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Presenting For Success Video Transcript

By Shawn Cook,2014-06-28 13:42
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Presenting For Success Video Transcript ...

Presenting For Success: Video Transcript

    Careers and Employment,

    La Trobe University

Hobbledehoy Productions

    Director: Caleb McKenny

    Producer: Leigh Hetherton

    Presenter: Stephanie Pradier

Hobbledehoy Team:

    Blake Testro

    Daniel Hall

    Amelia Ducker

    Nicholas Halls

Special thanks to:

    Raj Gill, Robert Paech, Anne Stansfeld, Dana Kabaila, Alyda Van Ingen, Ilya Egorov,

    Jenny McCutcheon, La Trobe University Guild.

    Video 1 - Grooming and Manners Matter

Vintage Presenter: Oh, hello. So, you’re an up and coming young go-getter, looking

    for an opening in today’s ever expanding job market – What do

    you need to know? What skills will help you obtain and maintain

    that perfect job? Well, let me tell… (derail)

Presenter: The job market is constantly changing and now more than ever it’s

    the extra skills such as the social skills that will help you get a job

    and keep it. Here’s how to make sure the impression you make is

    positive and professional. Welcome to Presenting For Success!

     Title Screen

Presenter: Grooming and manners not only play a large part in how you

    present yourself to future employers, but also affects how others

    see you in general. A single social faux pas can have repercussions

    you may well be unaware of. For example, what impression does

    an unironed shirt give to your potential employer or even to your

    colleagues? You could have the greatest resume in the world, but a

    resume is only a glimpse of the real you. Employers don’t hire on

    resumes alone, and winning them over takes a lot more than an ‘A’

    average. So how important is grooming in the workplace?

Raj Gill: It’s very important, grooming in the workplace. I’d have to say that

    in terms of the way you present yourself it’s not just

    communication in terms of verbal communication, it’s also

    through non-verbal communication, as well as your body language

     and a part of all that is initially your first impressions, which will

    be seen in the way you are dressed, and whether that’s in a

    professional manner.

    Anne Stansfeld: I think it’s important to check out what sort of clothes people wear

    in that workplace, and maybe just step it up a level. So, if you’re at

    all concerned about what to wear, I’d suggest wearing conservative

    clothes. I don’t think you need to wear anything that’s actually

    going to make you stand out what will make you stand out is the

    fact that you’ve taken care of your appearance: that you’ve ironed

    your shirt, that you’ve polished your shoes, that your nails are

    clean. And that sort of thing can make a difference.

Raj Gill: Really I think the candidates that unfortunately fall down in that

    particular area around grooming are the ones that are not

    necessarily comfortable in what they are wearing and it comes

    across in their body language.

Robert Paech: You know it’s putting yourself into the other person’s shoes, and

    determining what you want them to see out of you.

Raj Gill: Potential employees could definitely look to ensure that they don’t

    have any unsewn buttons on their coats or jackets. It’s those

    finishing touches that really do make a statement. Ensure that their

    nails are always clean and well manicured men and women. If

    you have, for example, tattoos as well, I would recommend that

    you assess the environment, and if they are visible (i.e. on your

    arms), that they’re covered.

Robert Paech: It’s first impressions last, and when you walk into a room, how you

    are groomed how you dress yourself, how you cut your hair, how

    you shave will make that impression.

Presenter: So let’s see how you can present the best possible you in your

    workplace or interview. Here are some helpful tips:

    ? Observe what clothes your colleagues wear and dress

    accordingly. Torn jeans, shorts and thongs, and clothing

    that is revealing or too tight are rarely acceptable.

    Females should also be conscious of not wearing attire

    that is too revealing.

    ? Keep your hair neat and your shoes polished.

    ? Shower daily and use a deodorant.

    ? Wash and iron (or dry clean) your clothes frequently.

    ? If you smoke, don’t do so immediately before you enter a

    building or a meeting the smell on your breath and on

    your clothes is very unpleasant. The same goes for strong

    foods.

    Presenter: Dressing the part and looking your best are important in delivering

    a good impression. However, your actions also play a vital role in

    the way that you present yourself. Conduct both inside and outside

    the workplace affect how people see you.

    Raj Gill: Manners are very important! It would be very awkward if you

    were in a situation where you are talking to someone, particularly

    at an interview, you have just met them, and you have entered a

    conversation and just walked off you haven’t said thank you or

    shook their hand…

    Anne Stansfeld: It’s just something as simple as saying please and thank you means

    that you are respecting the other person, that you appreciate what

    they do, that you have consideration for them, and I think it

    indicates the way that you would like to be treated as well.

    Robert Paech: Manners are a simple thing of showing respect to other people, and

    through showing respect to other people, they are likely to show

    respect back to you.

    Presenter: Let’s take a look at a typical workplace scenario. Our two recent

    employees, Blake and Dan, have been invited out for a work

    dinner function. Let’s have a look at some of the things you should

    and shouldn’t do:

    ? If an invitation asks you to do so, you must reply. If there is

    no request to RSVP, you should still do so.

    Dan: Just keep checking, I’m definitely on there.

    Reception desk: Sorry just one moment

    Blake: Hi. Blake Testro from marketing…?

    Reception: Here we are, head on through, Sir.

    Blake: Thank you very much

    Dan: Go to ‘D’, it’s ‘Daniel’. He may have just put Dan.

    ? Always put your hand over your mouth when yawning or

    sneezing.

? When you have been served food or drink, look at the

    person who served you and say ‘thank you’. When making

    a request, always say ‘please’. Blake: Hi, can I get a champagne please?

    Barman: Sure

    Blake: Thanks very much

    Dan: Scotch me!

? When using cutlery, start from the outside and work your

    way in. Remember to have correct posture, elbows off the

    table, and place your cutlery down when not in use, with

    the fork facing down.

    ? Don’t wave your cutlery around, even when there is no

    food on it. Rest the knife and fork back on the plate while

    you’re chewing or talking to someone - not together, or

    your plate might be cleared.

    ? Keep your mouth closed while you are eating, and don’t

    speak while you are chewing. Also, don’t put food and

    liquid together in your mouth.

? When you have finished your meal or course, place your

    fork and knife close together pointing at 12 o’clock, and

    with the fork or spoon facing upwards.

    Dan: Dessert! Dessert! Dessert! Dessert! Dessert!

    Dessert! Dessert! Dessert!

? Always contact your host to thank them after attending an

    event you have been invited to. Even if you have done so

    on the night, it is very nice to phone, email, or to send them

    a letter.

    Blake: Thank you very much for tonight, it was a wonderful

    evening.

    Manager: Not a problem, hope to see you again soon.

    Blake: Thank you.

    Dan: OK! Which of you all are coming to the pub? Yeah?

    Blake? Argh!

    Manager: Congratulations!

    Blake: Thank you for the opportunity. I won’t let the team down.

    Presenter: Even though they seem like simple commonplace items to

    remember, it is surprising to see how many employees or potential

    employees do not take these ideas seriously.

     Presenting yourself in a positive and professional manner has the

    potential to impress others, and affect your future career

    opportunities. If you have created a negative impression, you may

    have already burnt a bridge you may not have even known you had.

    Let’s have a look at what we have covered so far.

     (Recap)

     Hopefully these tips have provided you with some things to think

    about in your next interview or workplace function. Be sure to

    check out our other helpful videos in the series.

Vintage Presenter: Presenting for Success helping you make the best impression,

    every time!

    Video 2 Meeting and Greeting

Vintage Presenter: Oh, hello. So, you’re an up and coming young go-getter, looking

    for an opening in today’s ever expanding job market – What do

    you need to know? What skills will help you obtain and maintain

    that perfect job? Well, let me tell… (derail)

    Presenter: The job market is constantly changing and now more than ever it’s

    the extra skills such as the social skills that will help you get a job

    and keep it. Here’s how to make sure the impression you make is

    positive and professional. Welcome to Presenting For Success!

     Title Screen

Presenter: Networking with people is a powerful and often unutilised skill in

    the workplace. Meeting and conversing with people in your field

    or workplace can lead to fantastic opportunities, and can give you

    the edge in either searching for a job, or furthering your career.

    How many times have you heard someone say that they got the job

    because they knew someone? Getting out there and establishing

    valuable connections may not pay off immediately, but when it

    does pay off, it pays off big time! That perfect job may just be a

    conversation away, so it is important to present yourself in the best

    possible light in all networking situations.

Raj Gill: In order to progress in your career and to learn more and develop,

    you need to build up a network, and it is something you can really

    do here at university and throughout your career and as you

    continue to develop…

Robert Paech: People seem to think that ‘networking’ is a fairly mysterious thing,

    and all it is, is about building relationships, and through those

    relationships, being able to take advantage or identify potential

    opportunities.

Anne Stansfeld: I think the first thing that people often don’t realise is that

    networking isn’t all about you. It’s actually meant to be a

    reciprocal relationship because there may be some stage down the

    track where you can help somebody else. I don’t think that you

    should ever go into a networking opportunity thinking about ‘what

    can I get out of it?’ – you may get something out of it, it may not

    be immediate, it may be long term but it is also just about

    building relationships.

Raj Gill: First impressions last. It’s very important that those first couple of

    minutes, even first couple of seconds, which involves the way that

    you look, the way that you present yourself, the way that you even

    shake someone’s hand or say hello, are very very important, and

    you only get one chance to provide that first impression.

Anne Stansfeld: The thing is, is that ‘what goes around, comes around.’ So, good

    behaviour comes back to reward you - bad behaviour comes back

    to bite you.

Robert Paech: One of the most important things is to remember people’s names.

    Often, the most difficult thing is that you go and meet someone

    and 5 seconds later you cannot remember their name, and to

    approach that person in the future, if you don’t know their name, it

    becomes infinitely harder to actually make contact with them again.

Raj Gill: But always have something there prepared, yet not scripted, that

    you can fall back on in case the conversation doesn’t continue or it

    comes to a point where it goes quiet.

Presenter: So what do we need to know about networking? People make a

    judgment call about you in the first 10 seconds that they meet you.

    So how do we make those first 10 seconds count? Here are some

    tips to keep in mind…

    ? When meeting someone formally, always shake hands

    firmly, but not too firmly and not for too long. Look the

    other person in the eye and smile. Don’t go so close to the

    other person that they feel uncomfortable.

    ? Turn off your mobile phone in a meeting, restaurant or

    cinema. If you have forgotten to do this and it rings, turn it

    off immediately without answering the call.

    ? When meeting someone for the first time, perhaps follow

    up the introduction with a question.

    Blake: So, I understand you went to La Trobe?

    ? Use the person’s name immediately after the introduction

    so you remember it, and because it’s polite.

    Amelia: Yes, I did my accounting degree there. How about

    you Blake? Where did you study?

    ? After being introduced to someone, greet him or her

    according to how you have been introduced to them. If you

    are not sure, it is safer to be more formal.

    Blake: Oh, Mrs Birkenstock! Amelia, this is Mrs

    Birkenstock; she is our head of marketing.

    Amelia: Pleasure to meet you Mrs Birkenstock.

    Mrs Birkenstock: Lovely to meet you Amelia. How are you

    settling in?

    Presenter: You’d be surprised at how far simple things like these can go.

    Workplace functions provide a variety of opportunities to further

    you career they may even hold the key to you getting that next

    promotion. So what do you need to know about networking and

    social events? Let’s check in with our two new employees, Blake

    and Dan.

? At a work-related social function, don’t stick just to the

    people you know - be prepared to meet new people.

    Dan: So who are all these people?

    Blake: They’re from head office, Dan.

    Dan: Right…

    Blake: Hi, I’m Blake, from marketing

    Manager: Nice to meet you, Blake.

? If the person you are being introduced to is different from

    you culturally, by age or by status, follow their lead on

    physical contact and space:

    Dan: (putting arm around Manager), Hey, how’s it going?

    How you doing? I’m Dan! How’s Blake been treating you?

? If you have brought you partner or spouse to a work

    function, make sure you introduce them to your colleagues,

    and brief your partner beforehand.

    Blake: Dan, this is my partner, Jenny.

    Dan: Hi

    Jenny: Hi, nice to meet you.

    Blake: So where is Mary tonight?

    Dan: Somewhere… oh well.

    ? Don’t drink too much alcohol at a work related event.

    Dan: Cheers

    ? At catered events, don’t eat and drink as though you

    haven’t eaten for a week.

    Dan: What? I’m Hungry!

Manager: Congratulations!

    Blake: Thank you for the opportunity. I won’t let the team down.

Presenter: Even though they seem like simple commonplace items to

    remember, it is surprising to see how many employees or potential

    employees do not take these ideas seriously.

    Meeting and greeting the right people in the right way has the

    potential to open up a wealth of opportunities, and making the

    most of work related events shows that you’re willing to take that

    extra step in your career something that management will keep in

    mind when considering the next promotion. If you have created a

    negative impression you have already burnt a bridge you may not

    have even known you had. So, let’s have a look at what we have

    covered so far.

    (Recap)

     Hopefully these tips have provided you with some things to think

    about in your next interview or workplace function. Be sure to

    check out our other helpful videos in the series.

    Vintage Presenter: Presenting for Success helping you make the best impression,

    every time!

    Video 3 Written Business Communication

    Vintage Presenter: Oh, hello. So, you’re an up and coming young go-getter, looking

    for an opening in today’s ever expanding job market – What do

    you need to know? What skills will help you obtain and maintain

    that perfect job? Well, let me tell… (derail)

    Presenter: The job market is constantly changing and now more than ever it’s

    the extra skills such as the social skills that will help you get a job

    and keep it. Here’s how to make sure the impression you make is

    positive and professional. Welcome to Presenting For Success!

     Title Screen

Presenter: Communicating effectively with colleagues and clients is an

    important skill to have, not only in the work place, but also when

    you are applying for jobs. However, communication does not just

    mean good manners and spoken English. A vast amount of the

    communication you will do in the workplace will take place via

    email, regular mail, or written forms. Communicating effectively

    also means writing effectively. Reading someone’s tone in an

    email is a lot harder to do than when they are speaking to you.

    How many times have you read an email and inferred the wrong

    meaning just because you did not know what tone it was written in.

    Making the right choice in written communication may save you a

    lot of time and worry, and may also save you from potential

    embarrassment.

Raj Gill: Written communication is very very important; it reflects on you.

    In terms of communicating, whether it’s internally, externally with

    clients, emails are used extensively.

Robert Paech: I read a lot of documents, I read a lot of reports, and the biggest

    failing I see is that people don’t think about their readers. When

    you write a document, before you even put pen to paper, finger to

    keyboard, you need to put yourself into the reader’s shoes – you

    need to think about what the reader already understands about the

    topic you are writing about, and also what the reader wants to

    know, or needs to know about the subject you are writing on.

Raj Gill: It depends on what form of communication you are using. So, if

    it’s an email, keep it succinct; it’s got to be concise. Be mindful of

    who you are sending it to. If you have built up a rapport with the

    person who you are about to email, you might want to ask them

    how they were, you may know something about them what they

    did on the weekend or a couple of weeks ago. At the same time, if

    you are sending an email to someone more senior, be mindful of

    that.

    Anne Stansfeld: People think that it’s an email, it’s quick communication it’s not

    formal communication, but in the business setting, it is a formal

    communication. It doesn’t have to be archaic, but it needs to be

    correct, it needs to be proof read, capitals need to be used, and

    spelling and grammar need to be correct too. It actually irritates me

    when people send emails that don’t show they have taken a bit of

    care with them.

    Robert Paech: The common mistakes I see with emails, the main one I see, is

    people not proof reading their emails. Often email is seen as a very

    quick way of communicating to other people, and like any form of

    communication it’s about getting the message across, and if people misinterpret it and don’t understand it, it is wasting their time.

    Presenter: So what do we need to know about effective written

    communication? How do you present a professional image without

    actually being there in person? Here are some tips to keep in mind.

    ? If asked to prepare a written report, large or small, ask if

    there are any templates or standard ways to present the

    information.

    ? Don’t overuse email; sometimes a phone is much better and

    faster.

    ? Proof read any business communication before you send it.

    ? Keep up-to-date with your emails or phone messages.

    Attend to them promptly, even if it’s just to say that you

    have received the communication and you will get back to

    them ASAP.

    ? The intention can be misinterpreted in an email or business

    letter, as words do not always convey the feeling of the

    writer. Be careful of your tone for example, when using

    capital letters or exclamation marks.

    Presenter: Email and the internet are very important tools for business

    communication. You’d be hard pressed to find a company that

    doesn’t utilise email as its primary mode of communication both

    internally and externally. Email etiquette is very important,

    especially when emailing on behalf of your employer. So what are

    some examples of email etiquette? Let’s check in with our two

    new employees, Blake and Dan.

    ? With email, do not over use the ‘high priority’ option or

    ‘reply to all’ buttons.

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