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Table of Contents

    Title 28 EDUCATION

    Title 28 EDUCATION

    Table of Contents

    Part LXXVII. Bulletin 105―Louisiana Content Standards for

    Programs Serving Four-Year Old Children

    Chapter 1. General Provisions ............................................................................................................. 1 ?101. Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 ?103. Louisiana Content Standards Foundation Skills ...................................................................... 1

    ?105. Information Literacy Model for Lifelong Learning ................................................................. 2

    ?107. Definitions ............................................................................................................................. 2 Chapter 3. Pre-Kindergarten Content Standards ................................................................................... 4 Subchapter A. General ........................................................................................................................... 4 ?301. Content Standards .................................................................................................................. 4 ?303. Developmentally Appropriate Practices ................................................................................. 5 Subchapter B. Mathematics ................................................................................................................... 5 ?305. Mathematical Development .................................................................................................... 5 ?307. Stages of Math Development .................................................................................................. 6 ?309. Cognitive Math Development ................................................................................................. 7 Subchapter C. Science .......................................................................................................................... 9 ?311. Scientific Development .......................................................................................................... 9 ?313. Cognitive Science Development ........................................................................................... 10 Subchapter D. Social Studies ............................................................................................................... 12 ?315. Social Studies Development ................................................................................................. 12 ?317. Cognitive Social Studies Development ................................................................................. 13 Subchapter E. Creative Arts ............................................................................................................... 14 ?319. Creative Arts Development .................................................................................................. 14 ?321. Stages of Art Development ................................................................................................... 14 ?323. Creative Arts Development .................................................................................................. 15 Subchapter F. Health and Physical Development ................................................................................ 18 ?325. Health and Physical Development ........................................................................................ 18 ?327. Health and Physical Development ........................................................................................ 19 Subchapter G. Language and Literacy ................................................................................................. 21 ?329. Language and Literacy Development ................................................................................... 21

    ?331. Beginning Reading Skills ..................................................................................................... 21 ?333. Stages of Written Language Development ............................................................................ 22

    ?335. Language and Literacy Development ................................................................................... 23

    Subchapter H. Social and Emotional ................................................................................................... 26 ?337. Social and Emotional Development ...................................................................................... 26 ?339. Social and Emotional Development ...................................................................................... 27

    Table of Contents

    Chapter 5. Pre-K Standards at-a-Glance ............................................................................................ 30 ?501. Cognitive Development ........................................................................................................ 30 ?503. Creative Arts Development .................................................................................................. 31 ?505. Health and Physical Development ........................................................................................ 31 ?507. Language and Literacy Development ................................................................................... 32

    ?509. Social and Emotional Development ...................................................................................... 32

    Title 28

    EDUCATION

    Part LXXVII. Bulletin 105―Louisiana Content Standards for

    Programs Serving Four-Year Old Children

    Chapter 1. General Provisions educational experiences for children and for program

    development and implementation. Early care and education ?101. Introduction program staff must agree on what it is they expect children

    to know and be able to do, within the context of child growth A. The Louisiana Content Standards for Programs and development. With this knowledge, early childhood staff Serving Four-Year-Old Children document was developed can make sound decisions about appropriate curriculum for by a committee of educators from across the state. The the group and for individual children. committee consisted of representatives of higher education

    institutions, technical colleges, childcare, Head Start, 6. Families are the primary caregivers and educators Department of Social Services, and the Department of of their young children. Families should be aware of Health and Hospitals, as well as representatives from local programmatic goals and experiences that should be provided school system administrators and classroom teachers. The for children and expectations for children's performance by standards were designed to address the needs of all children the end of the preschool years. Program staff and families in all settings. There are a number of principles that guided should work collaboratively to ensure that children are the development of the document. [These Guiding provided optimal learning experiences. Programs must Principles were reprinted with permission from the provide families with the information they may need to Connecticut State Department of Education Preschool support children's learning and development. Curriculum Framework and Benchmarks for Children in 7. Young children learn through active exploration of Preschool Programs (May 1999).] their environment through children-initiated and teacher-

    1. Early learning and development are selected activities. The early childhood environment should multidimensional; developmental domains are highly provide opportunities for children to explore materials and interrelated. Development in one domain influences the engage in concrete activities, and to interact with peers and development in other domains. For example, children's adults in order to construct their own understanding about language skills impact their ability to engage in social the world around them. There should therefore be a range of interactions. Therefore, developmental domains cannot be approaches to maximize children's learning. considered in isolation of each other. The dynamic AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. interaction of all areas of development must be considered. 17:6.A(10).

    HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of 2. Young children are capable and competent. All Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2313 (November children are capable of positive developmental outcomes. 2003). Therefore, there should be high expectations for all young

    children. ?103. Louisiana Content Standards Foundation Skills

    3. There are individual differences in rates of A. The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force has development among children. Each child is unique in the developed the following foundation skills, which should rate of growth and the development of skills and apply to all students in all disciplines. competencies. Some children may have a developmental Citizenship―the application of the understanding of the delay or disability that may require program staff to adapt ideals, rights, and responsibilities of active participation in a expectations of individual children or adapt experiences so democratic republic that includes working respectfully and that they will be successful in attaining the performance productively together for the benefit of the individual and standard. Additionally, each child is raised in a cultural the community; being accountable for one's choices and context that may impact a child's acquisition of certain skills actions and understanding their impact on oneself and others; and competencies. knowing one's civil, constitutional, and statutory rights; and

    4. Children will exhibit a range of skills and mentoring others to become productive citizens and lifelong competencies in any domain of development. Preschool age learners. children will exhibit a range of skills and competencies in Communication―a process by which information is any area of development. All children within an age group exchanged and a concept of "meaning" is created and shared should not be expected to master each skill to the same between individuals through a common system of symbols, degree of proficiency at the same time. signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate

    5. Knowledge of child growth and development and clearly, fluently, strategically, technologically, critically, and consistent expectations are essential to maximize creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This

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    for Lifelong Learning is a framework that teachers at all process can best be accomplished through use of the levels can apply to help students become independent following skills: reading, speaking, listening, viewing, and lifelong learners. visually representing.

    1. Defining/Focusing. The first task is to recognize Linking and Generating Knowledge―the effective use that an information need exists. Students make preliminary of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across decisions about the type of information needed based on the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to prior knowledge. engage in the principles of continual improvement, students

    must be able to transfer and elaborate on these processes. 2. Selecting Tools and Resources. After students "Transfer" refers to the ability to apply a strategy or in-decide what information is needed, they then develop search content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other strategies for locating and accessing appropriate, relevant than that in which it was originally learned. "Elaboration" sources in the school library media center, community refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into libraries and agencies, resource people, and others as other contexts. appropriate.

    Problem-Solving―the identification of an obstacle or 3. Extracting and Recording. Students examine the challenge and the subsequent application of knowledge and resources for readability, currency, usefulness, and bias. This thinking processes, which include reasoning, decision-task involves skimming or listening for key words, making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using "chunking" reading, finding main ideas, and taking notes. multiple pathways, even when no routine path is apparent. 4. Processing Information. After recording Resource Access and Utilization―the process of information, students must examine and evaluate the data in identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to order to utilize the information by categorizing, analyzing, help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating evaluating, and comparing for bias, inadequacies, omissions, information. The identification and employment of errors, and value judgments. Based on their findings, they appropriate tools, techniques, and technologies are essential either move on to the next step or do additional research. to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, 5. Organizing Information. Students effectively sort, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word processors, manipulate, and organize the information that was retrieved. computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and They make decisions on how to use and communicate their other emerging technologies. findings. NOTE: These foundation skills were developed by the Louisiana Content Standards Task Force in 1997. This task force developed 6. Presenting Findings. Students apply and the State Standards for Curriculum Development for kindergarten through grade 12. communicate what they have learned (e.g., research report,

    project, illustration, dramatization, portfolio, book, book AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. report, map, oral/audio/visual presentation, game, 17:6.A(10). bibliography, hyper stack). HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of

    Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2314 (November 7. Evaluating Efforts. Throughout the information 2003). problem solving process, students evaluate their efforts. This ?105. Information Literacy Model for Lifelong assists students in determining the effectiveness of the

    research process. The final product may be evaluated by the Learning

    teacher and other qualified or interested resource persons. A. Students must become competent and independent

    AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. users of information to be productive citizens of the 21st 17:6.A(10). century. They must be prepared to live in an information-rich HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of and changing global society. Due to the rapid growth of Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2314 (November technology, the amount of information available is 2003). accelerating so quickly that teachers are no longer able to

    ?107. Definitions impart a complete knowledge base in a subject area. In

    addition, students entering the workforce must know how to Accommodations―changes in the curricular material and access information, solve problems, make decisions, and experiences to accommodate a child's particular needs. work as part of a team. Therefore, information literacy, the Adaptations are not intended to alter the difficulty of the ability to recognize an information need and then locate, skill or area of development addressed. Such adaptations evaluate, and effectively use the needed information, is a may enable children with disabilities to have experiences basic skill essential to the 21st century workplace and home. similar to those of their peers. Information literate students are self-directed learners, who,

    Child-Initiated Activities―children are able to select their individually or collaboratively, use information responsibly

    own centers, activities, materials, and companions, and are to create quality products and to be productive citizens.

    able to manage their own play independently. There is adult Information literacy skills must not be taught in isolation;

    interaction in response to the children's developmental needs, they must be integrated across all content areas, utilizing

    as well as to introduce and reinforce concepts. This is also fully the resources of the classroom, the school library media

    called free play. (Note: When children are assigned to center, and the community. The Information Literacy Model

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centers by staff or the staff selects the activities, materials, Head Start Child Outcomes Framework―this framework

    etc., for the children, this is not considered a child-initiated is intended to guide Head Start Programs in the ongoing or free play activity.) assessment of the progress and accomplishments of children.

    The eight general Domains serve as building blocks that are Concrete Hands-On Learning Experiences―learning important for school success. The domains include: experiences that emphasize choice, free exploration, Language Development, Literacy, Mathematics, Science, interaction, and authenticity within a relevant and Creative Arts, Social and Emotional Development, meaningful context. Such experiences emphasize the Approaches to Learning and Physical and Health development of children's thinking, reasoning, decision-Development. making and problem-solving abilities. Curriculum areas and

    skills are integrated in the context of the learning activities Head Start Performance Standards―these standards used

    and experiences as opposed to being taught in isolation. in Head Start Programs are based on sound child

    development principles about how children grow and learn. Content Practice Standards―describes the broad The varied experiences provided by the program support the outcomes that children should achieve through a high-continuum of children's growth and development in all quality preschool experience. Each Content Practice domains. Standard is aligned with the Louisiana K-4 Content

    Standards and other relevant state and national standards. Indicators―define a Content Practice Standard more

    specifically so that it can be measured. Each indicator is Developmental Profile―specifies what most preschool coded by domain, content area and skill. For example, PK-children should be able to know and be able to do by the end CM-N1 means Pre-Kindergarten-Cognitive Math-Number 1. of their preschool experiences.

    Interest Center―an area in the classroom used during free Developmentally Appropriate Practice―quality care and play/ child-initiated activities. In each area, the materials are education of young children based on: organized by type and are stored so that they are accessible

    to the children, shelves have picture/word labels, and the 1. knowledge of how children develop and learn. This

    area is appropriately furnished. Interest centers can also be includes information about ages and stages of development

    established outdoors. as well as what materials, activities and interactions are

    important for each; Louisiana Literacy Profileprovides teachers of children

    in grades K-3 with the means of observing and recording 2. knowledge of the individual child, including

    progress in a continuum of growth that is based on literacy disabilities; and

    behaviors. It informs instruction and promotes development 3. knowledge about the social, cultural and familial of literacy behaviors. cultural context in which children are growing up.

    Manipulatives―materials that allow children to explore, Domain―describe the aspect of development for each experiment, and interact by using their hands or by standard. content areas are specified for each domain. mechanical means. These learning materials promote

    dexterity and eye-hand coordination while promoting Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised

    problem-solving and higher levels of critical thinking. Such (ECERS-R)―a reliable and valid research based program

    items include, but are not limited to, beads and laces, puzzles, quality assessment instrument. This scale is designed for use

    small blocks, playdoh, lacing cards, and items that can be in classrooms serving children 2 1/2 to 5 years of age. It is

    snapped, zipped or hooked together to name a few. used to evaluate classroom environment as well as

    programmatic and interpersonal features that directly affect Modifications―limiting, restricting, or altering materials, children and adults in the early childhood setting. The seven the environment or experiences without fundamentally sub-scales of the ECERS-R include: Space and Furnishings, changing the outcome or use of such. Modifications may Personal Care Routines, Language-Reasoning, Activities, enable children who are experiencing difficulty with a Interactions, Program Structure, and Parents and Staff. particular skill or an area of development to successfully

    achieve competence in these areas. Examples of Emerging Skills―skills or abilities, which are not shown

    modifications include offering a variety of levels of puzzles as being mastered but are present in a modified or limited

    such as interlocking and pegged puzzles. form. Attention to emerging skills allows teachers to assess

    the developmental process and progress of students. Multisensory Experiences―experiences that allow Additionally, a focus on emerging skills is important in the children to respond to physical stimuli relating to more than planning of the environment and activities to facilitate one of the five senses. Included in these types of experiences development of skills. would be cooking activities where the senses of sight, smell,

    taste, touch and hearing would all be involved. Examples―tips on how to structure the curriculum and

    environment to assist a child's optimal performance. National Association for the Education of Young Children

    (NAEYC)―links to the Louisiana Content Standards for Free Play―see Child-Initiated Activity.

    Programs Serving Four-Year Olds are related to NAEYC's Grapheme―the smallest part of written language that Guide to Accreditation (1998) which is a compilation of self-represents a phoneme in the spelling of a word.

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    studies designed to guide programs through the accreditation Print Concepts―materials, activities, and props, etc. that process. prompt the ongoing process of becoming literate; that is,

    learning to read and write. Print concepts include exposure Non-Standard Units of Measurement―methods of to textual information through books, stories, field trips, measurement that do not include traditional means such as notes, labels, signs, chants, etc., and should be part of the rulers, scales, clocks, etc. Non-standard units of emergent-literacy environment of all preschool classrooms. measurement allow children to explore and thus understand

    the concept of measurement without being tied to exact Props―materials used throughout the classroom to extend numerical data. Items such as pieces of string, rows of learning in any one of the interest areas or centers. Props blocks or pencils may serve as non-standard units to measure added to an interest center are generally placed in the area in length; balances may help promote understanding of varying addition to standards items. Examples of props include: weights, and picture-graphs of daily routines allow children puppets that correlate with stories in the library center or to understand the concept of time and passage of time. phone books and recipe cards in the dramatic play center.

    Such props allow children to engage in activities in which Non-Textual Information―information expressed through they can interact with other children, share and take turns, the use of pictures, symbols or icons. Such information may role-play and exercise their imaginations. Additionally, be used by children to process information and to create props added to interest centers help children accept mental images symbolic of real-world situations without the responsibility for clean-up, break barriers for sex/culture use of written text. stereotyping, and deal with age/stage personal relations. Onset―this is a part of spoken language that is smaller Rime―the part of a syllable that contains the vowel and than a syllable but larger than a phoneme. It is the initial all that follows it (the rime of bag is ag; of swim, -im). consonant sound of a syllable (The onset of bag is b-; of

    swim, sw-). Self-help Tasks or Skills―these skills or tasks comprise a

    large portion of a young child's daily living tasks and are Open-Ended Questioning―questioning that promotes a important in all areas of development. These skills include child's development as opposed to mere information toileting, serving and eating meals and snacks, cleaning up gathering. This method of questioning is used to motivate their environment and grooming and dressing. children to learn, inquire about and discover their world.

    Open-ended questioning prompts students to think about Skill Area―defines each content area more specifically. their responses and requires a more in-depth level of critical Spatial Sense or Spatial Awareness―the sense of thinking in order to respond. These questions help the orienting to one's environment. A sense of awareness of student to recognize a problem, analyze contributing factors directionality as well as the child's relationship to self, the and to consider a choice of optimal solutions. Open-ended environment and others in that environment. questions are characterized by the words "What if?",

    "How?" , "What would happen if?", "Why do you think?", Substantial Portion of the Day―free play/child-initiated

    "Is there another way?" etc. activities are available to the children at least one third or 35

    percent of the instructional day. Example: During a 6 hour Phoneme―the smallest part of spoken language that instructional day, these activities are available at least 2 makes a difference in the meaning of words. hours of the instructional day. Phonemic Awareness―the ability to hear, identify, and Syllable―a part of a word that contains a vowel or, in manipulate the individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken spoken language, a vowel sound. words. A child who possesses phonemic awareness can

    segment sounds in words and blend strings of isolate sounds Teacher-Directed Activity―the activities and/or materials together to form recognizable words. are chosen for the children by the teacher to engage in

    educational interaction with small groups and individual Phonological Awarenessa broad term that includes children as well as with the whole group. (Examples: read a phonemic awareness. In addition to phonemes, phonological story, cooking activity, or science activity.) awareness activities can involve work with rhymes, words, AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. syllables, and other onsets and rimes. 17:6.A(10). Play-Based Environment―a teaching-learning interactive HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of environment through which play is the medium that children Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2315 (November 2003). learn and make sense of their world. It provides a forum for

    children to learn to deal with the world on a symbolic level Chapter 3. Pre-Kindergarten the foundation for all subsequent intellectual development.

    Content Standards In a play-based environment, children have the opportunity

    to gain a variety of social, emotional and physical skills. Subchapter A. General This type of environment is in contrast to the environment

    where learning is compartmentalized into the traditional ?301. Content Standards content areas and children have little opportunity to actively

    explore, experiment and interact. A. This Section contains content standards, which are

    organized alphabetically into five domains of development.

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1. Cognitive development:

    a. Mathematical development;

    b. Science development;

    c. Social Studies development;

    ? Actively engaged learners ? Passive quiet learners 2. Creative Arts development; ? Language and talking ? Classrooms quiet most of the day encouraged daily 3. Health and Physical development; ? Cozy inviting environments ? Sterile cold environments ? Daily outdoor gross motor ? Recess/Adults are On Duty 4. Language and Literacy development; time/Adults interacting with the children to facilitate learning 5. Social and Emotional development. ? Individual creative art ? Patterned art/Uniform Art expressions projects (all look the same) B. The five developmental domains are designed to be ? Language/Literacy rich ? Alphabet letters taught through interdependent and must be considered as a whole when activities encourage phonological rote drill or Letter of the week awareness considering the development of pre-kindergarten children. ? Hands-on math activities ? Rote drill of numbers, shapes, Each developmental domain includes the following. colors, etc. ? Use a variety of materials ? Same materials and equipment 1. Content Practice Standards―describes the broad changed frequently to meet the used daily throughout the school outcomes that children should achieve a high-quality needs and interests of the children year ? Adult-Child Interactions ? Adult-Child Interactions minimal, preschool experience. encourage learning through open-unpleasant, non-responsive, ended questions, extending inappropriate, or only to control 2. Developmental Profile Indicators―specifies what conversations, reasoning, etc. behavior most pre-kindergarten children should be able to do by the ? Use of TV, videos and ? TV, videos, and computers not end of their pre-kindergarten experience. computers related to classroom related to classroom events, used events, appropriate, limited to short inappropriately, no alternative periods of time and adult activities are used, and no adult 3. Links―Each content practice standard is aligned interaction occurs interaction occurs with the Louisiana K-4 Content Standards and other relevant ? Teacher uses a variety of ? Teacher uses direct instruction to state and national standards. strategies and meaningful activities teach and isolates the skills and to develop skills and concepts concepts C. The content practice standards provide the pre-? Assessment ongoing/Portfolios ? Isolated testing/Worksheets used that include anecdotal records, kindergarten personnel with a common understanding of work samples, photographs, etc. AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. what young children should know and do. It is designed to NOTE: For more Developmentally Appropriate Practices refer to 17:6.A(10). be a guide for designing and implementing a curriculum that ECERS-R, NAEYC guidelines, and Bulletin 741. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of will facilitate learning and skill acquisition in each pre-Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2317 (November kindergarten child. Skills such as letter, numbers, shapes, 2003). colors, etc., should not be taught in isolation, but integrated

    throughout the curriculum. Subchapter B. Mathematics D. The content practice standards and developmental ?305. Mathematical Development profile indicators are based on research in developmentally A. Young children develop mathematical concepts appropriate practice for preschool children. In developing through meaningful and concrete experiences that are these standards, the Accreditation Standards of the National broader in scope than numerals and counting. In an inclusive, Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) developmentally appropriate play-based environment, pre-and the Head Start Performance Standards were reviewed. kindergarten children will have opportunities to acquire and The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale, Revised understand mathematical skills and concepts using hands-on Edition (ECERS-R) was also reviewed and linked to the experiences. They will have access to a wide variety of tools appropriate content practice standards. and technologies that foster the understanding of AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. mathematics in real-life situations. 17:6.A(10).

    HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of B. Early childhood teachers must be flexible during daily Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2316 (November routines and strive to capture teachable moments using 2003). open-ended questioning techniques to expand mathematical

    concepts. These teachers must also facilitate activities that ?303. Developmentally Appropriate Practices

    address and extend young children's developmental levels. Developmentally Appropriate Developmentally Appropriate C. Accommodations for children with special needs: Practices Include: Practices Do Not Include:

    ? Learning centers/Free choice ? Timed rotation/Teacher selected 1. simplify a complicated task by breaking it into centers smaller parts or reducing the number of steps; ? Concrete learning experiences ? Workbooks or ditto sheets with real items 2. use shorter but more frequent activities and routines; ? Balance of student-initiated and ? Teacher-directed activities more teacher-directed activities in than 35% of the instructional day instructional day 3. add new activities and specific activities as needed

    to meet individual needs.

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    1. play number games with understanding; NOTE: Partial participation is considered appropriate for

    2. count objects to 10 and sometimes to 20; children with special needs, according to their abilities.

    AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S. 3. identify the larger of two numbers; 17:6.A(10).

    HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of 4. answer simple questions that require logic; Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2317 (November

    2003). 5. recognize more complex patterns; ?307. Stages of Math Development 6. position words; A. 2-3 Year-Olds: 7. sort forms by shape; 1. begin to understand the use of numbers as they hear 8. compare sizes of familiar objects not in sight; others using them; 9. work multi-piece puzzles. 2. understand the use of numbers through exploring D. 5-6 Year-Olds: objects;

    1. begin to understand concepts represented in 3. work large-piece puzzles; symbolic form; 4. understand direction and relational words; 2. can combine simple sets; 5. recognize geometric shapes, like a circle; 3. begin to add small numbers in their heads; 6. sequence up to three items. 4. rote count to 100 with little confusion; B. 3-4 Year-Olds: 5. count objects to 20 and more; 1. recognize and express quantities like some, more, a 6. understand that the number is a symbol that stands lot, and another; for a certain number of objects; 2. begin to have a sense of time; 7. classify objects by multiple attributes; 3. recognize familiar geometric shapes in the 8. can decide which number comes before, or after, environment; another number. 4. sort objects by one characteristic; Source: The Portfolio and Its Use: A Road Map for 5. rote count to 5; Assessment by Southern Early Childhood Association 6. notice and compare similarities and differences; AUTHORITY NOTE: Promulgated in accordance with R.S.

    17:6.A(10). 7. use words to describe quantity, length, and size. HISTORICAL NOTE: Promulgated by the Board of C. 4-5 Year-Olds: Elementary and Secondary Education, LR 29:2317 (November 2003).

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