DOC

ACTIVITY PLAN FORMAT

By Ricardo Myers,2014-03-20 14:09
7 views 0
ACTIVITY PLAN FORMAT

    CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Community and Voluntary Groups

Overview

This unit develops awareness of communities through practical activities, visits and role-

    play.

Content at a glance

    Aims Section Summary

Section 1 To identify communities Pupils will:

     to which individuals ; take part in teacher-led discussion

    Where belong and familiar ; identify, sort and match photographs and do I communities within the pictures

    belong? group. ; take part in a role-play

     ; make visits around the school

    Section 2 To understand sensory Pupils will:

     awareness and how ; engage in sensory experiences

    Making some people overcome ; gain insight into the Hearing Dogs for Deaf things their disabilities with the People Association/Guide Dogs for the easier help of other Blind/Dogs for the Disabled

    organisations. ; take part in a role-play

    ; meet a dog and its handler who visit the

    school

    Section 3 To understand how we Pupils will:

     can help a community. ; actively help a chosen group

    What can

    I do?

Time

This theme could easily take a whole term. Alternatively, you could select parts of it for

    three lessons.

Keywords

Charity, community, disability, group, organisation, role, senses, volunteer.

Extra curricula and whole school issues

    ; Section 2 may involve a visitor coming to the school ; Section 3 may involve going outside the school

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 1

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Links to the rest of this resource

The content of this theme is similar to that of Groups and Identity. It may be better to do

    Groups and Identity first. It also links well with Diversity and Identity and section 2 of

    Global Community. The work in Section 2 on dogs links to the work on animal rights in section 1 of Rights and Responsibilities. Section 3 of Economy suggests raising money

    for a charity or other cause. Section 3 of Global Community is about international

    charities.

Useful organisations

    Community Service Volunteers (CSV), 237 Pentonville Road, London N1 9NJ, Tel: 020 7278 6601, www.newforms.co.uk/csv

    Dogs for the Disabled, The Francis Hay Centre, Blacklocks Hill, Banbury, Oxfordshire OX17 2BS, Tel: 08700 776 600, Fax: 08700 776 601,

    email: info@dogsforthedisabled.org, www.dogsforthedisabled.org

    Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, The Grange, Wycombe Road, Saunderton, Buckinghamshire HP27 9NS, Tel: 01844 348 100, Fax: 01844 348 101, email: info@hearing-dogs.co.uk, www.hearing-dogs.co.uk

    Girlguiding UK, 17-19 Buckingham Palace Road, London SW1W 0PT, Tel: 020 7834 6242, Fax, 020 7630 6199, www.guides.org.uk

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association, Burghfield Common, Reading, Berkshire RG7 3YG, Tel: 0870 600 2323, email: guidedogs@guidedogs.org.uk

    The Scout Association, Gilwell Park, Chingford, London E4 7QW, Tel: 020 8433 7100, Fax: 020 8433 7103, email: info.centre@scout.org.uk, www.scouts.org.uk

    World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, World Bureau, Olave Centre, 12c Lyndhurst Road, London NW3 5PQ, email: wagggs@wagggsworld.org,

    www.wagggsworld.org

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 2

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Section 1: Where do I belong?

Learning objectives

Pupils may:

    ; be aware of being part of a group

    ; show a response to being part of different groups

    ; indicate a preference for particular groups

    ; recognise and identify familiar personal groups, e.g. own class, family ; develop awareness of the range of communities to which they belong

    ; begin to recognise that different people have different responsibilities within a group

    or community, e.g. head teacher, team captain

    ; recognise and identify a range of groups and communities e.g. youth club, scouts,

    sports teams

    ; recognise that there are many reasons why groups and communities exist ; recognise the need for authority and rules

Activity A: Who are we?

Look in mirrors.

Take individual photographs of everyone in class.

    Teacher-led discussion: pupils identify themselves and other people in the photographs. (Non-sighted pupils explore or identify peers and staff in class through touch and/or sound or with the aid of personal referents). Pupils sort the individual photographs/personal referents into different groups e.g. staff/pupils, boys/girls etc.

Activity B: Roles

    Discuss how the class is a group and how they fit within the school community.

    Identify, visit and record (using photographs, audiotape, video, personal referents or objects of reference for the activity) other groups within the school community e.g. other classes, midday supervisors, senior management team, administration staff etc.

    Discuss the different roles and responsibilities of these individuals and groups (again using links with symbols/objects of reference).

    Role-play: pretend to be part of one of the groups or communities discussed earlier, e.g. midday supervisors, sports team, pop group. Take on a leadership role in a familiar activity and demonstrate the need for authority and rules.

Activity C: Groups

    Use Symbol Cards 1.1, photo or object/artefact activities to help pupils to develop understanding and to accept differences between people in a positive way by

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 3

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    recognising them as part of their community. Using Symbol Cards 1.1, name the different groups and why they are a group. Match individuals (Symbol Cards 1.2) to their group (Symbol Cards 1.1).

(If you do not intend to do the Groups and Identity theme, you might take material from

    Section 1 of it at this point.)

    (Non-sighted pupils name familiar people in the group, e.g. class, family, and identify to which groups familiar people belong.)

Activity D: Recognising and identifying groups

    Divide the class into smaller groups. Ask each group to find 4 photographs/pictures/ artefacts of different types of groups or communities using newspapers and magazine. Identify the group or community in the photo and report back to the whole class.

Resources provided with this pack

; Symbol Cards 1.1 showing groups

    ; Symbol Cards 1.2 showing members of groups

Resources provided by the school

; Mirrors

    ; Photos of different groups (e.g. sports teams, music groups) cut from magazines ; Personal referents of people in school

    ; Artefacts/objects of reference to represent different groups or their activity ; Digital camera

    ; Newspapers and magazines

    ; Optional: audio or visual recorder, access to the Internet

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 4

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Section 2: Making things easier

    Note: See Appendix 1 about guide dogs. Contacts for Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Guide Dogs for the Blind, and Dogs for the Disabled can be found in useful organisations.

Learning objectives

Pupils may:

    ; show a response to a range of sensory experiences

    ; show an awareness of their own senses

    ; name the senses

    ; recognise that some people have sensory impairments

    ; recognise that some people require help with everyday tasks

    ; be aware of organisations that are available to help

    ; recognise different groups of people with sensory or mobility impairments ; recognise ways in which independent living can be achieved

Activity A: Our senses

Touch:

    Touch and feel box: Pupils describe and/or guess objects hidden in a box. Discuss what would help us identify objects (e.g. other senses)?

Smell and taste:

    Pupils smell and taste the various foods (e.g. crisps, jelly) to identify the different flavours and show preferences.

Hearing (identifying everyday sounds):

    (Not appropriate for pupils with a hearing impairment)

    Identify objects that make a noise. Use the Noises Grid 2.1: put a counter on top of each picture showing something that makes a noise. Identify sounds that are important to everyday living, e.g. doorbell, fire alarm.

Sight (bubble-wrap glasses):

    (Not appropriate for pupils with a visual impairment)

    Pupils wear bubble-wrap glasses to give them an idea of what it is like to be visually impaired. Pupils carry out everyday tasks wearing the glasses e.g. finding an object, making a drink, walking across the playground. Discuss what pupils could and could not do with the bubble-wrap glasses on.

Activity B: Working dogs

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People:

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 5

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    Identify differences and similarities between a pet dog and a hearing dog, e.g. what do dogs need? Do they look different? What can a hearing dog do? Explore objects related to caring for dogs, e.g. bowl, collar and lead.

    Ask a speaker from Hearing Dogs for Deaf People or a handler to bring in their dog and speak to the class.

AND/OR

Guide Dogs for the Blind:

    Identify differences and similarities between a pet dog and a guide dog, e.g. what do dogs need? Do they look different? What can a guide dog do? Explore objects related to caring for dogs, e.g. bowl, collar and lead.

    Role-play: blindfold one pupil in each pair. The sighted pupil leads the non-sighted pupil around the room taking on the role of the guide dog, and then the roles reverse. Report back on difficulties encountered through not being able to see. The teacher demonstrates through role-play how dangerous it is for blind people if things (e.g. fires, electrical cables) are left around.

    Ask a speaker from Guide Dogs for the Blind or a handler to bring in their dog and speak to the class.

AND/OR

Dogs for the Disabled:

    Identify differences and similarities between a pet dog and a dog for the disabled, e.g. what do dogs need? Do they look different? What can a dog for the disabled do? Explore objects related to caring for dogs, e.g. bowl, collar and lead. Ask a speaker from Dogs for the Disabled or a handler to bring in their dog and speak to the class.

Resources provided with this pack

; Noises Grid 2.1

Resources provided by the school

; Blindfolds

    ; Bubble wrap to wear as glasses

    ; Dog’s belongings, e.g. collar and lead, dog’s bowl.

    ; Food samples, e.g. crisps, jellies.

    ; Objects that make a noise, e.g. alarm clock, telephone.

    ; Touch and feel box

    ; Visitor from Hearing Dogs for Deaf People, Guide Dogs for the Blind or Dogs for the

    Disabled (See Appendix 1 for further information)

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 6

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Section 3: What can I do?

Learning objectives

Pupils may:

    ; show responses to unfamiliar people and new environments ; experience the work of different voluntary groups ; identify a group of people that have needs

    ; identify the needs of the group through listening ; recognise how they can personally help the group ; identify how voluntary organisations can help the group ; plan a way of helping the group and carry out the action plan over a period of time

    ; work alongside others in the community

Activity

Introduction:

    Choose a group to help. Consider their needs through role-play, visitors (e.g. an expert

    from Age Concern) or pictures (e.g. of grandparents).

Main activity:

    Make an action plan (Worksheet 3.1). Carry out the action plan, e.g. shop for older

    people, help in a staff crèche, help younger pupils.

Evaluation:

    Complete the evaluation sheet (Worksheet 3.2) or otherwise indicate whether the

    project was successful and enjoyable.

Resources provided with this pack

; Action Plan (Worksheet 3.1)

    ; Evaluation Sheet (Worksheet 3.2)

Resources provided by the school

    You can find ideas for local organisations with which to work at www.newforms.co.uk/csv or by contacting your local Council for Voluntary Service (Click on ‘Contact your CVS’ on www.nacvs.org.uk)

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 7

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Additional Activities

    ; Look at a photograph/symbol or personal referent of a person in the school then

    attempt to find that person

    ; Fund-raising: Each year group/tutor group researches local and national charities.

    Groups make presentations about specific charities and there is a debate ending in

    a vote on which charity to raise funds for. Pupils discuss ideas for fundraising,

    apportion responsibilities and plan and organise an event

    ; Pupils might join groups outside of school, e.g. sports

    ; Pupils do work experience in a hospital or charity shop

    ; Discussion of extended families

    ; Discuss what pupils’ families do to help the local community, e.g. looking after other

    parents’ children

    ; Pupils actively volunteer for roles within the community

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 8

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Appendix 1: Teachers’ notes about dogs

See useful organisations for contact details.

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People

    Hearing Dogs for Deaf People is a registered charity that rescues, trains and donates dogs to alert deaf people to everyday sounds. Hearing dogs are selected for their temperaments, character and ability. The dogs are trained at one of the three training centres belonging to the charity and each dog is trained to meet the specific needs of its deaf partner. The hearing dog uses its paw to touch and gain attention before indicating the sound source, either by leading its partner to it e.g. doorbell ringing, or by lying down to warn of potential danger e.g. fire bell rings. The dogs provide awareness of important sounds, companionship, confidence and greater independence.

Dogs for the Disabled

    Dogs for the Disabled is a charity that provides disabled people with specially trained dogs. These dogs carry out a range of practical everyday tasks, e.g. helping to dress and undress or retrieving dropped or out of reach items, to increase people’s independence and improve their quality of life. Golden Retrievers and Labradors are usually selected but other larger breeds are considered, e.g. Border Collies. Not all of the dogs trained are pedigrees but they must be of good temperament and character. The dogs are trained from puppies and spend the first year living with a puppy socialiser in a comfortable stable home environment learning basic obedience and interaction with children and adults. At around one year old, they are trained in their various tasks, (e.g. alerting, retrieving, pushing, and pulling) at the Frances Hay Centre for approximately four months. The matching process begins at about 16 months, when it is possible to see what the dog is good at and enjoys doing. Great care is taken in matching not only the ability of the dog but also the personality of both dog and client. Once this has taken place, it is possible to start the specialist training to ensure that the dog meets the needs of the client.

Guide Dogs for the Blind Association

    The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association is one of the most successful and popular charities in the United Kingdom. As the name suggests, it is most widely known for breeding and training guide dogs but also offers mobility and other rehabilitation services that meet the needs of blind and partially sighted people. Guide Dogs for the Blind funds work into ophthalmic and canine research, investing in new technology that could enhance the lives of the UK’s blind and partially sighted population. The working life of a guide dog is about seven years. A guide dog owner could have six or seven dogs during his or her lifetime. Retired dogs are placed with voluntary ‘adopters’. A

    guide dog can enable a blind or partially sighted person to live an independent lifestyle, e.g. go to work or on holiday, enjoy cultural activities or hobbies etc.

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 9

    CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    Worksheet 3.1 Name: Date:

    Action Plan

Project title:

What are we going to

    do? When?

    Where?

    Who will help?

    What will we need? I will use these skills:

    ; Communication

    ; Improving my learning

    ; Working with others

    ; Problem solving

    ; IT

    ; Numeracy

Community and Voluntary Groups Page 10

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com