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Ian and Joanne,

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Ian and Joanne,

    Canadian Constitutional and Administrative Law

    PPAL 6100 3.0 Winter 2007 th7 10 p.m., 1 Dundas West, 26 Floor

Instructors Professor Ian Greene and Professor Richard Haigh

    Offices & Hours Greene: Room 224 McLaughlin College

    Office Hours: Tuesdays, 9:30 am to 11:30 am (Keele Campus),

    6:00 pm to 7:00 pm on teaching days, (1 Dundas St. West), or by

    appointment. Call 416-736-5128, and speak to receptionist,

     to make appointment.

     Haigh: Room 237 Osgoode Hall Law School

     Office Hours: Mondays from 1:00-2:00 p.m. (starting January 21,

     2008) and Tuesdays from 1:00-2:00 p.m. (starting January 8,

     2008), 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm on teaching days at 1 Dundas West, or

     at other times by appointment. To book an appointment, please

     contact Prof. Haigh by phone or email.

    Contact: Greene: 416-736-2100, ext. 77083 (best contact method)

     igreene@yorku.ca (phone to mention that email sent).

     Fax: 416-736-5436.

     Haigh: 416-650-8257, or rhaigh@osgoode.yorku.ca.

     Fax: 416-736-5736.

     thCourse Location Room E, 26 Floor, 1 Dundas West, Toronto

Course Description

    This course examines the Canadian court system, judicial interpretation of the division of

    powers between federal and provincial governments, and judicial review under the Charter of Rights and other human rights instruments. The implications of the rule of law for public officials are explored, as well as judicial review of administrative decisions.

    NOTE: The classes for this course will be videotaped and videostreamed onto the secure class web page for students’ future reference. Students must attend at least 9 of the 12 classes in person.

Course Organization & Mark Breakdown

    Analysis of federalism assignment (due Tuesday, January 29, 2008) 20% Case Analysis (due Tuesday, February 26, 2008) 20%

    Essay (due Tuesday, April 1, 2008) 35%

    Seminar Presentation 5%

    Seminar Participation 20%

    *Note that final course grades may be adjusted to conform to Program or Faculty grades distribution profiles.

Required Texts

Canadian Constitutional and Administrative Law 2 of 6

    Students are required to purchase two texts. The Greene text is a general overview of the legal system and should be read prior to the commencement of the class. The Baier text is to be read for the analysis of federalism assignment.

    Baier, Gerald. Courts and Federalism, Judicial Doctrine in the United States Australia

    and Canada (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2006).

    Greene, Ian. The Courts. (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2006).

Course Website

    Links to required readings on-line are available on the course website at

     http://www.yorku.ca/igreene

     1 of 5

Analysis of Federalism Assignment

    Students must read Gerald Baier, Courts and Federalism, Judicial Doctrine in the United

    States Australia and Canada (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2006). Based on the Baier analysis and materials presented in class, write a short (8 to 10 doubled spaced typed pages) analysis of the impact of judicial decisions on the current state of Canadian federalism.

    The assignment is due on Tuesday, January 29. A hard copy of the paper must be

    submitted to the instructor during the class. If you cannot attend the class, you may submit the paper to the reception desk, 220 McLaughlin College (Attn: Profs. Greene & thHaigh), or to the reception desk, Osgoode Professional Development Program, 26 Floor,

    1 Dundas West (Attn: Profs. Haigh & Greene). Late papers may be sent by email to the Graduate Program Assistant for the MPPAL: mppal@yorku.ca. Late papers are penalized at 3% per day.

Case Analysis

    Students must analyze and compare the legal reasoning in two cases:

    a) Singh v. Minister of Employment and Immigration, [1985] 1 S.C.R. 177, and b) Charkaoui v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration), [2007] 1 S.C.R. 350, 2007 SCC 9. Both of these cases can be found on the Supreme Court of Canada website (links on the class website).

    Are the legal outcomes in these cases consistent? What are the similarities and differences in the way members of the Supreme Court of Canada (including both the main decision and the separate concurring decision in Singh) approach the issues?

The case analysis assignment is due on Tuesday, February 26, 2008. A hard copy of

    the paper must be submitted to the instructor during the class. If you cannot attend the class, you may submit the paper to the reception desk, 220 McLaughlin College (Attn: Profs. Greene & Haigh), or to the reception desk, Osgoode Professional Development

Canadian Constitutional and Administrative Law 3 of 6

     thProgram, 26 Floor, 1 Dundas West (Attn: Profs. Haigh & Greene). Late papers may be sent by email to the Graduate Program Assistant for the MPPAL: mppal@yorku.ca. Late papers are penalized at 3% per day.

Major Essay

    Students are required to write a major essay on a public law issue. All paper topics must be approved by the instructor by February 5. Essays must have a clear thesis and a series of arguments to support it. The paper must be approximately 12 to 15 pages double-spaced. It will require you to undertake both primary and secondary research. The assignment is due on Tuesday, April 1, 2008. A hard copy of the paper must be

    submitted to the instructor. If you cannot attend the class, you may submit the paper to the School of Public Policy and Administration on the 8th floor North of the Ross Building (North 802 Ross, Attn: Prof. Greene), or to the reception desk, Osgoode thProfessional Development Program, 26 Floor, 1 Dundas West (Attn: Prof. Haigh).

    Email or fax versions of assignments will not be accepted. Late papers are penalized at 3% per day.

Seminar Participation

    Seminars are an integral component of this course and seminar attendance is mandatory. Students are required to read the assigned material each week and participate in its analysis during the class discussion. On occasion, there will be pop quizzes based on the required reading for that day. The seminar mark is based on attendance, regular participation and the quizzes.

Seminar Presentations

    Each student will be required to make two seminar presentations. The seminar presentation mark is based on the student’s ability to demonstrate a clear understanding of the readings and to engage the class in a discussion on the important issues and themes. In addition to preparing a series of questions to lead the seminar, students must prepare an outline setting out the main issues to be addressed in class.

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity

    Plagiarism is a serious academic offence. Quoting material without citing its source or using authors’ arguments without acknowledging them is not only dishonest but subject to significant penalties both in terms of your grade and your standing at the university. York’s policy can be seen at www.yorku.ca/tutorial/academic_integrity/plagdef.html.

    Course Outline

Please go through the readings for the lecture prior to the class. After the class, go

    through the readings again more carefully.

January 8th Introduction to Public Law (Greene & Haigh)

    Canadian Constitutional and Administrative Law 4 of 6

     Intro to Course

     Public Law and the Legal System

    Reading: Ian Greene, The Courts (2006), Chapters 1-3

    January 15 The Canadian Constitution and The Rule of Law (Greene)

     Readings: British North America Act, 1867 (also known as the Constitution Act, 1867); Roncarelli v. Duplessis (1959), 16 DLR (2d) 689 (SCC).

    January 22 Federalism; The Impact of Judicial Decisions on Federalism

    (Haigh)

     Readings: Union Colliery Co. v. Bryden and AG for BC, [1899] AC 580 (JCPC); Cunningham and AG for BC v. Tomey Homma and AG for Canada (1902),

    [1903] AC 151 (JCPC).

    January 29 The Impact of Judicial Decisions on Federalism (cont’d)

    (Haigh)

     **Analysis of Federalism Assignment Due**

     Reading: Canada (A-G) v. Ontario (A-G), [1937] A.C. 32 (JCPC)

     (Labour Conventions).

     Discussion of Gerald Baier, Courts and Federalism, Judicial

     Doctrine in the United States Australia and Canada (2006).

February 5 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Greene)

     Readings: Excerpts from Ian Greene, The Charter of Rights. Toronto:

    Lorimer, 1989; R v. Oakes (1986), 26 D.L.R. (4th) 200 (SCC).

February 12: No Class: reading week

    February 19: Impact of the Charter and S. 35, CA 1982 (Greene)

    Readings: Sparrow v. The Queen, [1990] 1 SCR 1075; Sauvé v. Canada

    (Chief Electoral Officer), [2002] 3 S.C.R. 51; Greene, Chapter 5.

February 26: Rights and Freedoms Under the Charter (Haigh)

    **Case Analysis Assignment Due**

    Canadian Constitutional and Administrative Law 5 of 6

     Readings: RWDSU v. Dolphin Delivery Ltd., [1986] 2 S.C.R. 573; Multani v. Commission scolaire MargueriteBourgeoys, [2006] 1 S.C.R. 256.

March 4: Rights and Freedoms Under the Charter (cont’d) (Haigh)

    Readings: Wynberg v. Ontario, Ontario Court of Appeal, July 7, 2006. (Appeal to SCC denied); Queen v. L.B., Ontario Court of Appeal (2007).

March 11: Equality Rights (Haigh)

     Readings: Bliss v. AG. Canada (1978), 92 DLR (3d) 417 (SCC); Law

    Society of BC v. Andrews (1989), 56 DLR 1 (SCC).

March 18: Equality Rights (cont’d) (Haigh)

    Readings: Law v. Minister of Human Resources Development (1999), 170 DLR (4th) 1 (SCC).

March 25 Access to Justice (Greene)

    **case analyses due**

    Readings: British Columbia (Minister of Forests) v. Okanagan Indian Band, [2003] 3 S.C.R. 371; Little Sisters Book and Art Emporium v. Canada, [2007] 1

    SCR 38; Greene, Chapter 4.

April 1 Administrative Law, Principles of Natural Justice, & Standard

     of Review (Greene)

    **papers due**

    Readings: Baker v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration),

    1999] 2 S.C.R. 817; Pushpanathan v. Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration),

    [1998] 1 S.C.R. 982; Greene, Chapter 6.

From York University Faculty of Graduate Studies 2007-2009 Calendar

Tuesday, 1 January* New Year’s Day

    Tuesday, 15 January Winter Term registration deadline. Students who register

    after this date will incur a $200.00 late registration fee.

Canadian Constitutional and Administrative Law 6 of 6

Monday, 18 February* Family Day

    Friday, 21 March* Good Friday

    Sunday, 23 March* Easter Sunday

    Sunday, 20 April† Passover

    Monday, 21 April†* Passover

    Saturday, 26 April† Passover

    Sunday, 27 April† Passover

    Thursday, 15 May Summer Term tuition fees due and payable.

    Monday, 19 May* Victoria Day

    Tuesday, 1 July* Canada Day Holiday

    ** No classes or examinations will be scheduled on the evenings prior to, nor during the day of, these religious holy days. However, university offices will be open normal hours.

    No examinations will be scheduled on the evenings prior to, nor during the day of, these religious holy days. However, classes will be held and university offices will be open normal hours.

    Some of these dates are subject to change.

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