DOC

Cosponsor the Education for All Act of 2010 (H

By Jesse Bryant,2014-08-18 02:21
9 views 0
Cosponsor the Education for All Act of 2010 (H

    750 First Street NE, Suite 1040

    Washington, DC 20002

    (202)783-4800

    www.results.org

    Cosponsor the Education for All Act of 2010

    H.R. 5117

    The Education for All Act of 2010 was introduced by Reps. Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Dave

    Reichert (R-WA).

    To cosponsor, please contact Ann Vaughan in Rep. Lowey’s office (ann.vaughan@mail.house.gov) or Michelle

    Brenan in Rep. Reichert’s office (michelle.brenan@mail.house.gov)

What does the Education for All Act Do?

    The EFA bill seeks to ensure the U.S. provides the resources and leadership to contribute to a successful

    international effort to provide all children with a quality basic education by 2015.

    To achieve the goal of universal quality basic education, the EFA Act lays out U.S. policy that includes working with other countries, international organizations, and civil society to:

    ; assist developing countries and strengthen their educational systems;

    ; assist NGOs and multilateral organizations; and

    ; promote education as the foundation for community development.

The EFA Act Also Supports the Following:

    Increase Access: The U.S. strategy to achieve Education for All shall seek to increase access for all children, particularly marginalized and vulnerable groups, including girls, children affected by conflict or humanitarian crises, disabled children, children in remote or rural areas, religious or ethnic minorities, indigenous peoples, orphans and children impacted by HIV/AIDS, child laborers and victims of trafficking.

    Improve Quality: To ensure efforts to improve the quality of education, the U.S. shall commit resources to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness and quality of basic education programs and develop specific indicators to measure learning outcomes.

Build Country Capacity and Country Ownership: The bill authorizes funding to help developing countries

    create and implement national education plans to achieve quality universal basic education. It also requires the U.S. to align assistance to support these plans; coordinate and integrate bilateral and multilateral assistance so that aid is directly responsive to country needs, capacity, and commitment; as well as promote sustainable development.

    Multilateral Assistance: The bill calls on the U.S. to support a multilateral education initiative, like the Fast Track Initiative or a multilateral Global Fund for Education. The multilateral initiative should be independent and governed equally by donors, developing country governments, and civil society based on the following principles:

    ; transparency with respect to financing, key policy decisions, and impact;

    ; coordination among governments, private sector, and civil society;

    ; mutual accountability between donors and recipients for achieving measurable results in access and

    quality;

    ; alignment with host country priorities; and

    ; predictable, long-term funding disbursed in a timely manner.

    Support Communities of Learning: Recognizing the importance of holistic development of communities, the U.S. should utilize schools as the foundations for community development and build them as centers of integrated development assistance programs, such as health, nutrition, adult literacy, business training, democracy education, and housing programs.

How Will the Policy Be Implemented?

    In order to implement the policy, the following activities and concepts may be used to expand access and improve the quality of basic education:

    ; monitor and evaluate student learning outcomes;

    ; train quality teachers and build adequate infrastructure;

    ; eliminate fees;

    ; replicate interventions that improve access, such as scholarships, school lunch, and school health

    programs;

    ; build systems to ensure oversight of education services and financing;

    ; ensure that schools are not incubators for violent extremism and are safe places for learning;

    ; provide human rights and conflict-resolution education;

    ; promote programs that teach civic education and life skills;

    ; support interventions to increase access for the most disadvantaged populations; and

    ; support a reformed Education for All Fast-Track Initiative or Global Fund for Education.

Does It Address Children Affected by Conflict and Crises?

    Considering that over half of children out of school live in countries in conflict, the EFA Act focuses on assisting children affected by conflict or humanitarian crises and would support efforts to:

    ; ensure a continuity of educational activities;

    ; reestablish formal education services and/or provide safe places for learning;

    ; promote out-of-school programs and flexible-hour schooling;

    ; provide infrastructure- even temporary- for education services;

    ; provide necessary materials to train and support teachers; and

    ; promote efforts to reintegrate teachers and students of conflict.

The Bill Also Directs:

    ; The President to create a comprehensive strategy on Education for All to achieve the targets and goals

    of Education for All as prioritized in this bill.

    ; The U.S. to improve coordination and reduce duplication within the U.S. and with foreign donor

    governments and international organizations at the global and country levels.

    ; The creation of the position of the Education for All Coordinator, which would oversee and carry out

    Education for All policies, ensure coordination within the U.S. Government and with NGOs and

    international partners, and convene an annual meeting to evaluate progress in the U.S. strategy for

    Education for All.

    ; The President to submit an annual report to Congress that will include efforts to achieve the goals and

    implement the strategy.

To Achieve These Goals, the Bill:

    ; Supports efforts to increase access, particularly for marginalized and vulnerable groups, including girls.

; Improves educational quality by expanding monitoring and evaluation systems, including the

    development of indicators to measure learning outcomes.

     2

    ; Calls on the U.S. to support a multilateral education initiative, such as a multilateral Global Fund for

    Education. This new multilateral initiative should be completely independent and governed equally by

    donor and developing country governments and civil society. It should be based on the following

    principles:

    ; transparency with respect to financing, key policy decisions, and impact

    ; coordination among governments, private sector, and civil society;

    ; mutual accountability between donors and recipients for achieving measurable results in

    access and quality;

    ; alignment with host country priorities; and,

    ; predictable, long-term funding disbursed in a timely manner.

; Builds country capacity and ownership by helping countries to create and implement national education

    plans and ensuring all aid is directly responsive to country needs.

    ; Supports communities of learning by integrating development assistance programs, such as health,

    nutrition, adult literacy, business training, democracy education, and housing programs, through schools.

; Prioritizes support to countries with the greatest need based on the percentage of kids out of school and

    with the greatest opportunity to expand access and improve quality.

; Supports interventions specific for children affected by conflict or humanitarian crises.

; Mandates that the president create a comprehensive Education for All strategy that will achieve the

    targets and goals of Education for All.

    ; Creates the position of Education for All Coordinator to oversee and carry out Education for All policies,

    ensure coordination within the U.S. Government and with NGOs and international partners, and annually

    convene a meeting to evaluate progress in fulfilling the U.S. strategy.

; Requires the president to submit an annual report to Congress on efforts made to achieve these goals.

; Authorizes sufficient funds to expand access to and improve quality of basic education.

     3

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com