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wwwbeyond-reasonnet

    THE “BEYOND REASON” PREPARATION GUIDE

Purpose of this guide

    ? Almost any negotiation involves dealing with people.

    ? This means that emotions will be involved yours and theirs.

    ? Careful preparation on emotions can enhance your negotiation effectiveness.

Four parts to the guide

    1. The Core Concerns as a Lens: To understand the emotional landscape.

    2. The Core Concerns as a Lever: To enlist emotions that foster cooperation.

    3. Deal with Strong Negative Emotions

    4. Three Things to Remember

How to use this guide

    1. Complete it all. (40 min to 1 hour)

     ? If you are preparing to negotiate in an on-going relationship, use Parts I-IV

     ? If you are preparing to negotiate with someone for the first time, use Parts II-IV

    2. Run through the questions in your head. (10 min)

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

    I. The Core Concerns as a Lens

    Purpose: To understand the emotional landscape in order to make

     more informed choices.

In This Section:

    A. Clarify the Basics

    B. Become Aware of Your Own Core Concerns

    C. Step into Their Shoes

     D. Anticipate Their Core Concerns

    1 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005).

    For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide A. CLARIFY THE BASICS

Who are the parties:

What are the issues:

    B. BECOME AWARE OF YOUR OWN CORE CONCERNS

1. Appreciation: Do you feel misunderstood? Unheard? Devalued? Why?

    2. Affiliation: Do you feel distanced? Excluded? Why?

3. Autonomy: Do you feel that your freedom to make choices is constrained? Why?

4. Status: Do you feel demeaned? Put down? Why?

    5. Role: Do you feel unfulfilled in what you are doing? Why?

     2 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use

    without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005). For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

    C. STEP INTO THEIR SHOES

    Write a few sentences describing what the situation looks like from the other person’s perspective.

“The way I see the situation….

D. ANTICIPATE THEIR CORE CONCERNS

1. Appreciation: Do you (as the other person) feel misunderstood? Unheard? Devalued? Why?

    2. Affiliation: Do you (as the other person) feel distanced? Excluded? Why?

3. Autonomy: Do you (as the other person) feel that your freedom to make choices is constrained? Why?

4. Status: Do you (as the other person) feel demeaned? Put down? Why?

    5. Role: Do you (as the other person) feel unfulfilled in what you are doing? Why?

    3 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use

    without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005).

    For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

    II. The Core Concerns as a Lever

    Purpose of worksheet: To enlist emotions that foster cooperation.

In This Section:

    A. Stimulate Positive Emotions in the Other

    B. Stimulate Positive Emotions in Yourself

    4 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005).

    For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

    A. STIMULATE POSITIVE EMOTIONS IN THE OTHER 1. EXPRESS APPRECIATION

     ? What questions can you ask to better understand and find merit in what they think, feel, and have done?

     ? How might you communicate your enriched understanding?

2. BUILD AFFILIATION

     ? What common interests might you talk about?

     ? How will you establish yourselves as joint problem solvers?

     (e.g., “We are facing some tough challenges. How do you recommend we proceed?”)

     ? What might you say or ask to connect on a personal level?

     (e.g., “My kids kept me up all night.”)

3. RESPECT THEIR AUTONOMY

     ? What process might you suggest to structure the negotiation?

     (See pgs. 80 and 87 of Beyond Reason for suggestions)

     ? What habits of yours might impinge upon the other’s autonomy? (Do you talk too much? Listen too little?)

     ? How can you check this behavior?

4. ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR STATUS

     ? In what ways do they hold high social status?

     ? In what areas of expertise or experience do they hold high particular status?

     ? How will you communicate respect of their status?

     (e.g., You have more experience inand I have more experience inWe can use this to our advantage.”)

5. ENHANCE THEIR ROLE

     ? What roles might you play to foster their collaboration?

     (e.g. problem solver, listener, evaluator)

     ? What might you do or say to help them adopt a more fulfilling role?

     (e.g. Problem solver: What’s your advice on…”’; Option Generator: “How about we take a couple minutes to

     brainstorm some options?”)

    5 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use

    without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005). For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

B. STIMULATE POSITIVE EMOTIONS IN YOURSELF

1. APPRECIATION

     ? What are big points you want the other to understand?

     ? What stories or facts can you draw on to help them appreciate your perspective?

2. AFFILIATION

     ? Remind yourself of something that makes you feel connected to the other, such as _____________________.

     (e.g. both have kids, both worked late last night, both have to report to a tough boss)

     ? Remind yourself of a positive relationship in your life, such as ______________________.

3. AUTONOMY

     ? Remember: You have more autonomy than you think.

     ? List some of the many choices you have the power to make:

     (e.g. to walk away; to commit; to take a break; to think what you want to think)

4. STATUS

     ? Remind yourself (and the other?) about a lofty status you hold, such as ___________________.

5. ROLE

     ? What activities can you incorporate into your role to make it more fulfilling?

     (e.g. work on listening for their interests; work on brainstorming creative options)

    6 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005).

    For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

    III. Deal with Strong Emotions

    IV. Three Things to Remember

    7 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005).

    For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide

    DEAL WITH STRONG NEGATIVE EMOTIONS

Circle what you will do if you or the other becomes upset:

    ? Take a break.

     Pause. Stay silent for a moment.

     Break for coffee.

    ? Get some distance.

     Count to ten.

     Take a few deep breaths.

     Ask yourself: How important is this issue to me?

     Visualize a relaxing place.

     Let upsetting comments fly by and hit the wall behind you.

     Call to mind a good walk-away alternative.

    ? Change the environment.

     Adopt a relaxed position.

     Open the window.

     Suggest continuing over lunch.

    ? Think about what triggered your emotions and theirs.

     Feeling unappreciated?

     Disaffiliated?

     Impinged in autonomy?

     Belittled in status?

     Unfulfilled by your role?

    ? Other?

     8 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use

    without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005). For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

     The “Beyond Reason” Preparation Guide THREE THINGS TO REMEMBER

    Now that you have completed this worksheet, review what you’ve learned. What are three things you are going to remember to do?

    1.

    2.

    3.

    9 ? 2006 by Roger Fisher, Daniel L. Shapiro, Ph.D, and Zoe Segal-Reichlin. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use

    without written permission. Based on the ideas of Beyond Reason: Using Emotions as You Negotiate (Viking, 2005). For additional negotiation resources, visit www.beyond-reason.net.

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