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Tobacco 101

By Joshua Murphy,2014-08-09 18:15
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Tobacco 101

    Version 3

     2010

     Tobacco 101

     Presenters’ Guide

    Tobacco Technical Assistance

    Consortium (TTAC)

    Rollins School of Public Health

    Emory University

Table of Contents

    Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Classroom Environment ................................................................................................................... 2 Managing the Classroom .................................................................................................................. 3 Creating Classroom Ground Rules .................................................................................................... 4 Presenter’s Materials ....................................................................................................................... 5 Instructions for Finding State Prevalence Data ................................................................................. 6 Learning Objectives .......................................................................................................................... 7 Trainees’ Materials........................................................................................................................... 8 Tobacco 101: Presenter’s Syllabus .................................................................................................... 9 Tobacco 101 Contributors .............................................................................................................. 17

Tobacco 101: Presenter’s Syllabus

    Day 1

    The Evolution of Tobacco Control ............................................................................................... 10 Prevalence of Tobacco Use ......................................................................................................... 10 Impact of Tobacco Use ............................................................................................................... 10 Factors that Influence Tobacco Use ............................................................................................ 11 Day 2

    Credible Resources ..................................................................................................................... 13 Partners in Tobacco Control ....................................................................................................... 13 Taking a Public Health Approach to Tobacco Control .................................................................. 13

    CDC Recommendations for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs ..................................... 14

    Policy Interventions .................................................................................................................... 14 Strategies for Success ................................................................................................................. 15 Communities of Excellence ......................................................................................................... 16

    2

Introduction

    We provide presenters with all the resources and materials needed to carry out the Tobacco 101 Version 3 training.

    The training provides a broad overview of the tobacco control field and gives trainees the information and tools necessary to understand and appreciate tobacco control programs. This information is provided in two parts:

    Part 1 covers the evolution of the tobacco control movement. It provides data on the

    tobacco industry, the prevalence and effects of tobacco use, and the health effects and

    health risks associated with tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke.

    Part 2 covers the public health approach to reducing tobacco use and provides resources for

    developing tobacco control interventions. The training also covers the elements of

    comprehensive, science-based tobacco control programs using as frameworks the models

    of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and

    Prevention (CDC). In addition, Part 2 explains tobacco control strategies such as raising

    excise taxes, implementing smoke-free air policies, and providing systems-based cessation

    services.

    For the presenters of the training, we provide a PowerPoint presentation for each part of the training. We also provide a script for each slide in each PowerPoint presentation. Script is used

    loosely. We do not ask that you learn the script by heart, and (definitely) we do not want you to read it to the trainees. Instead, we ask that you become thoroughly familiar with the material in the script and deliver the information in your own words and style.

Included in the script are instructions for suggested activities that require trainees to apply the

    information they just learned through the presentation. For some activities, we provide a handout for the trainees. Other activities require that presenters look for the appropriate data and provide those data to the trainees before the activity begins.

Throughout the training the following teaching methods are used:

    ; Interactive lectures with visual aids.

    ; Group activities.

    ; Guided group discussions.

    ; Individual learning activities.

A booklet entitled “Essential Resources for Programs to Reduce Tobacco Use” is also provided for

    presenters and trainees. We recommend that presenters become familiar with these resources before they begin the training.

    1

Classroom Environment

    Tobacco 101 Version 3 is designed for, and is best presented in, a space that allows for various seating arrangements to facilitate the various learning environments used for lectures and activities. The ideal classroom has natural light, adjustable electric light, a temperature control device, and enough wall space to post many sheets torn from flip charts. When feasible, breaks and meals should be taken outside the classroom.

    The forward section of the classroom should be reserved for audio-visual projection. A minimum of two flipcharts are required, although ideally one flip chart should be available for every five to six trainees.

    The suggested classroom set-up comprises five to ten (or more depending on number of trainees) round tables with chairs arranged in a half moon formation. Ensure that each trainee can see the slides and that the same number of trainees is at each table. This arrangement is important during group activities.

    The diagram below illustrates the ideal set-up for an environment conducive to learning.

    Projection Screen

    Presenter’s Table

    Round tables set up

    with crescent seating

    facing the front of the

    room. Four to five

    people per table is

    recommended.

    2

Managing the Classroom

    In keeping with the theories and practice of adult learning, this training works best when the following principles are followed:

    Pre-Class Preparation: Before the training, place the trainee materials (folders, agenda, handouts, and so on) on the tables, one set in front of each seat. Make sure all technical equipment (computers, audio-visual) are working satisfactorily. Have the slide with the training title on display when the trainees enter the classroom.

    Break Times: Allow 1015 minute breaks throughout the training, at a minimum of every 3 hours. However, allow trainees to take a break whenever they need to, but ask that they do so without disrupting the class.

    Length of Sections: The length of time for each section will vary, depending on the experience level of the trainees, the number of questions they ask, the discussion generated, and the trainees’

    overall interest level.

    Transitions: Build in adequate time to transition between sections of the training. Regardless of how long a session runs, make sure the presentation flows smoothly from one topic to the next, and show connections between and among topics.

    Training Conclusion: Whether you are conducting the full training or only certain sections of it, conclude with a recap of the learning objectives.

    Resources: Give trainees any materials or resources they want (if you have them), or (if you do not have them) explain how and where they can find the materials they want.

    3

Creating Classroom Ground Rules

    To maximize the effectiveness of the training and encourage active participation, establish classroom ground rules at the outset. Ground rules set the tone for the meeting. In this case we want a tone of professionalism and courtesy.

    The ground rules are guidelines for behavior and should not be punitive or insulting. They should be modified to fit the norms in your region, the cultural make-up of the trainee group, the number of trainees, and your own experience. Here are examples of ground rules that could be used for this training:

    ; We are colleagues.

    ; We respect each other.

    ; We are courteous to each other.

    ; Whether we agree or disagree, we listen to each other with an open mind.

    ; We treat each other as allies. We all have the same goal.

    ; Everyone’s point of view is important, and we learn from each other.

    ; We balance “air time” to allow all of us a chance to express ourselves.

    ; We allow only one speaker at a time.

Invite trainees to ask questions. Stress that no question is irrelevant or stupid.

Other Issues to Cover

    Personal electronic devices: Cell phones, pagers, and other electronic devices should be

    turned off or on silent mode during the training. No texting allowed during the training.

    Restrooms: Using the restroom at non-break times is fine. However, ask that those who

    leave the room disrupt the rest of the group as little as possible.

    Leaving early: If some people are not able to stay for the complete training, ask them to

    tell you before the training begins. In addition, ask them to complete an evaluation form

    before they leave.

    4

Presenter’s Materials

    We supply most of the materials presenters need to conduct the training. However, presenters are responsible for procuring some items. Below are two lists. The first lists the items available on line at our Web site. The other lists the items presenters will need to gather and provide to trainees.

Items Supplied for Presenters

    ; Two sets of PowerPoint slides (one for Part 1 and one for Part 2).

    ; Two scripts (one for Part 1 and one for Part 2). Each script has suggested remarks for each

    slide. The script also has instructions for group activities and questions to ask trainees help

    get a discussion started.

    ; A detailed syllabus for Part 1 and Part 2:

    o Topic for each segment of the training.

    o A brief description of the material covered in each segment.

    o Length of time to spend on each topic.

    o Materials presenter and the trainees will need for each activity.

    ; Two sets of handouts (one for Part 1 and one for Part 2).

    ; A booklet “Essential Resources for Programs to Reduce Tobacco Use.” This booklet

    describes the major sources of information and research data associated with tobacco

    control. Included is a Web address for each resource.

    ; Evaluation form. The provided form may be modified to meet the training sponsors’ needs.

    The evaluation form is the last handout for Part 2.

Items Presenters Need to Supply

    ; Flip Charts. To save time during the training, we suggest that you prepare some materials

    for the flip chart in advance. For example, write out the agenda on a flip chart page, the

    ground rules on another flip chart page. Post all the prepared flip chart pages where all

    trainees can see them clearly.

    ; (Optional) Binders or folders in which the trainees can keep the training materials.

    ; Data for slide 33, Part 1. Instructions for finding the data are on the next page.

    ; Access to the Internet. We recognize that not all training facilities have access to the

    Internet. If your location does not have Internet access, then explain how to access data

    rather than show trainees how to do so.

    5

Instructions for Finding State Prevalence Data

    On slide 33 (Part 1), you will need to enter the data for the state in which you are conducting the training. Delete the instructions to presenters on the slide, and substitute the appropriate data. Instructions for accessing the data are below:

Accessing the Data

    The easiest prevalence data to access are those from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Web site:

    1. Go to the BRFSS home page: http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/index.htm

    2. Select Prevalence and Trends Data.

    3. Select your state, year, and category (tobacco use).

    4. Under Tobacco Use, choose Adults who are current smokers. A table with the data points

    and a bar graph will appear. These are the data you need for this presentation.

    5. Select the “Printer Friendly” version.

    6. Copy the table and the bar graph.

    7. Paste them onto the PowerPoint slide.

    If the data are too many to fit easily on a slide, print out the data and give a copy to each trainee.

Bonus

    When you have a state’s data on your computer screen, you can categorize the data by sex, age, race, income level, or education level. You can also look at data for different years, by using the drop-down boxes at the bottom. Other options allow you to compare your state’s data with those

    of other states and the data for one year with the data for another. These options are not necessary to find prevalence data, but they are worth knowing about.

    6

Learning Objectives

Part 1

    At the end of Part 1 of the training, trainees should be able to

    ; Describe the evolution of the tobacco control movement.

    ; Understand how events in U.S. history affected tobacco use.

    ; Show they understand how tobacco use emerged as a public health problem.

    ; Look at the problem of tobacco use from a national perspective.

    ; Obtain data on the prevalence and effects of tobacco use.

    ; Understand the importance of local data.

    ; Discuss the health effects and health risks associated with tobacco use.

    ; Discuss the health effects of exposure to secondhand smoke.

    ; Understand and explain the economic effects of tobacco use.

    ; Describe the physiological and psychological effects of tobacco use.

    ; Describe how the tobacco industry influences tobacco use.

    ; Discuss the government’s role in controlling tobacco use.

Part 2

    At the end of Part 2 of the training, trainees should be able to

    ; Find resources and data to help with program planning and communicating with policy

    makers and the public.

    ; Understand the benefits of using credible sources of information.

    ; Understand the public health approach to preventing and controlling tobacco use.

    ; Discuss several effective policy interventions for reducing tobacco use.

    ; Describe the components of a comprehensive tobacco control program.

    ; Understand the elements of science-based tobacco control programs.

    ; Understand how to implement strategies to reduce tobacco use.

    ; Understand how to sustain their tobacco control programs long term.

    7

    Trainees’ Materials

    Presenters need to prepare a set of materials for each trainee. All the materials can be downloaded

    from the Internet.

Materials for Part 1

    Agenda for the day

    Printed version of the PowerPoint presentation: 3 slides per page with room for notes

    “Essential Resources for Programs to Reduce Tobacco Use”

    Handouts

    1. Evolution of Tobacco Control

    2. Evolution of Tobacco Control: What comes next?

    3. Accessing Prevalence Data for Your State

    4. Effects of Tobacco Use at Various Life Stages

    5. Health Effects of Tobacco Use: Body Systems

    6. Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke

    7. Cigarette Tax Rates

    8. Other Tobacco Products

    9. Political Contributions by the Tobacco Industry

    10. Phillip Morris: A History of Double Talk

    11. Review of Part 1: The Problem of Tobacco

Materials for Part 2

    Agenda for the Day

    Printed version of the PowerPoint presentation: 3 slides per page with room for notes

    Handouts

    1. Accessing Credible Resources for Local Program Planning

    2. Partners in Tobacco Control

    3. Selecting Partners for Your Program

    4. Funding Levels of State Tobacco Control Programs (2008)

    5. States with Preemption of Smoke-Free Air Laws

    6. Economic Effects of Smoke-Free Air Laws: Case Studies

    7. Effects of Smoke-Free Air Ordinances on Smoking Prevalence and Cessation

    8. Review of Part 2: Reducing the Problem of Tobacco Use

     Evaluation form

    8

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