Day. It just happens to be the first Tuesday of the month (our regular muster day.)

     This should be a nice chance to informally introduce ourselves to the people in town, (maybe do a little educating, a little recruiting.) Most of the time town folk just get to see us marching through their front or back yards or at least at parade rest from a distance. There should be a lot of youngsters around. A lot of good food, too (make your own ice cream sundae

    were popular last time we went).

     The next muster in February will be a little more casual also. It will be held at the now generally biannual Colonial Dinner. Everyone associated with the company and their families are welcome. We are hoping to get some of the past and semi-retired members to come too. It should be a fun, informal feast, with some entertainment, also. So start looking for the most authentic recipes you can find. The library has some good colonial cook books. Don Hafner or Mary Harder may be calling you soon to see thwhat you have in mind. So we don‘t end up bringing the same food. The dinner will be Sat., Feb. 9 at

    7pm at the Pierce House.

     The highlight of the December muster, (which was well attended by 13

    members for such a cool dark night) besides updating the schedule for the up-coming year, was a little video brought in by our historian and president of the Battle Road Association- Mike Ryan. (They had a nice article about him in the local paper recently). This was the first public viewing of the video outside of the association. It was well done, and meant to explain the need to protect the Battle Road Park from encroachment of different kinds (airport, traffic, modernization,etc.). The video is planned to be sent to influential groups, businesses, and politicians around the country. We also happen to be one of the star performers in it.

     Our annual financial report looked fairly sound. Our largest expense was music lessons, but the

    music program also produced the most income. Dues pretty much just pay for the mailings and basic office expenses. So please pay you dues if you have not, for the coming year. Our fiscal year starts in September, so we are a good way through it already.

     The company would very much like to have some more help coordinating school visits for the

    coming season. They are an integral part of our duties although they take place during the week, which is hard for some of us. They are very worthwhile for the classes as well as for the participants.

     Mike Ryan has plenty of activities and educational opportunities available at the park this winter if any one has some free weekends.

     A little information about our Guidon from our historian, Mike Ryan.

     Flags of many types were carried throughout history including by the colonists. Poles were of wood generally. For all of its faults and myths, the Bedford Flag is a good example of an early 18th Century (not 17th Century) horse troop colour. Colonials carried flags representing various causes... liberty being the most prominent. Unit "guidons" of any type at the time of 1775 are most unlikely. There exists no documentation (original and primary) that any colours were carried on the field in Lexington or Concord by either side on 19 April. I wondered about the March date and Don has explained it. It was not the date of the founding of the

    minute company nor of the election of its officers. Concord Minute Men had the same problem... displaying A date but not THE date of its first minute company (Miles') founding. I corrected this with

    an explanatory article some years ago. Reenacted unit guidons are a product of the Bicentennial era and used for identification, ceremony and

    esprit de corps. Aluminum is cheap, light and one does not have to wait years for it to grow to the proper size for a pole!

    Will do some more looking! Best wishes for a blessed holiday season and a healthy, happy, memorable 2002.

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