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MISSISSIPPI

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MISSISSIPPI ...

     May 21, 2004

    MISSISSIPPI

    CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK

    FOR

    BARBER/STYLIST

    (Program CIP: 12.0402 Barber/Hairstylist)

POSTSECONDARY 2004

     May 21, 2004

    Direct inquiries to:

    Program Coordinator

    Trade, Industrial, and Related Technology

    Office of Vocational and Technical Education

    Mississippi Department of Education

    P. O. Box 771

    Jackson, MS 39205

    (601) 359-3940

    For copies of this publication, contact:

    Research and Curriculum Unit

    Mississippi State University

    P. O. Drawer DX

    Mississippi State, MS 39762

    (662) 325-2510

    Published by:

    Office of Vocational and Technical Research and Curriculum Unit

     Education for Workforce Development

    Mississippi Department of Education Vocational and Technical Education

    Jackson, Mississippi Mississippi State University

     Mississippi State, Mississippi

    2004

The Mississippi Department of Education, Office of Vocational Education and Workforce

    Development does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin,

    sex, age, or disability in the provision of educational programs and services or

    employment opportunities and benefits. The following office has been designated to

    handle inquiries and complaints regarding the non-discrimination policies of the

    Mississippi Department of Education: Director, Office of Human Resources, Mississippi

    Department of Education, 359 North West Street, Suite 359, Jackson, Mississippi

    39201, (601) 359-3511.

     May 21, 2004

    FOREWORD

As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new

    practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and

    participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way

    people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and

    communicate effectively; think creatively, solve problems, and make decisions; and

    interact with each other and the technologies in the workplace. Vocational-technical

    programs must also adopt these practices in order to provide graduates who can enter

    and advance in the changing work world.

The curriculum framework in this document reflects these changes in the workplace and

    a number of other factors that impact on local vocational-technical programs. Federal

    and state legislation calls for articulation between high school and community college

    programs, integration of academic and vocational skills, and the development of

    sequential courses of study that provide students with the optimum educational path for

    achieving successful employment. National skills standards, developed by industry

    groups and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and Labor, provide

    vocational educators with the expectations of employers across the United States. All

    of these factors are reflected in the framework found in this document.

Each postsecondary program of instruction consists of a program description and a

    suggested sequence of courses which focus on the development of occupational

    competencies. Each vocational-technical course in this sequence has been written

    using a common format which includes the following components:

    ? Course Name A common name that will be used by all community/junior

    colleges in reporting students.

    ? Course Abbreviation A common abbreviation that will be used by all

    community/junior colleges in reporting students.

    ? Classification Courses may be classified as:

    ? Vocational-technical core A required vocational-technical course for all

    students.

    ? Vocational-technical elective An elective vocational-technical course.

    ? Related academic course An academic course which provides academic

    skills and knowledge directly related to the program area.

    ? Academic core An academic course which is required as part of the

    requirements for an Associate degree.

    ? Description A short narrative which includes the major purpose(s) of the course

    and the recommended number of hours of lecture and laboratory activities to be

    conducted each week during a regular semester.

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    ? Prerequisites A listing of any courses that must be taken prior to or on

    enrollment in the course.

    ? Corequisites A listing of courses that may be taken while enrolled in the course.

    ? Competencies and Suggested Objectives A listing of the competencies (major

    concepts and performances) and of the suggested student objectives that will

    enable students to demonstrate mastery of these competencies.

    The following guidelines were used in developing the program(s) in this document and

    should be considered in compiling and revising course syllabi and daily lesson plans at

    the local level:

    ? The content of the courses in this document reflects approximately 75 percent of

    the time allocated to each course. The remaining 25 percent of each course

    should be developed at the local district level and may reflect:

    ? Additional competencies and objectives within the course related to topics

    not found in the State framework, including activities related to specific

    needs of industries in the community college district.

    ? Activities which develop a higher level of mastery on the existing

    competencies and suggested objectives.

    ? Activities and instruction related to new technologies and concepts that

    were not prevalent at the time the current framework was

    developed/revised.

    ? Activities which implement components of the Mississippi Tech Prep

    initiative, including integration of academic and vocational-technical skills

    and coursework, school-to-work transition activities, and articulation of

    secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical programs.

    ? Individualized learning activities, including worksite learning activities, to

    better prepare individuals in the courses for their chosen occupational

    area.

    ? Sequencing of the course within a program is left to the discretion of the local

    district. Naturally, foundation courses related to topics such as safety, tool and

    equipment usage, and other fundamental skills should be taught first. Other

    courses related to specific skill areas and related academics, however, may be

    sequenced to take advantage of seasonal and climatic conditions, resources

    located outside of the school, and other factors.

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    ? Programs that offer an Associate of Applied Science degree must include a

    minimum 15 semester credit hour academic core. Specific courses to be taken

    within this core are to be determined by the local district. Minimum academic

    core courses are as follows:

    ? 3 semester credit hours Math/Science Elective

    ? 3 semester credit hours Written Communications Elective

    ? 3 semester credit hours Oral Communications Elective

    ? 3 semester credit hours Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

    ? 3 semester credit hours Social/Behavioral Science Elective

It is recommended that courses in the academic core be spaced out over the entire

    length of the program, so that students complete some academic and vocational-

    technical courses each semester. Each community/junior college has the discretion to

    select the actual courses that are required to meet this academic core requirement.

    ? In instances where secondary programs are directly related to community and

    junior college programs, competencies and suggested objectives from the high

    school programs are listed as Baseline Competencies. These competencies and

    objectives reflect skills and knowledge that are directly related to the community

    and junior college vocational-technical program. In adopting the curriculum

    framework, each community and junior college is asked to give assurances that:

    ? students who can demonstrate mastery of the Baseline Competencies do

    not receive duplicate instruction, and

    ? students who cannot demonstrate mastery of this content will be given the

    opportunity to do so. ? The roles of the Baseline Competencies are to:

    ? Assist community/junior college personnel in developing articulation

    agreements with high schools, and

    ? Ensure that all community and junior college courses provide a higher

    level of instruction than their secondary counterparts.

    ? The Baseline Competencies may be taught as special “Introduction” courses for

    3-6 semester hours of institutional credit which will not count toward Associate

    degree requirements. Community and junior colleges may choose to integrate

    the Baseline Competencies into ongoing courses in lieu of offering the

    “Introduction” courses or may offer the competencies through special projects or

    individualized instruction methods.

    ? Technical elective courses have been included to allow community colleges and

    students to customize programs to meet the needs of industries and employers

    in their area.

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May 21, 2004

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     May 21, 2004

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    Writing Team

    Jacqueline Sullivan, Hinds Community College, MS Board of Barber Examiners

    Murray Neal, Hinds Community College

    Team Leader

    Jolanda Harris, Curriculum Specialist, RCU

    MDE Staff

     Sam Davis, Program Coordinator, MDE

    Research Person

    Jacqueline Sullivan, Hinds Community College, MS Board of Barber Examiners

    Professional Curriculum Advisory Team

    James Cessna, Vicksburg, MS

    Penny Edwards, Academy of Hair, Moss Point, MS

    Mac Ables, Florence, MS

    Perry Gibson, West Point, MS

    Ricky Jones, J & J Hair Design College, Senatobia, MS

    Mary Coleman, Trendsetters Barber College, Jackson, MS

    Clinton Brock, Carthage, MS

    Lyvette Banks, Natchez, MS

    Richard Brown, Hair World, Laurel, MS

    Tanya Jones, Vicksburg, MS

    Cindy Welch-Smith, Family Barber Shop, Madison, MS

    James Cook, Cooks Barber Shop, Hattiesburg, MS

    Darlene Payment, Transitions, Clinton, MS

    Crystal Brown, Southern Salon, Clinton, MS

    Antonio Johnson, Ron’s Hair Gallery, Jackson, MS

    Leslie Howard, Cutting Edge, Clinton, MS

    Ervin Harris, Jackson, MS

**ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for Students reprinted with

    permission from National Educational Technology Standards for Students: Connecting

    Curriculum and Technology, copyright ? 2000, ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education), 1.800.336.5191 (U.S. & Canada) or 1.541.302.3777

    (International), iste@iste.org, www.iste.org. All rights reserved. Permission does not

    constitute an endorsement by ISTE.

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May 21, 2004

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     May 21, 2004

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

     Page

    FOREWORD ................................................................................................................... 3

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .................................................................................................. 7

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION FOR BARBERING/STYLIST ............................................ 11

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR BARBERING/STYLIST ............................ 12

SECTION I: CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR BARBERING/STYLIST ............................... 13

     Barbering/Stylist Courses ................................................................................... 15

     Basic Practices in Barbering .................................................................... 17

     Fundamental Practices in Barbering I ...................................................... 19

     Fundamental Practices in Barbering II ..................................................... 22

     Intermediate Practices in Barbering I ....................................................... 25

     Intermediate Practices in Barbering II ...................................................... 28

     Advanced Practices in Barbering ............................................................. 30

SECTION II: RECOMMENDED TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT ........................................ 33

APPENDIX A: RELATED ACADEMIC TOPICS ........................................................... 39

    APPENDIX B: WORKPLACE SKILLS .......................................................................... 49

APPENDIX C: NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS FOR

    STUDENTS ................................................................................................................. 53

APPENDIX D: STUDENT COMPETENCY PROFILE .................................................. 57

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May 21, 2004

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