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General Information

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General Information ...

     2 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY stARMY ROTC 1 ARCTIC BATTALION

    MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSTIY

    1400 TOWNSEND DRIVE

    HOUGHTON, MI 49931

     REPLY TO ATTENTION OF

    ATOW-IMI-MT 14 December 2006

     stMEMORANDUM FOR 1 ARCTIC BATTALION CADETS

    STSUBJECT: 1 Arctic Battalion Army ROTC Handbook

    st1. Welcome to the 1 Arctic ROTC Battalion headquartered at MTU.

    2. The ROTC program prepares students to become commissioned officers in the

    United States Army active component, the Army Reserve or Army National Guard. The

    key goals of the program are:

    ? to develop leadership skills

    ? to develop character and inculcate the Army values

    ? to ingrain in Cadets what an officer should be, know and do

    ? to encourage academic excellence in the belief that lifelong learning is a key attribute of a

    leader

    3. Any student who shows sincere commitment to reach these goals will be successful in the

    program and will be commissioned an officer in the United States Army.

    4. This handbook is a reference for all cadets in the entire ROTC Battalion. While the handbook

    does not answer all questions, it does address the fundamental aspects of being a successful Army

    ROTC Cadet. It is in no way a substitution for the numerous Cadet Command regulations, Army

    regulations and Field Manuals the information contained in this handbook was pulled from. We

    will continue to update the handbook periodically to keep the information current. Any comments

    or suggestions regarding the Cadet Handbook should be directed to the battalion’s Senior Military

    Instructor or the Professor of Military Science.

    5. The POC for this memorandum is the undersigned @ 906-487-3436 or dleubank@edu.mtu.

     DALLAS L. EUBANKS

     LTC, FA

     Professor of Military Science

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    PART I- What Every Cadet Should Know

    General information……………………………………………..5

    Creed, Codes and Values………………………………………..5

    History…………………………………………………………..7

    Curriculum……………………………………………………..11

    Cadet Leadership Positions…………………………………….12

    Army Physical Fitness Test……………………………………15

    Commissioning Requirements…………………………………17

    Scholarships……………………………………………………17

    Military Courtesy……………………………………………….20

    Wear and Appearance of the Uniforms…………………………21

    Awards………………………………………………………….31

    Rank and Insignia………………………………………………37

    Clubs and Activities……………………………………………42

    Cadet Professional Development Training…………………….43

    Communication………………………………………………..45

    Hand and Arm Signals…………………………………………46

    Movement……………………………………………………..52

    Duties and Responsibilities…………………………………....55

    PART II- Leadership; MSIII-MSIV

    Troop Leading Procedures…………………………………….59

    Estimating the Situation………………………………………..60

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    Combat Orders…………………………………………….62

    Reports…………………………………………………….64

    Patrols……………………………………………………..66

    Assembly Areas, Link-ups and Patrol Bases……………...67

    Indirect Fire Planning……………………………………..69

    9 Line MEDEVAC Request……………………………….71

    Date Time Group…………………………………………..72

    Army Branches…………………………………………….72

    Evaluation and Assessment Cards…………………………81

    Accessions………………………………………………….85

    Training Safety……………………………………………..89

    Planning and Leading PT…………………………………..90

    APPENDIX

    I. Army Acronyms………………………………………..93

    II. APFT Score Charts……………………………………..97

    III. Setup of the LCE……………………………………….100

    IV. Writing Assessment Cards……………………………..100

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    PART I

    WHAT EVERY CADET SHOULD KNOW

General Information

    1. High personal and professional standards of conduct are expected of cadets at all

    times. This handbook provides the basic information you need to assist you in

    developing those standards.

     st2. The 1 Arctic Battalion is made up of Active Army, Active National Guard Cadre, stCivilian Staff, students, and cadets enrolled in military science courses. The 1

    Arctic Battalion functions as both an active duty military organization and as an

    academic department of MTU. Students and cadets enrolled in Military Science stmake up the 1 Arctic Battalion. Students become Cadets when they contract

    with the ROTC program.

     st3. The mission of the 1 Arctic Battalion is to commission the future officer

    leadership of the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, and the National Guard.

     st4. The Cadre and Staff of the 1 Arctic Battalion are always available to assist you.

    Office hours are Monday through Friday from 0900 hours to 1700 hours. If you

    need assistance or have questions, contact your instructor or see the ROTC

    Administration Secretary.

    5. All contracted Cadets are assigned a mailbox located in the basement hallway of

    the ROTC building in front of the cadet classroom. Mailboxes should be checked

    before Lab on Thursday.

    6. The Cadet lounge and computer labs are located in the basement of the ROTC

    building and are available for any Cadet to use. Inquire with upperclassmen for

    the lock combination. It is important that when using the Cadet lounge you don’t

    leave it unsecured.

CREEDS/CODES TO LIVE BY

    1. Standard of Conduct:

    We will hold all cadets to the standard of a professional Army officer. This will

    be exemplified on campus, in public, in ROTC events and anywhere the public

    can see or hear about your actions.

    2. Cadet Creed

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    I am an Army Cadet. Soon I will take an oath and become an Army Officer

    committed to defending the values, which make this nation great. Honor is my

    touchstone. I understand Mission first and People always.

    I am the past, the spirit of those Warriors who made the final sacrifice.

    I am the Present, the scholar and apprentice soldier enhancing my skills in the

    science of warfare and the art of leadership.

    But above all, I am the future, the future Warrior Leader of the United States

    Army. May God give me the compassion and judgment to lead and the gallantry

    in battle to WIN.

    I WILL DO MY DUTY.

Warrior Ethos

    Found in the Soldiers’ Creed, the Warrior Ethos is the fighting spirit of the Soldier.

    Being a Soldier or Cadet requires us to live this ethos.

    3. Soldiers Creed

I am an American Soldier.

    I am a Warrior and a member of a team. I serve the people of the United States and live

    the Army Values.

    I will always place the mission first.

    I will never accept defeat. I will never quit.

    I will never leave a fallen comrade.

    I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior

    tasks and drills. I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.

    I am an expert and I am a professional.

    I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy the enemies of the United States of America

    in close combat.

    I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.

    I am an American Soldier.

    4. Army Values:

    Loyalty- Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. constitution, the Army, and

    other soldiers. Be loyal to the nation and its heritage.

    Duty- Fulfill your obligations. Accept responsibility for your own actions and

    those entrusted to your care. Find opportunities to improve oneself for the good

    of the group.

    Respect- Treat others as you would wish to be treated. How we consider others

    reflects upon each of us, both personally and as a professional organization.

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    Selfless Service- Put the welfare of the nation, the Army, and your subordinates

    before your own. Selfless service leads to organizational teamwork and

    encompasses discipline, self-control and faith in the system.

    Honor- Live up to all the Army values.

    Integrity- Do what is right, legally and morally. Be willing to do what is right

    even when no one is looking. It is our "moral compass" an inner voice.

    Personal Courage- Our ability to face fear, danger or adversity; both physical and

    moral courage.

    5. General Orders

    a. I will guard everything within the limits of my post and quit my post only

    when properly relieved.

    b. I will obey my special orders and perform all my duties in a military manner.

    c. I will report violations of my special orders, emergencies, and anything not

    covered in my instructions to the commander of the relief.

    6. ROTC Cannonade

    An integral part of Cadet Command’s reviews and ceremonies, including National

    Advanced Leadership Camp, is the firing of a three-volley cannonade saluting the

    pillars of service to our Nation - Duty, Honor, and Country.

    a. DUTY - Obedience and disciplined performance. Despite difficulty or danger,

    duty requires self-responsibility and selfless devotion.

    b. HONOR - Encompassing integrity and dedication. Honor is the thread which

    holds together the fabric of our Army.

    c. COUNTRY - For which men and women have given their lives. Our country

    shines as the light of freedom and dignity to the world.

ROTC HISTORY

ARMY ROTC - PAST TO PRESENT

The tradition of military instruction on civilian college campuses began in 1818 when

    Captain Alden Partridge, former superintendent at West Point, established the American

    Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy, which later became Norwich University. The

    idea of military instruction in civilian colleges soon spread to other institutions, including

    Virginia Military Institute, The University of Tennessee, and The Citadel. The Land

    Grant Act of 1862 (Morrill Act) reinforced this tradition by specifying that courses in

    military tactics should be offered at the colleges and universities established.

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    Although 105 colleges and universities offered this instruction by the turn of the century, the college military instruction program was not directly associated with Army needs. The National Defense Act of 1916 turned away from the idea of an expandable Regular Army and firmly established the traditional American concept of a citizen’s Army as the keystone of our defense forces. It merged the National Guard, the Army Reserve, and the Regular Army into the Army of the United States. Officers for this expanded citizen’s

    Army were to be given military instruction in colleges and universities under a Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. Army ROTC was firmly established in the form in which it is known today.

    By the beginning of World War I, ROTC had placed some 90,000 officers in the reserve pool. In 1917 and 1918, the majority of these were called to active duty.

    At the outbreak of World War II, more than 56,000 Army ROTC officers were called to active duty within a six-month period. By the end of World War II, more than 100,000 had served. Since 1945, more than 328,000 men and women have received commissions through Army ROTC.

    In 1945, Congress passed the ROTC vitalization Act, which made the ROTC program more effective by establishing an attractive scholarship program, introducing the two-year program and providing monthly financial assistance to Advanced Course Students.

    Today, the importance of the ROTC program to national security is highlighted by the fact that about 75% of all officers commissioned each year come from ROTC sources. The national resurgence of interest in ROTC is also clearly evident by the involvement of over 70,000 college students in ROTC courses and by the more than 270 college institutions and 600 cross-enrolled schools that offer the ROTC program on their campuses.

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

    SSI Description

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    A shield arched at top and bottom, 3 1/2 inches in height and 2 1/2 inches in width, consisting of a field divided quarterly yellow and black and thereon at upper right a yellow lamp of knowledge inflamed, at lower left a yellow Trojan helmet, and diagonally across the yellow quarter a black sword point up, all between two yellow panels outlined black and inscribed in black letters 5/16 inch in height, "LEADERSHIP" at top and "EXCELLENCE" below, all within a 1/8 inch black border.

    Symbolism

    The shield symbolizes the Army mission of national defense and is divided into quarters representing the four traditional military science courses comprising the Senior ROTC curriculum. The sword signifies courage, gallantry and self-sacrifice intrinsic to the profession of arms. The lamp denotes the pursuit of knowledge, higher learning, and the partnership of Army ROTC with American colleges and universities. The Trojan helmet is symbolic of the ancient civilization concept of the warrior scholar. The motto Leadership Excellence expresses the ultimate responsibility of Army ROTC in the

    discharge of its moral responsibility to the nation.

History of Military Science at MTU

    The history of the Michigan Tech is closely interwoven with that of the United States Army Corps of Engineers. In 1917, over 300 men of the 1st Battalion, 107th Engineers, were mobilized on the campus. Every officer of this battalion was a graduate of Michigan Tech. In addition, many students of the college and faculty members joined Company "G", 125th Infantry, 32nd Division.

    In the summer of 1928, the War Department authorized the formation of an Engineer Unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps at the Michigan College of Mining and Technology. Establishment of this unit was accomplished largely through the effort of Professor Julius T. Natchazel, a past member of the academic faculty and a former Army officer. On 26 October 1928, the first Federal Inspection was conducted on the campus, and by November, the unit included approximately 100 cadets and the required courses were under way. Although the program was voluntary, this initial enrollment included the entire freshman class. As a result of the first year's work and the annual inspection, the members of the unit were authorized to wear a blue star on the sleeve of their uniforms, denoting the designation of the unit as an honor unit.

    In 1930, it was decided that more color was desired in the uniform, and a committee of cadet officers, working with the military staff, designed a shoulder patch to be worn on the uniforms of ROTC cadets. The patch, shield-shaped showing the name of MCM&T; has a golden background for the upper portion, with a "husky" dog's head superimposed. The stamina and sturdiness of the husky and his prowess in the North Country is traditional, and Michigan Technological University, a far-north college within the United States, has taken the silver husky as its symbol. Its athletic teams are known as "Huskies". The lower part of the patch is scarlet on the left and white on the right - the colors of the Corps of Engineers. Thus, the patch not only contains the college colors of silver and gold, but indicates the fact that this is a unit of the Corps of Engineers. The effectiveness of this engineer ROTC unit has been proven by the records of its former members, and great credit is due to its original organizers who foresaw its eventual value. The Tech ROTC was maintained by the capable and enthusiastic Army

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    officers who functioned as Professor of Military Science and Tactics. During the decade of the 1930's the college enrollment of male students gradually increased to 900, while the strength of the ROTC unit reached approximately 400 just prior to the outbreak of World War II. In 1934, the uniform was changed to the dark whipcord cap and blouse and light shade elastic trousers (commonly known as "pinks and greens"). The Sam Browne belts and sabers were retained. Two years later, a new indoor range was constructed by the college to replace the range in the storage attic of the gymnasium (later known as the "Clubhouse" and presently as the "ROTC Building"). Supply facilities were also established in the building which housed the new range. Civilian Pilot Training (later Civilian Aeronautics Authority, (CAA)), was included under the ROTC program in 1939. By the end of World War II, approximately 300 students had completed work under these programs.

    In 1943, the advanced course ROTC was discontinued throughout the country, and the basic course greatly reduced in strength. However, the introduction of the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) in August of that year brought the Military Department and the staff of the department to its all-time peak strength of 10 officers and 13 enlisted men. It resulted in the training of some 2,650 students prior to its termination in 1946. The major curriculum changes during the period 1943 to 1946 were the dropping of the ROTC program and its replacement by the 98th College Training Detachment, the Army Specialized Training Reserve Program (ASTRP). All in all, there were 1,248 trainees in various Army programs and 1,402 trained by the Army Air Corps. During this period, the students enrolled in the college under this program constituted as much as 80 percent of the total regularly enrolled male students. In 1946, the Army Engineer ROTC program was reestablished and an Air Corps ROTC program initiated. All basic course students were in a common class, instructed by both Engineer and Air Corps personnel. Students of the advanced courses received the prescribed technical instruction from personnel of the respective services. The experiences of the Armed Forces during World War II were incorporated into the doctrine being taught. After an enrollment of only six students in 1946, the combined Air and Engineer ROTC enrollment approximated 300 by the fall of 1948. In February 1947, Michigan Tech Squadron No. 1, a branch ROTC unit (basic course only) was begun with 34 students at the College's Sault Ste. Marie Branch (today, Lake Superior State University) enrolled as cadets. In the fall of 1947, the ROTC Department moved into its present quarters on the main campus in the building previously known as the "gymnasium" and more recently as the "Clubhouse". In 1949, the United States Air Force attained separate autonomy under the Department of the Defense, and the Air Force ROTC was set up as a separate entity in the college. The ranking Air Force officer on the ROTC staff was designated by the President of the college, Dr. Grover C. Dillman, as the Professor of Air Science and Tactics. From that time on, the Air Force (AFROTC) has been a separate department of the college and has become distinct as to course content, uniform and administration. Entering freshman have free choice between the two programs, both of which are voluntary. The facilities placed at the disposal of the ROTC have been steadily improved since the initiation of the program. Classrooms have been modernized, numerous training aids have been provided including projection equipment and models, and office and storage space has been expanded as needs have arisen. A drill team, known as "MacArthur's Engineers", was established in 1950. A Military Ball is held annually in the spring; the Army ROTC

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